Results for 'Kant, Descartes, Schopenhauer, Heidegger, time, space,'

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  1.  73
    Time, space and the world as a Knowledge iss. 2024/01/18.Jean-Louis Boucon - 2023 - Academia.Edu.
    According to the Ontology of Knowledge the Universe is representation: we will show in this article that : - The nature of meaning "animates" the subject's representation and imposes time on it. - "Becoming oneself", condition of possibility of any representation, imposes on the subject the aesthetic intuition of space. - The objects of my representation come to exist by separation of my own existence following the preprint of a multiplicity of meaning-attractors in my Individuation.
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  2. Solipsism in Schopenhauer and early Wittgenstein.Mehran Sinaei Moghadam Sinaei Moghadam - 2019 - The Epistemological Research 19:195-212.
    Solipsism by which that means ‘I am the only conscious mind’, epistemologically and ontologically offers that ‘everything has to exist and has to be known through my consciousness.’ This view received philosophical attention after considering thinking subject in Descartes’ doctrine and also in investigating the mind of the knower in Barkley, Kant and following German idealists such as Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. Therefore, Solipsism could be an important philosophical problem, since ‘I perceive the outer world and also the other minds’ (...)
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  3. Varieties of Transcendental Idealism: Kant and Heidegger Thinking Beyond Life.G. Anthony Bruno - 2015 - Idealistic Studies 45 (1):81-102.
    In recent work, William Blattner claims that Heidegger is an empirical realist, but not a transcendental idealist. Blattner argues that, unlike Kant, Heidegger holds that thinking beyond human life warrants no judgment about nature's existence. This poses two problems. One is interpretive: Blattner misreads Kant's conception of the beyond-life as yielding the judgment that nature does not exist, for Kant shares Heidegger's view that such a judgment must lack sense. Another is programmatic: Blattner overstates the gap between Kant's and Heidegger's (...)
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  4. Mind, Body, Space, and Time.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In this essay I explore some of the basic elements of consciousness from a substance dualist point of view, incorporating some elements of Kant's Transcendental Analytic into an overall account of the constitution of consciousness.
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  5.  67
    Is Schopenhauer's Pessimism Sustainable?Nebojsa Jocic -
    In this essay, I will look into Arthur Schopenhauer’s pessimism, which culminates in the view that since life is not worth living, it is better for us to deny it than try to affirm it. I will argue that his pessimism is not sustainable, and that it fails on its own propositions. In section 1, I will look at the importance of suffering as the central point in Schopenhauer’s pessimism. For Schopenhauer, the essence of the world, which he calls will, (...)
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  6. Kant on the Givenness of Space and Time.Rosalind Chaplin - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):877-898.
    Famously, Kant describes space and time as infinite “given” magnitudes. An influential interpretative tradition reads this as a claim about phenomenological presence to the mind: in claiming that space and time are given, this reading holds, Kant means to claim that we have phenomenological access to space and time in our original intuitions of them. In this paper, I argue that we should instead understand givenness as a metaphysical notion. For Kant, space and time are ‘given’ in virtue of three (...)
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  7. Kant and Critical Reason of Mind.Irfan Ajvazi - 2021 - Idea Books.
    Kant and Critical Reason of Mind - Irfan Ajvazi -/- Table of Contents: -/- Chapter I: Kant and Plato Chapter II: Kant and Good Will Chapter III: Kant, Moral Worth, Emotion, Love & Sympathy Chapter IV: Kant, Reason & Universe Chapter V: Kant’s Meaning by Nature Chapter VI: Kant’s Schematism Chapter VII: Kant vs. Aristotle Chapter VIII: Kant versus Hume Chapter IX: Kant‘s Transcendental Idealism Chapter X: Reason and Faith In Kant -/- For Kant, causality is a pure concept of (...)
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  8. Castoriadis against Heidegger: Time and existence.Alexandros Schismenos - 2023 - DOI 10.5281/zenodo.7978996.
    The political actions of Martin Heidegger raise a compelling question to those concerned with philosophy: How was one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century willing to ally himself with Nazism and what does this mean for philosophy? This question has been raised and brushed aside from the end of the Second World War, when Heidegger was formally accused for his involvement with Hitler's regime and forbidden to attain any official teaching position henceforth. Important thinkers, like his colleague (...)
