Results for 'material culture'

999 found
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  1.  60
    Material Culture Preface.Eugene Halton - 2009 - In Phillip Vannini (ed.), Material Culture and Technology in Everyday Life: Ethnographic Approaches. New York, NY, USA:
    Material culture and technoculture not only provide openings to study culture, but raise questions about contemporary materialism and technology more generally as well. Material culture tells a story, though usually not the whole story. The meanings of things are various, and finding out what they are requires a variety of approaches, from simply asking people what their things mean or observing how they use or don’t use them, to backtracking their history, or contextualizing them in (...)
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  2. Creativity, Cognition and Material Culture: An Introduction.Lambros Malafouris, Chris Gosden & Karenleigh A. Overmann - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (1):1-4.
    Introduction to the special issue in Pragmatics & Cognition focused on creativity, cognition, and material culture. With contributions from Maurice Bloch, Chris Gosden, Tim Ingold, John Kirsh, Carl Knappett & Sander van der Leeuw, Lambros Malafouris, Frédéric Vallée-Tourangeau, Kevin Warwick, and Tom Wynn and Frederick L. Coolidge.
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  3.  91
    Peter Galison, Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics. [REVIEW]Sean F. Johnston - 1999 - Science and Public Policy 26:75-76.
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  4. Beyond Marble, Medicants & Myth: Epidaurus' History, Material Culture, Purpose and Place in the Greater Mediterranean Area.Jan M. Van der Molen - Apr 14, 2020 - University of Groningen.
    'The most famous of sanctuaries of Asclepius had their origin from Epidaurus’, Pausanias writes in his Hellados Periegesis (‘Description of Greece’). All across the Aegean and beyond, word of the salutary reputation of Epidaurian divinity had spread. And as tales of Epidaurus’ sanctuary of Asclepius travelled the lands and crossed the seas, so did the urge to ensure that the Epidaurian success formula was, as we say, coming soon to a place near you. So we know Epidaurus had managed to (...)
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  5. Cultural Artefacts and Neglect of the Materials From Which They Are Made.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2017 - Abstracta 10:35-44.
    This paper discusses an explanation, offered by Tim Ingold, for why social and cultural anthropologists have so far paid little attention to the materials from which artefacts are composed. The explanation is that these anthropologists accept a certain argument. According to the argument, what an anthropologist should focus on when examining an artefact is the quality that makes it part of a culture, and this is not the materials from which the artefact is composed. I show that Ingold has (...)
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  6. Spongy Brains and Material Memories.John Sutton - 2007 - In Mary Floyd-Wilson & Garrett Sullivan (eds.), Embodiment and Environment in Early Modern England. Palgrave.
    Embodied human minds operate in and spread across a vast and uneven world of things—artifacts, technologies, and institutions which they have collectively constructed and maintained through cultural and individual history. This chapter seeks to add a historical dimension to the enthusiastically future-oriented study of “natural-born cyborgs” in the philosophy of cognitive science,3 and a cognitive dimension to recent work on material memories and symbol systems in early modern England, bringing humoral psychophysiology together with material culture studies. The (...)
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  7. Thinking Materially: Cognition as Extended and Enacted.Karenleigh A. Overmann - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (3-4):354-373.
    Human cognition is extended and enacted. Drawing the boundaries of cognition to include the resources and attributes of the body and materiality allows an examination of how these components interact with the brain as a system, especially over cultural and evolutionary spans of time. Literacy and numeracy provide examples of multigenerational, incremental change in both psychological functioning and material forms. Though we think materiality, its central role in human cognition is often unappreciated, for reasons that include conceptual distribution over (...)
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  8. Materializing Systemic Racism, Materializing Health Disparities.Vanessa Carbonell & Shen-yi Liao - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):16-18.
    The purpose of cultural competence education for medical professionals is to ensure respectful care and reduce health disparities. Yet as Berger and Miller (2021) show, the cultural competence framework is dated, confused, and self-defeating. They argue that the framework ignores the primary driver of health disparities—systemic racism—and is apt to exacerbate rather than mitigate bias and ethnocentrism. They propose replacing cultural competence with a framework that attends to two social aspects of structural inequality: health and social policy, and institutional-system activity; (...)
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  9. Material Evidence.Alison Wylie & Robert Chapman (eds.) - 2015 - New York / London: Routledge.
