Results for 'german philosophy'

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  1.  53
    The Origins of Phenomenology in Austro-German Philosophy. Brentano, Husserl.Guillaume Frechette - 2019 - In John Shand (ed.), A Companion to Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 418-453.
    The development of phenomenology in nineteenth‐century German philosophy is that of a particular stream within the larger historical‐philosophical complex of Austro‐German philosophy. As the “grandfather of phenomenology” resp. the “disgusted grandfather of phenomenology,” but also as the key figure on the “Anglo‐Austrian Analytic Axis”, Brentano is at the source of the two main philosophical traditions in twentieth‐century philosophy. This chapter focuses mainly on his place in nineteenth‐century European philosophy and on the central themes and (...)
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  2. German Philosophy: Language and Style.Barry Smith - 1991 - Topoi 10 (2):155-161.
    The remarks which follow are intended to address a certain apparent asymmetry as between German and Anglo-Saxon philosophy. Put most simply, it is clear to every philosopher moving backwards and forwards between the two languages that the translation of an Anglo-Saxophone philosophical text into German is in general a much easier task than is the translation of a German philosophical text into English. The hypothesis suggests itself immediately that this is so because English philosophical writings are (...)
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  3.  20
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language (German).Markus Schrenk & Albert Newen - 2008 - WBG.
    The Philosophy ofLanguage belongs to the foundations of philosophical reflexion. In this volume, its central problems and strategies are explained, and the nature of sentences and other elements of language are analysed. The didactical exposition of the most important schools and thinkers makes the volume particularly interesting for readers new to the subject.
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  4.  9
    From Völkerpsychologie to Cultural Anthropology: Erich Rothacker’s Philosophy of Culture.Johannes Steizinger - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
    Erich Rothacker (1888–1965) was a key figure in early-twentieth-century philosophy in Germany. In this paper, I examine the development of Rothacker’s philosophy of culture from 1907 to 1945. Rothacker began his philosophical career with a völkerpsychological dissertation on history, outlining his early biologistic conception of culture (1907–1913). In his mid-career work, he then turned to Wilhelm Dilthey’s (1833–1911) Lebensphilosophie (philosophy of life), advancing a hermeneutic approach to culture (1919–1928). In his later work (1929–1945), Rothacker developed a cultural (...)
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  5.  20
    Barry Smith and His Influence On (Not Only, But Mainly My) Philosophy.Peter Simons - 2017 - Cosmos + Taxis 4 (4):38-41.
    Autobiographical survey of interactions between the author and Barry Smith, especially as concerns the background and influence of the Seminar for Austro-German Philosophy and work on the relevance of Adolf Reinach, Roman Ingarden and other Central-European thinkers to contemporary analytic philosophy.
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  6.  95
    The Authority of the German Religious Constitution: Public Law, Philosophy, and Democracy.Ian Hunter - unknown
    The present religious constitution of the Federal Republic of Germany is the product of protracted historical conflicts and political settlements that began in the sixteenth century. The mediation of these conflicts and settlements and the piecemeal establishment of the constitution was the achievement of imperial public law and diplomacy. Germany’s religious constitution—a secular and relativistic juridical framework protecting a plurality of confessional religions—pre-dated liberalism and democracy, and owes nothing to normative philosophical constructions of individual freedoms and rights, or social justice (...)
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  7.  50
    Religion and Early German Romanticism.Jacqueline Mariña - forthcoming - In Elizabeth Millan (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of German Romantic Philosophy.
    This paper explores the reception of Kant's understanding of consciousness by both Romantics and Idealists from 1785 to 1799, and traces its impact on the theory of religion. I first look at Kant's understanding of consciousness as developed in the first Critique, and then looks at how figures such as Fichte, Jacobi, Hölderlin, Novalis, and Schleiermacher received this theory of consciousness and its implications for their understanding of religion.
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  8.  73
    The Age of German Idealism.Robert C. Solomon & Kathleen Marie Higgins (eds.) - 1993 - Routledge.
    The turn of the nineteenth century marked a rich and exciting explosion of philosophical energy and talent. The enormity of the revolution set off in philosophy by Immanuel Kant was comparable, in Kant's own estimation, with the Copernican Revolution that ended the Middle Ages. The movement he set in motion, the fast-moving and often cantankerous dialectic of "German Idealism," inspired some of the most creative philosophers in modern times: including G. W. F. Hegel and Arthur Schopenhauer as well (...)
