Results for 'Madness'

33 found
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  1. Why It Doesn’T Matter I’M Not Insane: Descartes’s Madness Doubt in Focus.Andrew Russo - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):157-165.
    Harry Frankfurt has argued that Descartes’s madness doubt in the First Meditation is importantly different from his dreaming doubt. The madness doubt does not provide a reason for doubting the senses since were the meditator to suppose he was mad his ability to successfully complete the philosophical investigation he sets for himself in the first few pages of the Meditations would be undermined. I argue that Frankfurt’s interpretation of Descartes’s madness doubt is mistaken and that it should (...)
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  2. Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Woman’s Encounter with a Saleschild.Emily S. Lee - 2010 - In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by a “saleschild.” Utilizing the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, this article explores their interaction phenomenologically. This small interaction of seemingly simple misunderstanding represents a limit condition in Merleau-Ponty’s analysis. His phenomenological framework does not explain the chasm between the “saleschild” and Williams, that in a sense they do not participate in the same world. This interaction between the “saleschild” and (...)
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  3. Kitab kebijaksanaan orang-orang gila (An-Naisaburi: Madness Wisdom).Zainul Maarif - 2017 - Jakarta, Indonesia: Wali Pustaka.
    This is a book on madness wisdom in Arabic-Islamic civilization.
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  4.  25
    Combatting Consumer Madness.Wayne Henry, Mort Morehouse & Susan T. Gardner - 2017 - Teaching Ethics 17 (2):177-194.
    In his 2004 article “Hannah Arendt and Jean Baudrillard: Pedagogy in the Consumer Society,” Trevor Norris bemoans the degree to which contemporary education’s focus can increasingly be described as primarily nurturing “consumers in training.” He goes on to add that the consequences of such “mindless” consumerism is that it “erodes democratic life, reduces education to the reproduction of private accumulation, prevents social resistance from expressing itself as anything other than political apathy, and transforms all human relations into commercial transactions of (...)
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  5.  14
    Association, Madness, and the Measures of Probability in Locke and Hume.John Wright - 1987 - In Christopher Fox (ed.), Psychology and Literature in the Eighteenth Century. New York: AMS Press. pp. 103-28.
    This paper argues for the importance of Chapter 33 of Book 2 of Locke's _Essay Concerning Human Understanding_ ("Of the Association of Ideas) both for Locke's own philosophy and for its subsequent reception by Hume. It is argued that in the 4th edition of the Essay of 1700, in which the chapter was added, Locke acknowledged that many beliefs, particularly in religion, are not voluntary and cannot be eradicated through reason and evidence. The author discusses the origins of the chapter (...)
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  6.  51
    Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought. [REVIEW]Laura Matthews - 2018 - Metapsychology Online Reviews 22 (19).
    Madness and Modernism is undoubtedly one of the most profound and perspicacious treatments of an illness that is utterly baffling to most laypersons and academics alike. Sass artfully brings together two obscure, complex, and unnerving realms -- the schizophrenic and the modern and postmodern aesthetic -- into mutual enlightenment. The comparisons between schizophrenic symptoms such as loss of ego boundaries, perspectival switching, and world catastrophe with modern literature and art is so adroit that it is almost eerie. The reader (...)
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  7. The Madness of Sight.Emmanuel Alloa - 2007 - In Karin Leonhard & Silke Horstkotte (eds.), Seeing Perception. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 40-59. pp. 40--59.
    Viewing Vermeer with Merleau-Ponty's eyes.
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  8. "Bertrand Russell 1921-1970: The Ghost of Madness" by Ray Monk. [REVIEW]Tim Crane - 2000 - The Economist 1.
    ‘Poor Bertie’ Beatrice Webb wrote after receiving a visit from Bertrand Russell in 1931, ‘he has made a mess of his life and he knows it’. In the 1931 version of his Autobiography, Russell himself seemed to share Webb’s estimate of his achievements. Emotionally, intellectually and politically, he wrote, his life had been a failure. This sense of failure pervades the second volume of Ray Monk’s engrossing and insightful biography. At its heart is the failure of Russell’s marriages to Dora (...)
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  9.  57
    Philip Gerrans, The Measure of Madness. Philosophy of Mind, Cognitive Neuroscience, and Delusional Thought, MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts – London, 2014, pp. 274. [REVIEW]E. Loria - 2017 - Aphex 15:1-13.