    How do archaeologists make effective use of physical traces and material culture as repositories of evidence? Material Evidence is a collection of 19 essays that take a resolutely case-based approach to this question, exploring key instances of exemplary practice, instructive failures, and innovative developments in the use of archaeological data as evidence. The goal is to bring to the surface the wisdom of practice, teasing out norms of archaeological reasoning from evidence. -/- Archaeologists make compelling use of (...)
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  10. Minds, Materials and Metaphors.Adam Toon - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    What is the relationship between mental states and items of material culture, like notebooks, maps or lists? The extended mind thesis (ExM) offers an influential and controversial answer to this question. According to ExM, items of material culture can form part of the material basis for our mental states. Although ExM offers a radical view of the location of mental states, it fits comfortably with a traditional, representationalist account of the nature of those states. I (...)
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  11.  41
    Bill Endres, Digitizing Medieval Manuscripts: The St. Chad Gospels, Materiality, Recoveries, and Representation in 2D & 3D. (Medieval Media Cultures.) Leeds: Arc Humanities Press, 2019. Pp. Viii, 120; 12 Black-and-White Figures and 8 Tables. $79. ISBN: 978-1-9424-0179-7. [REVIEW]Alberto Campagnolo - 2021 - Speculum 96 (1):208-210.
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  12. The Material Origin of Numbers: Insights From the Archaeology of the Ancient Near East.Karenleigh Anne Overmann - 2019 - Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA: Gorgias Press.
    What are numbers, and where do they come from? A novel answer to these timeless questions is proposed by cognitive archaeologist Karenleigh A. Overmann, based on her groundbreaking study of material devices used for counting in the Ancient Near East—fingers, tallies, tokens, and numerical notations—as interpreted through the latest neuropsychological insights into human numeracy and literacy. The result, a unique synthesis of interdisciplinary data, outlines how number concepts would have been realized in a pristine original condition to develop into (...)
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  13. Cognitive History and Cultural Epidemiology.Christophe Heintz - 2010 - In Luther H. Martin & Jesper Sørensen (eds.), Past Minds: Studies in Cognitive Historiography. Equinox.
    Cultural epidemiology is a theoretical framework that enables historical studies to be informed by cognitive science. It incorporates insights from evolutionary psychology (viz. cultural evolution is constrained by universal properties of the human cognitive apparatus that result from biological evolution) and from Darwinian models of cultural evolution (viz. population thinking: cultural phenomena are distributions of resembling items among a community and its habitat). Its research program includes the study of the multiple cognitive mechanisms that cause the distribution, on a cultural (...)
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  14. Material, Form and Art: The Generation of Freedom.John T. Sanders - manuscript
    Freedom is generated in at least two distinct ways: as the ability to avoid perceived dangers and pursue perceived goods, and even to pursue complicated plans in those directions, freedom evolves. But as a social and political matter, freedom seems more subject to human will. The best social institutions -- the kind that serve to encourage or constrain freedom of choice -- also appear to be evolutionary products in some sense. Can there be too much freedom? Of course there can. (...)
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  15. Understanding Cultural Traits: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on Cultural Diversity.Fabrizio Panebianco & Emanuele Serrelli (eds.) - 2018 - Springer.
    UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity (2 November 2001) defines culture with an emphasis on cultural features: “culture should be regarded as the set of distinctive spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional features of society or a social group”, encompassing, “in addition to art and literature, lifestyles, ways of living together, value systems, traditions and beliefs”. Cultural traits are also the primitive of mathematical models of cultural transmission inspired by population genetics, imported and refined by economics. Any serious (...)
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  16.  96
    The Idea of a Cultural Aesthetic.Arnold Berleant - 2003 - Dialogue and Universalism 13 (11-12):113-122.
    In this time of increasing international involvement, one cannot but be struck by the fact of sharply different traditions concerning art and its practice.3 Recognizing that the arts are a salient part of every culture may lead us to wonder about their features and may make us curious about how and why the arts of other cultures differ from what we find more familiar. Perhaps we hope that the arts will offer us some insight into different cultures and their (...)
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  17. Cultural Diversity, Multiculturalism, and the Challenge of the Ageing Population.Andrzej Klimczuk - 2017 - In Hüseyn Qarasov (ed.), Materials of International Scientific Conference. Nurlar. pp. 150--152.
    A. Klimczuk, Cultural Diversity, Multiculturalism, and the Challenge of the Ageing Population, [in:] H. Qarasov, Materials of International Scientific Conference "Multiculturalism and Human Rights" Dedicated to the Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, NURLAR, Baku 2017, pp. 150-152.