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  9. German Poetry and Philosophy.Fee Haase - manuscript
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  10.  85
    Un difficile ritorno a casa: la Filosofia della Scienza in Germania - Uneasy homecoming: Philosophy of science in germany.Gereon Wolters - 2006 - Bollettino Della Società Filosofica Italiana (189):37-50.
    The paper - originally a lecture in the "40th Anniversary Lecture Series 2001-2002" of the University of Pittsburgh (attached to the Italian text)- gives a survey of the development of philosophy of science in Germany and of the role tthe Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science plays in this development.
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  11. Kant and Rational Psychology.Corey W. Dyck - 2014 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Corey W. Dyck presents a new account of Kant's criticism of the rational investigation of the soul in his monumental Critique of Pure Reason, in light of its eighteenth-century German context. When characterizing the rational psychology that is Kant's target in the Paralogisms of Pure Reason chapter of the Critique commentators typically only refer to an approach to, and an account of, the soul found principally in the thought of Descartes and Leibniz. But Dyck argues that to do so (...)
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  12. Life as the Schema of Freedom: Schelling’s Organic Form of Philosophy.Bruce Matthews - 2011 - SUNY.
    The life and ideas of F. W. J. Schelling are often overlooked in favor of the more familiar Kant, Fichte, or Hegel. What these three lack, however, is Schelling’s evolving view of philosophy. Where others saw the possibility for a single, unflinching system of thought, Schelling was unafraid to question the foundations of his own ideas. In this book, Bruce Matthews argues that the organic view of philosophy is the fundamental idea behind Schelling’s thought. Focusing in particular on (...)
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  13.  28
    The Role of Skepticism in the Emergence of German Idealism.Michael Baur - 1999 - In Michael Baur & Daniel Dahlstrom (eds.), The Emergence of German Idealism. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 63-91.
    According to Immanuel Kant’s well-known account of his own intellectual development, it was the skeptic David Hume who roused him from his dogmatic slumber. According to some popular accounts of post-Kantian philosophy, it was the soporific speculation of the idealists that quickly returned German philosophy to the Procrustean bed of unverifiable metaphysics, where it dogmatically slept for half of the nineteenth century. This popular picture of post-Kantian German philosophy receives some apparent support from the relevant (...)
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  14. Revisiting The Classical German Idea of the University.Marek Kwiek - 2008 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):55-78.
    The aim of the paper is to provide a philosophical and historical background to current discussions about the changing relationships between the university and the state through revisiting the classical “Humboldtian” model of the university as discussed in classical German philosophy. This historical detour is intended to highlight the cultural rootedness of the modern idea of the university, and its close links to the idea of the modern national state. The paper discusses the idea of the university as (...)
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  15.  46
    Why Polish Philosophy Does Not Exist.Barry Smith - 2006 - In J. Jadacki & J. Pasniczek (eds.), Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities, vol. 89. Reidel. pp. 19-39.
    Why have Polish philosophers fared so badly as concerns their admission into the pantheon of Continental Philosophers? Why, for example, should Heidegger and Derrida be included in this pantheon, but not Ingarden or Tarski? Why, to put the question from another side, should there be so close an association in Poland between philosophy and logic, and between philosophy and science? We distinguish a series of answers to this question, which are dealt with under the following headings: (a) the (...)
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  16. The Grounding of Positive Philosophy: The Berlin Lectures.Bruce Matthews - 2007 - SUNY.
    _The first English translation of Schelling’s final “existential system.”_.
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  17. Austrian and Hungarian Philosophy: On the Logic of Wittgenstein and Pauler.Barry Smith - 2014 - In Anne Reboul (ed.), Mind, Meaning and Metaphysics. Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Kevin Mulligan. Springer. pp. 387-486.
    As Kevin Mulligan, more than anyone else, has demonstrated, there is a distinction within the philosophy of the German-speaking world between two principal currents: of idealism / transcendentalism, characteristic of Northern Germany; and of realism / objectivism, characteristic of Austria and the South. We explore some of the implications of this distinction with reference to the influence of Austrian (and German) philosophy on philosophical developments in Hungary, focusing on the work of Ákos von Pauler, and especially (...)
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  18.  34
    Schopenhauer’s Moral Philosophy.Alistair Welchman - 2017 - In Jens Timmerman & Sacha Golob (eds.), The Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 448-58.