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  9. Heidegger on Kant, Time and the 'Form' of Intentionality.Sacha Golob - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (2):345 - 367.
    Between 1927 and 1936, Martin Heidegger devoted almost one thousand pages of close textual commentary to the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. This article aims to shed new light on the relationship between Kant and Heidegger by providing a fresh analysis of two central texts: Heidegger’s 1927/8 lecture course Phenomenological Interpretation of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and his 1929 monograph Kant and the Problem of Metaphysics. I argue that to make sense of Heidegger’s reading of Kant, one must resolve two (...)
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  10. Descartes on the Infinity of Space vs. Time.Geoffrey Gorham - 2018 - In Ohad Nachtomy & Reed Winegar (eds.), Infinity in Early Modern Philosophy. Berlin: Brill. pp. 45-61.
    In two rarely discussed passages – from unpublished notes on the Principles of Philosophy and a 1647 letter to Chanut – Descartes argues that the question of the infinite extension of space is importantly different from the infinity of time. In both passages, he is anxious to block the application of his well-known argument for the indefinite extension of space to time, in order to avoid the theologically problematic implication that the world has no beginning. Descartes concedes that we always (...)
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  11. Kant on the Transcendental Deduction of Space and Time: an essay on the philosophical resources of the Transcendental Aesthetic.Melissa McBay Merritt - 2010 - Kantian Review 14 (2):1-37.
    I take up Kant's remarks about a " transcendental deduction" of the "concepts of space and time". I argue for the need to make a clearer assessment of the philosophical resources of the Aesthetic in order to account for this transcendental deduction. Special attention needs to be given to the fact that the central task of the Aesthetic is simply the "exposition" of these concepts. The Metaphysical Exposition reflects upon facts about our usage to reveal our commitment to the idea (...)
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  12. Embodied Cognition in Berkeley and Kant: The Body's Own Space.Jennifer Mensch - 2019 - In Miranda Richardson, George Rousseau & Mike Wheeler (eds.), Distributed Cognition in Enlightenment and Romantic Culture. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press. pp. 74-94.
    Berkeley and Kant are known for having developed philosophical critiques of materialism, critiques leading them to propose instead an epistemology based on the coherence of our mental representations. For all that the two had in common, however, Kant was adamant in distinguishing his own " empirical realism " from the immaterialist consequences entailed by Berkeley's attack on abstract ideas. Kant focused his most explicit criticisms on Berkeley's account of space, and commentators have for the most part decided that Kant either (...)
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  13. Concepts, Space-and-Time, Metaphysics (Kant and the dialogue of John 4).Srećko Kovač - 2018 - In Mirosław Szatkowski (ed.), God, Time, Infinity. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 61-86.
    Kant's theory of transcendental ideas can be conceived as a sort of model theory for an empirical first-order object theory. The main features of Kant's theory of transcendental ideas (especially its antinomies and their solutions) can be recognized, in a modified way, in a religious discourse as exemplified in the dialogue of Jesus and the Samaritan woman (John 4). In this way, what is by Kant meant merely as regulative ideas obtains a sort of objective reality and becomes a religiously (...)
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  14. Philosophical aphorisms: Critical encounters with Heidegger and Nietzsche.Daniel Fidel Ferrer - 2004 - Kishor Vidya Niketan..
    Philosophical Aphorisms:Critical Encounters with Heidegger and Nietzsche by Daniel Fidel Ferrer -/- Topics Daniel Fidel Ferrer, aphorisms, Ontology, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Kant, Hegel -/- Experiment with the Philosophical Aphorism. Following Nietzsche's methodology and ambition, I want to say in this "book" more than anyone else said anywhere at any time. The key insight was in ascertaining Nietzsche's depth and understanding of the methodology of aphorisms. All of the great philosophers Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, Schelling, Hegel, Nietzsche, and Heidegger uniquely (...)
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  15. Introduction to the Ontology of Knowledge iss. 20211125.Jean-Louis Boucon - 2021 - Philpapers.