    The Australian philosopher Philip Gerrans ambitiously tries to provide a general theory about the formation of delusions that should enclose neuronal, cognitive and phenomenological levels of description. His theory is defined as narrative and it is grounded on the so called “default thoughts”, that consist in simulations, autobiographical narrative fragments produced by the Default Mode Network (DMN). The DMN is a powerful simulation system that evolved to allow humans to simulate and imagine experiences in the absence of an eliciting stimulus. (...)
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  10. Reefer Madness: Cannabis, the Individual, and Public Policy.Tuomas E. Tahko - 2010 - In Dale Jaquette (ed.), Cannabis and Philosophy: What Were We Just Talking About? Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper is a survey of the positive and negative aspects of cannabis use from the point of view of the individual on one hand and from the point of view of the society on the other hand. Health, social, and political motives are all discussed, and the best method of harm reduction is analysed. The upshot is that zero tolerance policy is obsolete, and that most individuals would be better off using cannabis rather than other drugs.
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  11. Review of Gilles Deleuze, Two Regimes of Madness[REVIEW]Daniel W. Smith - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):237-241.
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  12.  73
    The Cruelty of Reason’. Review of Kenneth Craven, Jonathan Swift and the Millennium of Madness: The Information Age in Swift's A Tale of a Tub. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 1994 - Metascience 6:183-185.
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  13.  39
    Modernity, Madness, Disenchantment: Don Quixote's Hunger.Rebecca Gould - 2011 - Symploke 19 (1):35-53.
    This essay considers the relation between Don Quixote's hunger and the disenchantment (Entzauberung) that Max Weber understood as paradigmatic of the modern condition. Whereas hunger functions within a Hegelian dialectic of desire in Cervantes' novel, literary representations of hunger from later periods (in Kafka and post-Holocaust Polish poetry) acknowledge the cosmic insignificance of human need by substituting the desire for recognition with a desire for self-abdication. While Don Quixote's hunger drives him to seek recognition for his dream world, modern literature's (...)
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  14.  47
    (Master Thesis) Of Madness and Many-Valuedness: An Investigation Into Suszko's Thesis.Sanderson Molick - 2015 - Dissertation, UFRN
    Suszko’s Thesis is a philosophical claim regarding the nature of many-valuedness. It was formulated by the Polish logician Roman Suszko during the middle 70s and states the existence of “only but two truth values”. The thesis is a reaction against the notion of many-valuedness conceived by Jan Łukasiewicz. Reputed as one of the modern founders of many-valued logics, Łukasiewicz considered a third undeter- mined value in addition to the traditional Fregean values of Truth and Falsehood. For Łukasiewicz, his third value (...)
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  15. Descartes and the Crazy Argument.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    In Meditation I, Descartes dismisses the possibility that he might be insane as a ground for doubting that the senses are a source of knowledge of the external world. In this paper, I argue that Descartes was justified in so doing, and draw some general epistemological conclusions from this result.
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  16. Die Melancholie, der Geist des Kapitalismus und die Depression.Marco Solinas - 2010 - Freie Assoziation 13 (4):79-99.
    The essay aims to analyse the gradual historical process of the partial overlap, replacement and expansion of the theoretical paradigm of depression with respect to that of melancholy. The first part is devoted to analysing some of the central features of the multivalent thematizations of melancholy drawn up during modernity, also with relation to the spirit of capitalism (in its Weberian acceptation). This is followed by an overview of the birth of the modern category of depression, and the process that (...)
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  17.  46
    Os a priori da Psicologia em História da Loucura.Marcio Miotto - 2005 - Acheronta 22:282-290.
    O artigo busca trabalhar um aspecto pouco explorado da argumentação de "História da Loucura": a questão, brevemente enunciada por Foucault, de um "a priori concreto" das ciências "psi". Nisso, serão trabalhadas duas questões principais, a saber: a do estatuto do conhecimento sobre as doenças mentais como tributário de uma demanda moral (não científica), e a do estatuto do médico como "cientista" da loucura. Dentro desses dois âmbitos críticos, o Foucault que escreve seu primeiro grande livro não poupa nem mesmo o (...)
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  18. A Crítica À Psicologia Em História da Loucura.Marcio Miotto - 2005 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Paraná
    Essa dissertação é resultado de um projeto maior, intitulado “Sobre a Morte do Homem e a Psicologia, em Michel Foucault”. Esse projeto busca analisar as diversas nuances argumentativas empregadas por Foucault nas críticas às “antropologias”, figuradas em seus livros ditos “arqueológicos”. Para isso, parte-se de uma dupla problematização: a autocrítica feita pelo próprio Foucault a seus escritos dos anos 50, tributários de querelas epistemológicas e de fundação da psicologia e das ciências humanas; e a descrição mesma dessas querelas, tomando como (...)