    Arthur Schopenhauer (1788-1860) was a system philosopher in the grand tradition of classical German idealism. Broadly an adherent of Kant’s transcendental idealism, he is now most noted for his belief that Kant’s thing in itself can best be described as ‘will’, something he argued in his 1819 work The World as Will and Representation (WWRI 124/H 2:119). Schopenhauer’s term ‘will’ does not refer primarily to human willing, that is, conscious striving towards a goal. Following Kant he argues that willing (...)
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  19. Nietzschean Wholeness.Gabriel Zamosc - forthcoming - In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge.
    In this paper I investigate affinities between Nietzsche’s early philosophy and some aspects of Kant’s moral theory. In so doing, I develop further my reading of Nietzschean wholeness as an ideal that consists in the achievement of cultural—not psychic—integration by pursuing the ennoblement of humanity in oneself and in all. This cultural achievement is equivalent to the procreation of the genius or the perfection of nature. For Nietzsche, the process by means of which we come to realize the genius (...)
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  20. A Dialogue Concerning Aesthetics and Apolaustics.Timothy M. Costelloe & Andrew Chignell - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):v-xvi.
    A debate between two aestheticians concerning the relative influence of Scottish and German philosophers on the contemporary discipline. -/- .
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  21.  92
    Rationalist Foundations and the Science of Force.Marius Stan - forthcoming - In Brandon Look & Frederick Beiser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  22.  49
    On Forms of Communication In Philosophy.Barry Smith - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:73-82.
    In previous work, I have drawn attention to certain systematic differences among philosophical traditions as regards to the literary forms that are prevalent in each. In this paper, however, I focus on the commentary form. I raise the question of why the use of commentaries abounds in most traditions except those transmitted in the English language and suggest that problems of translation are central to this issue. I argue that the appearance of commentaries in a philosophical tradition is a criterion (...)
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  23. Women and Philosophy in Eighteenth Century Germany.Corey W. Dyck (ed.) - forthcoming - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Women and Philosophy in 18th Century Germany gathers for the first time an exceptional group of scholars with the explicit aim of composing a comprehensive portrait of the complex and manifold contributions on the part of women in 18th century Germany. Amidst the re-evaluation of the place of women in the history of early Modern philosophy, this vital and distinctive intellectual context has thus far been missing. As this volume will show, women intellectuals contributed crucially (directly and indirectly) (...)
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  24.  61
    “Dios ha muerto” y la cuestión de la ciencia en Nietzsche. “God is dead” and the question of science in Nietzsche.Osman Daniel Choque Aliaga & Osman D. Choque-Aliaga - 2019 - Estudios de Filosofía 59:139-166.
    Este artículo pretende establecer una relación entre la frase “Dios ha muerto” y el tema de la ciencia en Nietzsche. Para tal fin, se hará un análisis de la frase “Dios ha muerto” a la luz de la reciente interpretación hecha en el mundo alemán. En segundo lugar, nos ocuparemos de los conceptos de ausencia y caos para determinar si dichas nociones pueden ser consideradas como un paso ulterior a la “muerte de Dios”. Finalmente, revisaremos el tema de la ciencia: (...)
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  25. Experimental Ordinary Language Philosophy: A Cross-Linguistic Study of Defeasible Default Inferences.Eugen Fischer, Paul E. Engelhardt, Joachim Horvath & Hiroshi Ohtani - forthcoming - Synthese:1-42.
    This paper provides new tools for philosophical argument analysis and fresh empirical foundations for ‘critical’ ordinary language philosophy. Language comprehension routinely involves stereotypical inferences with contextual defeaters. J.L. Austin’s Sense and Sensibilia first mooted the idea that contextually inappropriate stereotypical inferences from verbal case-descriptions drive some philosophical paradoxes; these engender philosophical problems that can be resolved by exposing the underlying fallacies. We build on psycholinguistic research on salience effects to explain when and why even perfectly competent speakers cannot help (...)
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  26. Heidegger Anmerkungen I-V (Schwarze Hefte 1942-1948): An Index.Daniel Fidel Ferrer - 2017 - Surprise AZ: Verlag Daniel Fidel Ferrer.
    Heidegger Anmerkungen I-V (Schwarze Hefte 1942-1948): An Index / By Daniel Fidel Ferrer ©Daniel Fidel Ferrer, 2017. Pages 1-401. Note: the entire GA 97 is indexed. -/- Cover art by Shawn Rodriguez. -/- 1. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976. 2. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976 -- Concordances. 3. Heidegger, Martin, -- 1889-1976 -- Indexes. 4). Metaphysics. 5). Philosophy, German. 6). Heidegger, Martin; -- Table of Contents -/- 1). Preface and Introduction. 2). Background. 3). Main Index (pages, 20 to 401). -/- (...)