    We can only know what determines us as being and by the fact that it determines us as being. Our knowledge is therefore logically limited to what determines us as being. Since representation is defined as the act that makes knowledge dicible, our representation is logically limited to what dynamically determines us as being. Our representation is included in our becoming. Nothing that we represent, no infinite, can exceed the mere necessity of our becoming. The world, my physical being and (...)
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  16. Heidegger’s way to poetic dwelling via Being and Time.Onur Karamercan - 2021 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 1 (10):268-285.
    Although Heidegger’s explicit account of “poetic dwelling” belongs to his later philosophy, there are important indications that he was already engaging with the core matter of the notion in his early thought. Contrary to the idea that in Being and Time, “dwelling” amounts to mere practical coping with the environment, we would like to demonstrate that the notion is already a poetic issue in his early thought, as it requires the appropriation of our relation to the world via an authentic (...)
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  17. Heidegger’s Concept of Time in Logic: The Question of Truth.Clara Carus - 2022 - Phänomenologische Forschungen 1:19-36.
    In his 1925/26 lecture Logic: The Question of Truth Heidegger turns to an interpretation of the Critique of Pure Reason in order to elucidate his own understanding of time. The largely overlooked lecture series, I argue, is at the root of Heidegger’s exposition of the concept of time and its relationship with human existence (Dasein). Although Heidegger claims that Kant’s concept of time is confined to that of ‘world-time,’ Heidegger develops the first exposition of his understanding of time as ur-temporality (...)
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  18. Time and Space in Manic Episodes.Maria Luìsa Figueira & Luìs Madeira - 2011 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 4 (2):22-26.
    Temporality and Spatiality have been extensively addressed in philosophy, and their disturbances have been extensively studied in psychopathology (e.g. Wyllie 2005). Mental health patients: (1) describe pathological experiences of Time and Space (Gallagher and Varela 2003); (2) show disturbed timing (Tysk 1984); (3) experience psychopathological phenomena that could be the cause of changes in temporality and spatiality. These topics will be discussed in the case of mood disorders, in particular euphoric and dysphoric mania episodes. Any phenomenological study in mood disorders (...)
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  19. Care, Death, and Time in Heidegger and Frankfurt.B. Scot Rousse - 2016 - In Roman Altshuler & Michael Sigrist (eds.), Time and the Philosophy of Action. New York: Routledge. pp. 225-241.
    Both Martin Heidegger and Harry Frankfurt have argued that the fundamental feature of human identity is care. Both contend that caring is bound up with the fact that we are finite beings related to our own impending death, and both argue that caring has a distinctive, circular and non-instantaneous, temporal structure. In this paper, I explore the way Heidegger and Frankfurt each understand the relations among care, death, and time, and I argue for the superiority of Heideggerian version of this (...)
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  20. Heidegger Being and Time, Sein und Zeit (1927): An Index.Daniel Fidel Ferrer & Ritu Sharma - 2016 - archive.org.
    Heidegger Being and Time, Sein und Zeit (1927): An Index -/- By -/- Daniel Fidel Ferrer -/- and -/- Ritu Sharma -/- 1. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976. 2. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976 -- Concordances. 3. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976 -- Indexes. 4). Metaphysics. 5). Philosophy, German. 6). Heidegger, Martin; -- Wörterbuch. 7). Sein und Zeit. English. 8). Ontology. 9). Space and time. 10). Being and Time [Sein und Zeit]. I. Ferrer, Daniel Fidel, 1952-. II. Sharma, Ritu. -/- Pages for this (...)
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  21.  47
    Heidegger's Alternative History of Time.Emily Hughes & Marilyn Stendera - 2024 - New York: Routledge.
    This book reconstructs Heidegger’s philosophy of time by reading his work with and against a series of key interlocutors that he nominates as being central to his own critical history of time. In doing so, it explains what makes time of such significance for Heidegger and argues that Heidegger can contribute to contemporary debates in the philosophy of time. Time is a central concern for Heidegger, yet his thinking on the subject is fragmented, making it difficult to grasp its depth, (...)
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  22. Leibniz, the Young Kant, and Boscovich on the Relationality of Space.Idan Shimony - 2016 - In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für Unser Glück Oder Das Glück Anderer, X. Internationaler Leibniz-Kongress. Hildesheim: Georg Olms. pp. Vol. 2, pp. 73-85.