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  18. Book Review: Cultural Development of Mathematical Ideas, Written by Geoffrey B. Saxe. [REVIEW]Karenleigh A. Overmann - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 14 (3-4):331-333.
    A review of Geoffrey B. Saxe, Cultural Development of Mathematical Ideas. Saxe offers a comprehensive treatment of social and linguistic change in the number systems used for economic exchange in the Oksapmin community of Papua New Guinea. By taking the cognition-is-social approach, Saxe positions himself within emerging perspectives that view cognition as enacted, situated, and extended. The approach is somewhat risky in that sociality surely does not exhaust cognition. Brains, bodies, and materiality also contribute to cognition—causally at least, and possibly (...)
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  19. A Rediscovery of Scientific Collections as Material Heritage? The Case of University Collections in Germany.David Ludwig & Cornelia Weber - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):652-659.
    The purpose of this article is twofold: on the one hand, we present the outlines of a history of university collections in Germany. On the other hand, we discuss this history as a case study of the changing attitudes of the sciences towards their material heritage. Based on data from 1094 German university collections, we distinguish three periods that are by no means homogeneous but offer a helpful starting point for a discussion of the entangled institutional and epistemic factors (...)
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  20.  83
    Corporate Culture as One of the Key Factors of Effective Industrial Enterprise Development.Anna Shutaleva - 2020 - IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering 966: 012132.
    The article is focused on the investigation of the impact the corporate culture makes on industrial enterprise development. It demonstrates that the formation of the corporate culture principles contributes to raising the level of staff involvement, its labor activity performance, maintaining and reproduction of human capital assets of an enterprise. Investments in the development of corporate culture are considered as an alternative to traditional methods of increasing the efficiency of an enterprise in an uncertain economic environment. Corporate (...)
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  21.  32
    Teaching Firefly: Companion Material. A Class Schedule for a Course on Joss Whedon and Philosophy.James Rocha - 2018 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 1:1-3.
    This schedule, provided as a companion to my “Teaching Firefly” article, was used for a sophomore level philosophy course that was populated mostly by non-majors. The original idea for the course was to develop a popular culture philosophy course that would attract students from all over campus, which was meant to both introduce them to multiple philosophical ideas and theories and hopefully convince some of them to major or minor in philosophy. The course was quite successful at drawing Whedon (...)
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  22.  45
    Literary Girls, by K*Thleen St*Ck: Chapter 2, the Low-High Culture Divide.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper is a response to Kathleen Stock’s book Material Girls, by way of imitation. I have attempted to write a faux chapter in the book’s style, identifying four moments in overcoming the low-high culture divide in responses to the arts.
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  23.  52
    Segregated Specialists and Nuclear Culture.Sean F. Johnston - manuscript
    Communities of nuclear workers have evolved in distinctive contexts. During the Manhattan Project the UK, USA and Canada collectively developed the first reactors, isotope separation plants and atomic bombs and, in the process, nurtured distinct cadres of specialist workers. Their later workplaces were often inherited from wartime facilities, or built anew at isolated locations. For a decade, nuclear specialists were segregated and cossetted to gestate practical expertise. At Oak Ridge Tennessee, for example, the informal ‘Clinch College of Nuclear Knowledge’ aimed (...)
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  24.  33
    Is Spotify Bad for Democracy? Artificial Intelligence, Cultural Democracy, and Law.Jonathan Gingerich - 2022 - Yale Journal of Law and Technology 24:227-316.
    Much scholarly attention has recently been devoted to ways in which artificial intelligence (AI) might weaken formal political democracy, but little attention has been devoted to the effect of AI on “cultural democracy”—that is, democratic control over the forms of life, aesthetic values, and conceptions of the good that circulate in a society. This work is the first to consider in detail the dangers that AI-driven cultural recommendations pose to cultural democracy. This Article argues that AI threatens to weaken cultural (...)
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  25. Comparative Legal Cultures: On Traditions Classified, Their Rapprochement & Transfer, and the Anarchy of Hyper-Rationalism with Appendix on Legal Ethnography.Csaba Varga - 2012 - Szent István Társulat.