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  27. Kant in English: An Index.Daniel Fidel Ferrer - 2017 - Surprise AZ: Verlag Daniel FIdel Ferrer.
    Kant in English: An Index / By Daniel Fidel Ferrer. ©Daniel Fidel Ferrer, 2017. Pages 1 to 2675. Includes bibliographical references. Index. -/- 1. Ontology. 2. Metaphysics. 3. Philosophy, German. 4. Thought and thinking. 5. Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804. 6. Practice (Philosophy). 7. Philosophy and civilization. 8). Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- Wörterbuch. 9. Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- Concordances. 10. Kant, Immanuel, 1724-1804 -- 1889-1976 – Indexes. I. Ferrer, Daniel Fidel, 1952-. -/- MOTTO As a famous motto calls (...)
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  28. Frege and German Philosophical Idealism.Nikolay Milkov - 2015 - In Dieter Schott (ed.), Frege: Freund(e) und Feind(e): Proceedings of the International Conference 2013. Logos. pp. 88-104.
    The received view has it that analytic philosophy emerged as a rebellion against the German Idealists (above all Hegel) and their British epigones (the British neo-Hegelians). This at least was Russell’s story: the German Idealism failed to achieve solid results in philosophy. Of course, Frege too sought after solid results. He, however, had a different story to tell. Frege never spoke against Hegel, or Fichte. Similarly to the German Idealists, his sworn enemy was the empiricism (...)
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  29. Empiricism and Rationalism in Nineteenth-Century Histories of Philosophy.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - Journal of the History of Ideas 77 (2):253-282.
    This paper traces the ancestry of a familiar historiographical narrative, according to which early modern philosophy was marked by the development of empiricism, rationalism, and their synthesis by Immanuel Kant. It is often claimed that this narrative became standard in the nineteenth century, due to the influence of Thomas Reid, Kant and his disciples, or German Hegelians and British Idealists. The paper argues that the narrative became standard only at the turn of the twentieth century. This was not (...)
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  30.  54
    Walter Kasper.Antonio Russo - 2018 - In Cultura. Rome, Italy: Studium edizioni. pp. 284.
    In 1964, the young Walter Kasper (born in 1933) was granted by the Faculty of Catholic Theology at Tübingen the licence to teach dogmatic theology on the basis of a thesis on Philosophie und Theologie der Geschichte in der Spätphilosophie Schellings (Philosophy and Theology of History in Schelling’s Late Philosophy). Kasper’s interest in Schelling, himself a student at the Evangelisches Stift at Tübingen, thus originated in the context of his university studies in the school of J.R. Geiselmann and (...)
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  31. Anton Wilhelm Amo: The African Philosopher in 18th Europe.Dwight Lewis - 2018 - Blog of The American Philosophical Association.
    Anton Wilhelm Amo (c. 1700 – c. 1750) – born in West Africa, enslaved, and then gifted to the Duke of Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel – became the first African to earn a Ph.D. in philosophy at a European university. He went on to teach philosophy at the Universities of Halle and Jena. On the 16th of April, 1734, at the University of Wittenberg, he defended his dissertation, De Humanae Mentis Apatheia (On the Impassivity of the Human Mind), in which Amo (...)
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  32.  12
    Relativism in German Idealism, Historicism and Neo-Kantianism.Katherina Kinzel - forthcoming - In Martin Kusch (ed.), Routledge Handbook on Relativism. London: Routladge.
    This chapter traces the development of relativist ideas in nineteenth-century debates about history and historical knowledge. It distinguishes between two contexts in which these ideas first emerged. First, the early-to-mid nineteenth-century encounter between speculative German idealism and professional historiography. Second, the late nineteenth-century debate between hermeneutic philosophy and orthodox Neo-Kantianism. The paper summarizes key differences between these two contexts: in the former, historical ontology and historical methodology formed a unity, in the latter, they came apart. As a result, (...)
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  33. A Philosopher in the Lab. Carl Stumpf on Philosophy and Experimental Sciences.Riccardo Martinelli - 2015 - Philosophia Scientiæ 19:23-43.