    Leibniz’s main thesis regarding the nature of space is that space is relational. This means that space is not an independent object or existent in itself, but rather a set of relations between objects existing at the same time. The reality of space, therefore, is derived from objects and their relations. For Leibniz and his successors, this view of space was intimately connected with the understanding of the composite nature of material objects. The nature of the relation between space and (...)
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  23. Matthew Rukgaber, Space, Time, and the Origins of Transcendental Idealism: Immanuel Kant’s Philosophy from 1747 to 1770. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020 Pp. 284. ISBN 9783030607418 (hbk) €103.99. [REVIEW]Edward Slowik - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):657-660.
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  24. The Phenomenological Kant: Heidegger's Interest in Transcendental Philosophy.Chad Engelland - 2010 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 41 (2):150-169.
    This paper provides a new, comprehensive overview of Martin Heidegger’s interpretations of Immanuel Kant. Its aim is to identify Heidegger’s motive in interpreting Kant and to distinguish, for the first time, the four phases of Heidegger’s reading of Kant. The promise of the “phenomenological Kant” gave Heidegger entrance to a rich domain of investigation. In four phases and with reference to Husserl, Heidegger interpreted Kant as first falling short of phenomenology (1919-1925), then approaching phenomenology (1925-1927), then advancing phenomenology (1927-1929), and (...)
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  25. Huygens' Center-of-Mass Space-time Reference Frame: Constructing a Cartesian Dynamics in the Wake of Newton's “de gravitatione” Argument.Edward Slowik - 1997 - Synthese 112 (2):247-269.
    This paper explores the possibility of constructing a Cartesian space-time that can resolve the dilemma posed by a famous argument from Newton's early essay, De gravitatione. In particular, Huygens' concept of a center-of-mass reference frame is utilized in an attempt to reconcile Descartes' relationalist theory of space and motion with both the Cartesian analysis of bodily impact and conservation law for quantity of motion. After presenting a modern formulation of a Cartesian space-time employing Huygens' frames, a series of Newtonian counter-replies (...)
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  26. From Einstein's Physics to Neurophilosophy: On the notions of space, time and field as cognoscitive conditions under Kantian-Husserlian approach in the General Relativity Theory.Ruth Castillo - forthcoming - Bitácora-E.
    The current technoscientific progress has led to a sectorization in the philosophy of science. Today the philosophy of science isn't is informal interested in studying old problems about the general characteristics of scientific practice. The interest of the philosopher of science is the study of concepts, problems and riddles of particular disciplines. Then, within this progress of philosophy of science, neuroscientific research stands out, because it invades issues traditionally addressed by the humanities, such as the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, (...)
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  27. time and space in special relativity a critique of the realist interpretation.Fredrik Andersen - 2010 - Dissertation, University of Tromsø
    In this thesis the author focuses on the metaphysical implications of the realist interpretation of special relativity. The realist interpretation is found wanting in coherence as it utilizes metaphysical concepts (as causation) that are left unjustified if the theory is taken at face value. The author points at a possible re-interpretation of special relativity that allows for a coherent metaphysical basis while containing the mathematical structure of the theory.
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  28. Heidegger’s Allegory of Reading: On Nietzsche and the Tradition.William D. Melaney - 2012 - In Alfred Denker Babette Babich (ed.), Hiedegger und Nietzsche. Brill. pp. 190-98.
    Heidegger's interpretation of Nietzsche has been canonized in the philosophical tradition as an almost perfect demonstration of how the forgetfulness of Being continues the dominant positions of modern metaphysics. However, the role of reading in the interpretative process casts a different light on Heidegger's approach to Nietzsche and his relationship to the philosophical tradition. This paper is concerned with three aspects of Heidegger's work, namely, (i) the role of Kant and Schopenhauer in Nietzsche's critique of metaphysics; (ii) Nietzsche's 'inversion' of (...)
