Results for 'Mencius'

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Bibliography: Mencius in Asian Philosophy
  1. The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
    This article takes one of the richest historical debates, that of Hsun-Tzu and Mencius, as the contextual starting-point for the elaboration of human goodness. In support of Mencius, this article develops additional metaphysical and bio-social-evolutionary grounds, both of which parallel each other. The metaphysical analysis suggests that, in the spirit of Spinoza, an entity’s nature must necessarily include the drive toward its preservation. Likewise, the multi-faceted bio-social-evolutionary argument locates the fundamental telos of humanity in the preservation of social (...)
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  2. The Way of Heart: Mencius' Understanding of Justice.Huaiyu Wang - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 317-363.
    Through a comparative study of the meanings and origins of justice symbolized in the Greek word dikē and the Chinese word yi 毅, this essay explores an alternative understanding of justice exemplified in Mencius' teaching and illuminates a possibility of social and political justice that originates in the human heart instead of reason. On the basis of a genealogical study of yi that identifies its root meanings as "the dignity of the self" and "amity and affinity," this study recovers (...)
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  3. Mencius and Augustine on Evil.Bryan Van Norden - 2001 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Two Roads to Wisdom? La Salle, IL, USA: Open Court. pp. 313-36.
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  4. Mencius on Moral Responsibility.Xinyan Jiang - 2002 - In The Examined Life: Chinese Perspectives: Essays on Chinese Ethical Traditions. Global Publications, Binghamton University. pp. 1--141.
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  5.  57
    Mencius on Courage.Bryan W. Norden & Bryan Van Norden - 1997 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):237-256.
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  6.  57
    Mencius on Human Nature and Courage.Xinyan Jiang - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (3):265-289.
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  7. The Ji Self in Early Chinese Texts.Deborah A. Sommer - 2012 - In Jason Dockstader Hans-Georg Moller & Gunter Wohlfahrt (eds.), Selfhood East and West: De-Constructions of Identity. Traugott Bautz. pp. 17-45.
    The ji 己self is a site, storehouse, or depot of individuated allotment associated with the possession of things and qualities: wholesome and unwholesome desires (yu 欲) and aversions, emotions such as anxiety, and positive values such as humaneness and reverence. Each person's allotment is unique, and its "contents" are collected, measured, reflected on, and then distributed to others. The Analects, Mencius, Xunzi, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi each have their own vision for negotiating the space between self and other. Works as (...)
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  8. A Hermeneutic Reconstruction of the Child in the Well Example.Robert E. Allinson - 1992 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):297-308.
    This article draws on two Mencian illustrations of human goodness: the example of the child in the well and the metaphor of the continually deforested mountain. By reconstructing Mencius’ two novel ideas within the framework of a phenomenological thought-experiment, this article’s purpose is to explain the validity of this uncommon approach to ethics, an approach which recognizes that subjective participation is necessary to achieve any ethical understanding. It is through this active phenomenological introspection that the individual grasps the goodness (...)
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  9.  49
    Constructing Morality with Mengzi: Three Lessons on the Metaethics of Moral Progress.Seth Robertson & Jing Hu - forthcoming - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. New York, NY, USA:
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  10. Early Confucian Principles: The Potential Theoretic Foundation of Democracy in Modern China.Keqian Xu - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (2):135 – 148.
    The subtle and complex relation between Confucianism and modern democracy has long been a controversial issue, and it is now again becoming a topical issue in the process of political modernization in contemporary China. This paper argues that there are some quite basic early Confucian values and principles that are not only compatible with democracy, but also may become the theoretic foundation of modern democracy in China. Early Confucianism considers 'the people's will' as the direct representative of 'Heaven's will', with (...)
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  11.  84
    Mengzi and Virtue Ethics.Bryan Van Norden - 2003 - Journal of Ecumenical Studies 40 (1-2):120-36.
    I want first to present an overview of what I take to be Mengzi's own systematic ethics, which I shall approach as a version of "virtue ethics," and second to examine some of the standard arguments against Mengzi's position. -/- .
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  12.  68
    Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:151-176.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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  13. Les dispositions: une analyse integrationnelle(誠).Daihyun Chung - 2014 - Diogène 248:59-70.
    Would it be possible to have an alternative to the physicalist world-view? If any type of dualism is not an option, I am tempted to consider an integrational world view, which was first claimed by Confucius under the notion of cheng. I would propose an integrational thesis that cheng of an entity is a power to realize the embedded objective of it in the context where it interacts with all others. The notion of compassion may be said to be both (...)
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  14. Chinese Thought, From Confucius to Mao Tsê-Tung.Herrlee Glessner Creel - 1953 - University of Chicago Press.
    "Chinese philosophy before our Christian era is emphasized in this nontechnical summary of Chinese thought. Professor Creel also deals with Confucianism, the ideas of Mo-tsu and Mencius, Taoism, Legalism, and their variations and adaptations. As an introduction for the general reader, this book stands among the best."—_China: A Resource and Curriculum Guide_ "There exists nowhere else such a well-written presentation of the main trends in Chinese thought in so brief a space. The text is not cluttered with Chinese names (...)
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  15. Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2003 - In Keli Fang (ed.), Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. Commercial Press.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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