    This essay addresses the interrelations between philosophy and experimental sciences that lie at the heart of Carl Stumpf’s epistemology. Following a biographical exposé demonstrating how Stumpf succeeded in acquiring a dual competence in both philosophical and scientific fields, we examine the vast array of academic disciplines encompassed by his research. Such a biographical treatment aims, indeed, to better promote the thrust of Stumpf’s assertion that philosophical enquiries should always be carried out in close connection with scientific practices, and underlines (...)
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  34. The Neurath-Haller Thesis: Austria and the Rise of Scientific Philosophy.Barry Smith - 1997 - In Keith Lehrer & Johann Christian Marek (eds.), Austrian Philosophy Past and Present. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 1-20.
    The term ‘Continental philosophy’ designates not philosophy on the continent of Europe as a whole, but rather a selective slice of Franco-German philosophy. Through a critical analysis of the arguments advanced by Otto Neurath, the paper addresses the issue of why Austrian philosophers in particular are not counted in the pantheon of Continental philosophers. Austrian philosophy is marked by the predominance of philosophical analysis and of the philosophy of science. The paper concludes that it (...)
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  35.  10
    Austria and the Rise of Scientific Philosophy.Barry Smith - 2004 - In Arkadiusz Chrudzimski & Wolfgang Huemer (eds.), Phenomenology and Analysis: Essays on Central European Philosophy. Ontos. pp. 33-56.
    The term ‘Continental philosophy’ designates not philosophy on the continent of Europe as a whole, but rather a selective slice of Franco-German philosophy. Through a critical analysis of the arguments advanced by Otto Neurath, the paper addresses the issue of why Austrian philosophers in particular are not counted in the pantheon of Continental philosophers. Austrian philosophy is marked by the predominance of philosophical analysis and of the philosophy of science. The paper concludes that it (...)
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  36. Contemporary Legal Philosophising: Schmitt, Kelsen, Lukács, Hart, & Law and Literature, with Marxism's Dark Legacy in Central Europe (on Teaching Legal Philosophy in Appendix).Csaba Varga - 2013 - Szent István Társulat.
    Reedition of papers in English spanning from 1986 to 2009 /// Historical background -- An imposed legacy -- Twentieth century contemporaneity -- Appendix: The philosophy of teaching legal philosophy in Hungary /// HISTORICAL BACKGROUND -- PHILOSOPHY OF LAW IN CENTRAL & EASTERN EUROPE: A SKETCH OF HISTORY [1999] 11–21 // PHILOSOPHISING ON LAW IN THE TURMOIL OF COMMUNIST TAKEOVER IN HUNGARY (TWO PORTRAITS, INTERWAR AND POSTWAR: JULIUS MOÓR & ISTVÁN LOSONCZY) [2001–2002] 23–39: Julius Moór 23 / István (...)
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  37. Gestalt Theory: An Essay in Philosophy.Barry Smith - 1988 - In Foundations of Gestalt Theory. Vienna: Philosophia Verlag. pp. 11-81.
    The Austrian philosopher Christian von Ehrenfels published his essay "On 'Gestalt Qualities'" in 1890. The essay initiated a current of thought which enjoyed a powerful position in the philosophy and psychology of the first half of this century and has more recently enjoyed a minor resurgence of interest in the area of cognitive science, above all in criticisms of the so-called 'strong programme' in artificial intelligence. The theory of Gestalt is of course associated most specifically with psychologists of the (...)
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  38.  86
    Rederick Charles Beiser: The Genesis of Neo-Kantianism.Matko Globačnik - 2016 - Synthesis Philosophica 31 (1):210-215.
    Review of Frederick Charles Beiser's "The Genesis of Neo-Kantianism, 1796-1880".
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  39.  91
    Personal Identity.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - In Transformation of the Self in the thought of Schleiermacher. Oxford University Press.
    This is the third chapter of my book Transformation of the self, which covers Schleiermacher's reception of Kant on the problem of personal identity.
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  40. On Going Back to Kant.Andrew Chignell - 2008 - Philosophical Forum 39 (2):109-124.
    A broad overview of the NeoKantian movement in Germany, written as an introduction to a series of essays about that movement. -/- .
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  41.  24
    Estado e liberdade na Filosofia da História de Hegel.Gabriel Rodrigues da Silva - 2018 - Revista ConTextura 10 (Nº 13):7-16.
    The purpose of this article is to present and analyze the relationship between the concept of State (Staat) and the concept of freedom (Freiheit) as expounded by the German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) in his Lectures on Philosophy of History (Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Geschichte), published posthumously for the first time in 1837. The article’s exposition will generally follow the second chapter of the work in question – called the Determination of the Spirit in Universal (...)