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  29. Kant on the Pure Forms of Sensibility.Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes - forthcoming - In Andrew Stephenson & Anil Gomes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Kant. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Our aim in this chapter is to shed light on Kant’s account of the pure forms of sensibility by focusing on a somewhat neglected issue: Kant’s restriction of his claims about space and time to the case of human sensibility. Kant argues that space and time are the pure forms of sensibility for human cognizers. But he also says that we cannot know whether space and time are likewise the pure forms of sensibility for all discursive cognizers. A great deal (...)
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  30.  58
    The Foundational Importance of The Number 2.A. P. Bird - 2021 - Original Philosophy (00):00.
    Kant and Descartes followed an extreme clever, secure way of reasoning. For them, there must be a world of differences, or of movement, before we can extract anything (ideas, laws, concepts, etc.) from the world. For Kant, these “changes” that secure the possibility of knowledge were the ones we can measure with the categories of space and time. While, for Descartes, since there exist two things: “me” and “the world”, we can say knowledge is possible. But I think we can (...)
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  31. The Constitution of Space and Time in the Aufbau Viewed from a Kantian Perspective.Yusuke Kaneko - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Science Society, Japan 47 (1):19-36.
    The foremost aim of this paper is to realize the fourth part of the Aufbau. This part, which provides an actual phenomenalistic constitution system, is interpretable from a Kantian perspective (§§1-4). But Carnap plotted to overcome Kant’s old style of philosophy as well. We review this aspect of his constitution, focusing on space (§§7-13) and time (§§5-6), especially.
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  32. Active Perception and the Representation of Space.Mohan Matthen - 2014 - In Dustin Stokes, Mohan Matthen & Stephen Biggs (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press. pp. 44-72.
    Kant argued that the perceptual representations of space and time were templates for the perceived spatiotemporal ordering of objects, and common to all modalities. His idea is that these perceptual representations were specific to no modality, but prior to all—they are pre-modal, so to speak. In this paper, it is argued that active perception—purposeful interactive exploration of the environment by the senses—demands premodal representations of time and space.
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  33. The Ambiguity in Schopenhauer’s Doctrine of the Thing-in-Itself.Vasfi Onur Özen - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 74 (294):251-288.
    The general attitude towards Arthur Schopenhauer’s metaphysics is rather fiercely critical and at times even tendentious. It seems that the figure of Schopenhauer as an irredeemably flawed, stubborn, and contradictory philosopher serves as a leitmotiv among scholars. Schopenhauer’s identification of the thing-in-itself with the will continues to be a thorny puzzle in the secondary literature, and it presents perhaps the greatest challenge to Schopenhauer scholars. Schopenhauer borrows the term ‘thing-in-itself’ from Immanuel Kant, who uses it to refer to a reality (...)
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  34. Review of Space, Time, and Number in the Brain. [REVIEW]Carlos Montemayor & Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - 2015 - Mathematical Intelligencer 37 (2):93-98.
    Albert Einstein once made the following remark about "the world of our sense experiences": "the fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle." (1936, p. 351) A few decades later, another physicist, Eugene Wigner, wondered about the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences, concluding his classic article thus: "the miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor deserve" (1960, p. 14). (...)
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  35. Heidegger, Sociality, and Human Agency.B. Scot Rousse - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):417-451.
    According to Heidegger's Being and Time, social relations are constitutive of the core features of human agency. On this view, which I call a ‘strong conception’ of sociality, the core features of human agency cannot obtain in an individual subject independently of social relations to others. I explain the strong conception of sociality captured by Heidegger's underdeveloped notion of ‘being-with’ by reconstructing Heidegger's critique of the ‘weak conception’ of sociality characteristic of Kant's theory of agency. According to a weak conception, (...)
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  36. Retrieving Heidegger's temporal realism.B. Scot Rousse - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):205-226.
    Early Heidegger argues that a “homogenous space of nature” can be revealed by stripping away the intelligibility of Dasein's everyday world, a process he calls “deworlding.” Given this, some interpreters have suggested that Heidegger, despite not having worked out the details himself, is also committed to a notion of deworlded time. Such a “natural time” would amount to an endogenous sequentiality in which events are ordered independently of Dasein and the stand it takes on its being. I show that Heidegger (...)
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  37. Heidegger’s phenomenology of embodiment in the Zollikon Seminars.Cristian Ciocan - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (4):463-478.