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  19. Nietzsche's Reading of Cervantes' "Cruel" Humor in Don Quijote.Rolando Pérez - 2015 - eHumanista 30:168-175.
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  20.  18
    La mise en scène de l'Idiot raisonnable - pour une réévaluation de notre héritage philosophique.Luis Fellipe C. Garcia - 2016 - Eikasia. Revista de Filosofía 72:307-327.
    The aim of this article is to advance the idea according to which the Cartesian Cogito, the ground of modern philosophy and the source of the notion of thinking subject, is tributary of a certain method whose legitimation is grounded in western history. According to this hypothesis, there is a certain tool that plays a fundamental role in the production of this new philosophical notion: the dream. The argument will be developed in four parts. We will first proceed to (i) (...)
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  21. The Role of Eros in Plato's "Republic".Stanley Rosen - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):452-475.
    The first part of my hypothesis, then, is simple enough, and would be accepted in principle by most students of Plato: the dramatic structure of the dialogues is an essential part of their philosophical meaning. With respect to the poetic and mathematical aspects of philosophy, we may distinguish three general kinds of dialogue. For example, consider the Sophist and Statesman, where Socrates is virtually silent: the principal interlocutors are mathematicians and an Eleatic Stranger, a student of Parmenides, although one who (...)
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  22.  96
    Freud Beyond Foucault: Thinking Pleasure as a Site of Resistance.Robert Trumbull - 2018 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 32 (3):522-532.
    As Derrida showed in a later essay on Foucault’s relationship to psychoanalysis, Foucault displayed a marked ambivalence toward Freud, sometimes putting him on the side of the exclusion of madness and sometimes putting him on the side of those eager to listen to it. Yet, in the final stages of Foucault’s work, this ambivalence hardened into a resistance. By the time of The History of Sexuality, Volume 1, Freud is situated squarely on the side of power. It is precisely (...)
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  23. The Doxastic Status of Delusion and the Limits of Folk Psychology.José Eduardo Porcher - 2018 - In Inês Hipólito, Jorge Gonçalves & João G. Pereira (eds.), Schizophrenia and Common Sense: Explaining the Relation Between Madness and Social Values. New York: Springer.
    Clinical delusions are widely characterized as being pathological beliefs in both the clinical literature and in common sense. Recently, a philosophical debate has emerged between defenders of the commonsense position (doxasticists) and their opponents, who have the burden of pointing toward alternative characterizations (anti-doxasticists). In this chapter, I argue that both doxasticism and anti- doxasticism fail to characterize the functional role of delusions while at the same time being unable to play a role in the explanation of these phenomena. I (...)
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  24. The Case for Government by Artificial Intelligence.Steven James Bartlett - 2016 - Willamette University Faculty Research Website: Http://Www.Willamette.Edu/~Sbartlet/Documents/Bartlett_The%20Case%20for%20Government%20by%20Artifici al%20Intelligence.Pdf.
    THE CASE FOR GOVERNMENT BY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE. Tired of election madness? The rhetoric of politicians? Their unreliable promises? And less than good government? -/- Until recently, it hasn’t been hard for people to give up control to computers. Not very many people miss the effort and time required to do calculations by hand, to keep track of their finances, or to complete their tax returns manually. But relinquishing direct human control to self-driving cars is expected to be more of (...)
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  25. Has Autism Changed?Simon Cushing - 2018 - In Monika dos Santos & Jean-Francois Pelletier (eds.), The Social Constructions and Experiences of Madness. Leiden: Brill. pp. 75-94.
    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) was published in 2013 containing the following changes from the previous edition: gone are the subcategories ‘Autistic Disorder,’ ‘Asperger Syndrome’ and ‘PDD-NOS,’ replaced by the single diagnosis ‘Autism Spectrum Disorder,’ and there is a new category ‘Social Communication Disorder.’ In this paper I consider what kind of reasons would justify these changes if one were (a) a realist about autism, or (b) one were a constructivist. I explore (...)
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  26. Schizophrenia, Social Practices and Cultural Values: A Conceptual Introduction.Inês Hipólito, J. Pereira & J. Gonçalves - 2018 - In Inês Hipólito, Jorge Gonçalves & João G. Pereira (eds.), Studies in Brain and Mind. Springer Verlag. pp. 1-15.
    Schizophrenia is usually described as a fragmentation of subjective experience and the impossibility to engage in meaningful cultural and intersubjective practices. Although the term schizophrenia is less than 100 years old, madness is generally believed to have accompanied mankind through its historical and cultural ontogeny. What does it mean to be “mad”? The failure to adopt social practices or to internalize cultural values of common sense? Despite the vast amount of literature and research, it seems that the study of (...)