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  42.  28
    Selfhood and Relationality.Jacqueline Mariña - 2017 - In Joel Rasmussen, Judith Wolfe & Johannes Zachhuber (eds.), Oxford Handbook for Nineteenth Century Christian Thought. Oxford University Press. pp. 127-142.
    Nineteenth century Christian thought about self and relationality was stamped by the reception of Kant’s groundbreaking revision to the Cartesian cogito. For René Descartes (1596-1650), the self is a thinking thing (res cogitans), a simple substance retaining its unity and identity over time. For Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), on the other hand, consciousness is not a substance but an ongoing activity having a double constitution, or two moments: first, the original activity of consciousness, what Kant would call original apperception, and second, (...)
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  43.  44
    The Principle of Individuation.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - In Transformation of the Self in the thought of Schleiermacher. Oxford University Press.
    This is the second chapter of my book Transformation of the Self. It concerns Schleiermacher's understanding of the principle of individuation, in dialogue with Kant, Jacobi, Leibniz and Spinoza.
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  44.  21
    Where Have All the Monads Gone? Substance and Transcedental Freedom in Schleiermacher.Jacqueline Mariña - 2015 - Journal of Religion 95 (4):477-505.
    This article explores the later Schleiermacher’s metaphysics of substance and what it entails concerning the question of transcendental freedom. I show that in espousing a metaphysics of substance, Schleiermacher also abandoned an understanding of nature as a mere mechanism, a view implying what I call a “state-state view of causation” (“SSV” for short). Adoption of the view of the self as substance was motivated by the primacy of practical and religious concerns in Schleiermacher’s later work: in Christian Faith, an analysis (...)
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  45.  18
    The Philosopher's Stone.Jacqueline Mariña - 2008 - In Transformation of the Self in the thought of Schleiermacher. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first chapter of my book Transformation of the Self in the Thought of Friedrich Schleiermacher. It is a look as some of Schleiermacher's early attempts to critique Kant's ethics, in particular with respect to the idea of transcendental freedom and the problem of act attribution.
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  46.  52
    Apriori im Wandel. Für und wider eine kritische Metaphysik der Natur.Kay Herrmann - 2012 - Winter.
    In the 19th century, a transition took place from the classical to the modern ideal of science: Science would no longer be regarded as a categorical-deductive system of absolute truths, but instead as a hypothetical-deductive system of problematically conditional propositions. In this process, the synthetic a priori also took on more and more of the status of something problematically conditional, which could be found out and corrected empirically, and was itself even ultimately contingent upon empiricism. Along the way, it lost (...)
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  47.  31
    Zwischen Naturphilosophie und Anthropologie. Konzeptionen des Alters zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik.Giovanna Pinna - 2007 - In Jörg Vögele, Johannes Siegrist, Hans-Georg Pott, Andrea von Hülsen-Esch, Christoph auf der Horst, Henriette Herwig, Monika Gomille & Heiner Fangerau (eds.), Alterskulturen Und Potentiale des Alters. Akademie Verlag. pp. 141-152.
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  48.  25
    The Philosopher's Voice: Philosophy, Politics, and Language in the Nineteenth Century, by Andrew Fiala. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):333-335.
    A positive review of a book about four nineteenth century German philosophers (Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx) who sought to use philosophy to effect political change. To this end they each decided whom to address and how. Their objective: enhance freedom and/or enlightenment. Final topic: the relevance of these writers and their agenda to contemporary philosophy.
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  49.  21
    Conhecimento e ação na perspectiva de Hegel.Gabriel Rodrigues da Silva - manuscript
    I propose to present a relation between knowledge (Wissen) and human action (Handlung) from the perspective of the German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831). For this, I will use mainly of the Phenomenology of Spirit (Phenomenologie des Geistes) - published in 1807. According the philosopher himself, this work is a science of the experience of consciousness – this was the first name chosen by Hegel for this work (Vaz, 2014, p. 11-12). Throughout the work, it we can see (...)
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  50.  29
    Hegel: história, liberdade e progresso.Gabriel Rodrigues da Silva - 2018 - Dissertation,
    The objective of this work is to analyze and to present the Introduction of the work Lessons on the Philosophy of History, written by the German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel. Throughout the work, the chapters that constitute the Introduction of the work got the priority, since it is in these chapters that Hegel presents and defines the fundamental concepts that will be the key to reading the rest of the work. These concepts include: history, freedom, progress, reason, (...)
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