    In this article, I focus on the problem of body as it is developed in Heidegger’s Zollikon Seminars, in contrast with its enigmatic concealment in Being and Time. In the first part, I emphasize the implicit connection of Heidegger’s approach of body with Husserl’s problematic of Leib and Körper, and with his phenomenological analyses of tactility. In the second part, I focus on Heidegger’s distinction between the limits of the lived body and the limits of the corresponding corporeal thing, opening (...)
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  38. Cartesianism and the Kinematics of Mechanisms: Or, How to find Fixed Reference Frames in a Cartesian Space-time.Edward Slowik - 1998 - Noûs 32 (3):364-385.
    In De gravitatione, Newton contends that Descartes' physics is fundamentally untenable since the "fixed" spatial landmarks required to ground the concept of inertial motion cannot be secured in the constantly changing Cartesian plenum. Likewise, it is has often been alleged that the collision rules in Descartes' Principles of Philosophy undermine the "relational" view of space and motion advanced in this text. This paper attempts to meet these challenges by investigating the theory of connected gears (or "kinematics of mechanisms") for a (...)
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  39. Martin Heidegger.W. Julian Korab-Karpowicz - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Heidegger’s main interest was ontology or the study of being. In his fundamental treatise, Being and Time, he attempted to access being (Sein) by means of phenomenological analysis of human existence (Dasein) in respect to its temporal and historical character. After the change of his thinking (“the turn”), Heidegger placed an emphasis on language as the vehicle through which the question of being can be unfolded. He turned to the exegesis of historical texts, especially of the Presocratics, but also of (...)
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  40. 'Heidegger’s Perversion of Virtue Ethics, 1924’.Sacha Golob - forthcoming - In Aaron Turner (ed.), Heidegger and the Classics. New York: SUNY Press.
    Heidegger’s debt to Aristotle is, of course, vast: Volpi went so far as to ask whether Being and Time was a translation of the Nicomachean Ethics. In this chapter, I want to investigate a fundamental divergence between the two, a rejection by early Heidegger of one of the central tenets of Aristotelian ethics. This rejection begins in the years before Being and Time and the forces behind it extend into the post-war period. I will focus in particular on Ga18, 1924’s (...)
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  41. Kant’s Metaphysical and Transcendental Deductions of the Categories. Tasks, Steps, and Claims of Identity.Till Hoeppner - 2022 - In Giuseppe Motta, Dennis Schulting & Udo Thiel (eds.), Kant's Transcendental Deduction and the Theory of Apperception: New Interpretations. De Gruyter. pp. 461-492.
    Kant’s Metaphysical Deduction of the Categories justifies their apriority, i.e. that their contents originate in the understanding itself, while the Transcendental Deduction justifies their objectivity, both in that they purport to represent objects of experience and that they do so successfully. The apriority of the categories, as explained in terms of acts of synthesis required for having sensible intuitions of objects, is justified by establishing their generic identity with logical functions of judgment, i.e. acts of judgment required for referring concepts (...)
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  42. Disentangling Heidegger’s transcendental questions.Chad Engelland - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):77-100.
    Recapitulating two recent trends in Heidegger-scholarship, this paper argues that the transcendental theme in Heidegger’s thought clarifies and relates the two basic questions of his philosophical itinerary. The preparatory question, which belongs to Being and Time , I.1–2, draws from the transcendental tradition to target the condition for the possibility of our openness to things: How must we be to access entities? The preliminary answer is that we are essentially opened up ecstatically and horizonally by timeliness. The fundamental question, which (...)
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  43. Kant on Negative Quantities, Real Opposition and Inertia.Jennifer McRobert - manuscript
    Kant's obscure essay entitled An Attempt to Introduce the Concept of Negative Quantities into Philosophy has received virtually no attention in the Kant literature. The essay has been in English translation for over twenty years, though not widely available. In his original 1983 translation, Gordon Treash argues that the Negative Quantities essay should be understood as part of an ongoing response to the philosophy of Christian Wolff. Like Hoffmann and Crusius before him, the Kant of 1763 is at odds with (...)
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  44. Grete Hermann as Neo-Kantian Philosopher of Space and Time Representation.Erik C. Banks - 2018 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 6 (3).