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  27. Reid's Defense of Common Sense.P. D. Magnus - 2008 - Philosophers' Imprint 8:1-14.
    Thomas Reid is often misread as defending common sense, if at all, only by relying on illicit premises about God or our natural faculties. On these theological or reliabilist misreadings, Reid makes common sense assertions where he cannot give arguments. This paper attempts to untangle Reid's defense of common sense by distinguishing four arguments: (a) the argument from madness, (b) the argument from natural faculties, (c) the argument from impotence, and (d) the argument from practical commitment. Of these, (a) (...)
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  28.  79
    Frederick Douglass's Longing for the End of Race.Ronald Sundstrom - 2005 - African Philosophy 8 (2):143-170.
    Frederick Douglass (1817–1895) argued that newly emancipated black Americans should assimilate into Anglo-American society and culture. Social assimilation would then lead to the entire physical amalgamation of the two groups, and the emergence of a new intermediate group that would be fully American. He, like those who were to follow, was driven by a vision of universal human fraternity in the light of which the varieties of human difference were incidental and far less important than the ethical, religious, and political (...)
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  29. Pure Visuality: Notes on Intellection & Form in Art & Architecture.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    Diaristic, mixed notes on: John Ruskin's The Poetry of Architecture (1837) and Modern Painters (1885); Caravaggio, Victorian Aesthetes, G.K. Chesterton, and Tacita Dean; Jay Fellows' Ruskin’s Maze: Mastery and Madness in His Art (1981); Slavoj Žižek at Jack Tilton Gallery, New York, New York, USA, April 23, 2009, “Architectural Parallax: Spandrels and Other Phenomena of Class Struggle”; “Titian, Tintoretto, Veronese: Rivals in Renaissance Venice”, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, March 15-August 16, 2009; Janet Harbord, Chris Marker: La (...)
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  30.  93
    Przyrodnicze podstawy sofistycznej koncepcji człowieka – zarys problematyki (Natural basis of the Sophistic conception of man — an outline).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - In Artur Pacewicz, Anna Olejarczyk & Janusz Jaskóła (eds.), Philosophiae Itinera. Studia i rozprawy ofiarowane Janinie Gajdzie-Krynickiej. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego. pp. 323-335.
    Natural basis of the Sophistic conception of man — an outline. Following the tradition of the philosophy of nature, influenced by hippocratic medicine, Sophists claim that human-being is a biological creature, a part of the world of nature, subject to its rules and rights. Convinced that human-being is a composition of physical and spiritual elements and interested in the relation between the two, the Sophists examine the impact of psychological and physical stimuli on human behaviour. They take under scrutiny various (...)
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  31.  19
    When Time Stumbled: Judges as Postmodern.Don Michael Hudson - 1999 - Dissertation, Westminster Theological Seminary
    What do we do with Judges? This two-edged word? This ambidextrous book? These ambivalent heroes? The Judges were drawing their last fleeting breaths shipwrecked and scattered upon the shores of historical-critical-grammatical-linear-modernist-masculine interpretation. "The narrative is primitive," they said. "The editors have made a mess," they exclaimed. "The conclusion is really an appendix," another said. Then the bible-acrobats jumped in pretending there was no literary carnage while at the same time drawing our eyes away from the literary carnage. "No, no, there (...)
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  32.  6
    What Is Wrong With The Rhapsode? The Role Of Inspiration In Plato’s The Ion.Tilmann Koeppe - 2007 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 4 (3):13-22.
    In Plato’s Ion we find Socrates engaged in a conversation with the rhapsode Ion. During the course of the dialogue, Socrates gives a critical account of the nature of the rhapsode’s profession. But what exactly is it that Socrates criticises? And is his account entirely critical or does he, in the end, attach some positive value to the rhapsode’s profession in virtue of its being a ‘divinely inspired’ activity?1 In this essay I shall argue that Socrates does in fact give (...)
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  33.  93
    Foucault on Freud.Andrew Howard - manuscript
    Despite being what is commonly regarded as major influence on Michel Foucault, Freud and psychoanalysis are rarely directly addressed in his works. A notable exception, often cited, is towards the very end of ‘Madness & Civilization’ . Where the early Foucault ends his thesis proposing the conception of madness as social structure with back handed praise by of Freud’s re-engagement with madness via dialogue. Madness, from the mid 1600’s onwards was ignored or 'silenced’ from its ‘zero-point’ (...)
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