    Grete Hermann’s essay “Die naturphilosophischen Grundlagen der Quantenmechanik” has received much deserved scholarly attention in recent years. In this paper, I follow the lead of Elise Crull who sees in Hermann’s work the general outlines of a neo-Kantian interpretation of quantum theory. In full support of this view, I focus on Hermann’s central claim that limited spatio-temporal, and even analogically causal, representations of events exist within an overall relational structure of entangled quantum mechanical states that defy any unified spatio-temporal description. (...)
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  45.  77
    Heidegger's "Metametaphysics": Heidegger on Modernity and Postmodernity.Allen Porter - 2023 - Interpretation 50 (1):81-108.
    Methodologically rigorous description, analysis, and critique of postmodern phenomena presuppose a rigorous theory of postmodernity, for which the philosophy of Martin Heidegger holds great untapped promise. This essay explicates the basic content of Heidegger’s “metametaphysics,” since for Heidegger a “metaphysics” is the epochally prevailing projection of the meaning of being in general, and he offers a theory of Western metaphysics. I begin with Heidegger’s analysis of the “regional ontologies” of the sciences in his 1927 magnum opus Being and Time, since (...)
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  46. Immanuel Kant's Theory of Knowledge: Exploring the Relation Between Sensibility and Understanding.Wendell Allan Marinay - 2015 - The Pelican 7:56-66.
    Kant mentions two faculties of the mind that are involved in the knowing process, namely, sensibility and understanding. Through the former, the objects are “given” while through the latter, objects are “thought of.” The receiving faculty, that of sensibility, deals with space and time as pure intuitions. On the other, the thinking faculty - that of understanding, treats concepts or categories. Thus, these faculties of the human reason presuppose the two elements of knowledge: contents or intuitions and thoughts or concepts (...)
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  47. Heidegger & Nietzsche.Babette E. Babich, Alfred Denker & Holger Zaborowski (eds.) - 2012 - Amsterdam: Rodopi.
    This volume contains new and original papers on Martin Heidegger's complex relation to Friedrich Nietzsche's philosophy. The authors not only critically discuss the many aspects of Heidegger's reading of Nietzsche, they also interpret Heidegger's thought from a Nietzschean perspective. Here is presented for the first time an overview of not only Heidegger's and Nietzsche's philosophy but also an overview of what is alive - and dead - in their thinking. Many authors through a reading of Heidegger and Nietzsche deal with (...)
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  48. Spatiality in the Later Heidegger: Turning - Clearing - Letting.John Krummel - 2006 - Existentia (5-6):405-424.
    Within the context of Heidegger’s claim that his thinking has moved from the “meaning of being” to the “truth of being” and finally to the “place of being,” this paper examines the “spatial” motifs that become pronounced in his post-1930 attempts to think being apart from temporality. My contention is that his “shift” (Wendung) in thinking was a move beyond his earlier focus upon the project-horizon of the meaning (Sinn) of being, i.e., time, based on the existential hermeneutic of mortality, (...)
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  49. Why Kant Is a Non-Conceptualist But Is Better Regarded a Conceptualist.Corijn van Mazijk - 2014 - Kant Studies Online (1):170-201.
    ABSTRACT This paper deals with the problem of characterizing the content of experience as either conceptual or non-conceptual in -/- Kant’s transcendenta -/- l philosophy, a topic widely debated in contemporary philosophy. I start out with -/- Kant’s pre -/- -critical discussions of space and time in which he develops a specific notion of non-conceptual content. Secondly, I show that this notion of non-conceptual intuitional content does not seem to match well with the Transcendental Deduction. This incongruity results in three (...)
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  50. Kant and Consequentialism in Context: The Second Critique’s Response to Pistorius.Michael H. Walschots - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (2):313-340.
    Commentators disagree about the extent to which Kant’s ethics is compatible with consequentialism. A question that has not yet been asked is whether Kant had a view of his own regarding the fundamental difference between his ethical theory and a broadly consequentialist one. In this paper I argue that Kant does have such a view. I illustrate this by discussing his response to a well-known objection to his moral theory, namely that Kant offers an implicitly consequentialist theory of moral appraisal. (...)
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