    Disciplinary issues -- Field studies -- Appendix: Theory of law : legal ethnography, or, the theoretical fruits of the inquiries into folkways. /// Reedition of papers in English spanning from 1995 to 2008 /// DISCIPLINARY ISSUES -- LAW AS CULTURE? [2002] 9–14 // TRENDS IN COMPARATIVE LEGAL STUDIES [2002] 15–17 // COMPARATIVE LEGAL CULTURES: ATTEMPTS AT CONCEPTUALISATION [1997] 19–28: 1. Legal Culture in a Cultural-anthropological Approach 19 / 2. Legal Culture in a Sociological Approach 21 / 3. (...)
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  26.  60
    Role of organisational culture in innovation development of tourism and hospitality enterprises providing.Oleksandr Krupskyi - 2015 - Economic Annals-XXI 155 (11-12):96-99.
    Innovations as a source of competitive advantages for an enterprise are described in the article; the influence of organisational culture and its elements are analysed with regard to finding ways of innovative development. The major problems hindering the implementation of the culture that enables innovations in the hospitality and tourism industry in Ukraine have been identified under own research of 69 hospitality enterprises. It was found out that degree of innovativeness depends on the size of the company, and (...)
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  27. A FORMAL CONCEPT OF CULTURE IN THE CLASSIFICATION OF ALFRED L. KROEBER AND CLYDE KLUCKHOHN.Boroch Robert - 2016 - Analecta 25 (2):61-101.
    The objective of this article is to analyse definitions of culture gathered by Alfred L. Kroeber and Clyde Kluckhohn and published in Culture. A Critical Review of Concepts and Definitions in 1952. This article emphasizes a possibility of re-analysing the material collected by these researchers (Kroeber–Kluckhohn Culture Classification, hereinafter referred to as KKCC). The article shows that the KKCC material constitutes a coherent conceptual and theoretical paradigm. This paradigm was subject to contextual, frequential and conceptual (...)
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  28.  84
    How Does Culture Connect and Contribute to the Sustainable Development? - A Literature Review.W. U. Chaoqun - unknown
    Today, the world is facing many global crises and challenges. In order to limit negative environmental and social impacts, human being had put forward the concept of sustainable development, set goals and taken actions to advance the process of sustainable development. However, scholars’ research on sustainable development mainly focuses on the three major aspects: economy, society and environment/ecology. Only a few articles talked about culture and sustainable development. In order to further promote the development of human high-quality life and (...)
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  29. On the Spectral Ideology of Cultural Globalization as Social Hauntology.George Rossolatos - 2018 - International Journal of Marketing Semiotics 6 (1):1-21.
    Globalization allegedly constitutes one of the most used and abused concepts in the contemporary academic and lay lexicons alike. This paper pursues a deconstructive avenue for canvassing the semiotic economy of cultural globalization. The variegated ways whereby ideology has been framed in different semiotic perspectives (Peircean, structuralist, post-structuralist, neo-Marxist) are laid out. By engaging with the post-structuralist semiotic terrain, cultural globalization is identified with a transition from Baudrillard’s Political Economy of Signs towards a spectral ideology where signs give way to (...)
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  30. Two Cautions for a Common Morality Debate: Investigating the Argument From Empirical Evidence Through the Comparative Cultural Study Between Western Liberal Individualist Culture and East Asian Neo-Confucian Culture.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2012 - In Peter A. Clark (ed.), Contemporary Issues in Bioethics. InTech Publisher. pp. 1-14.
    The paper attempts to set a guideline to contemporary common morality debate. The author points out what he sees as two common problems that occur in the field of comparative cultural studies related to a common morality debate. The first problem is that the advocates and opponents of common morality, consciously or unconsciously, define the moral terms in question in a way that their respective meanings would naturally lead to the outcomes that each party desires. The second problem is that (...)
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  31.  78
    How Artistic Creativity is Possible for Cultural Agents.Aili Bresnahan - 2015 - In Nordic Studies in Pragmatism. Helsinki, Finland: pp. 197-216.
    Joseph Margolis holds that both artworks and selves are ”culturally emergent entities." Culturally emergent entities are distinct from and not reducible to natural or physical entities. Artworks are thus not reducible to their physical media; a painting is thus not paint on canvas and music is not sound. In a similar vein, selves or persons are not reducible to biology, and thought is not reducible to the physical brain. Both artworks and selves thus have two ongoing and inseparable ”evolutions”—one cultural (...)
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  32. MEDIA EDUCATION AND THE FORMATION OF THE LEGAL CULTURE OF SOCIETY.Anna Shutaleva - 2020 - Perspektivy Nauki I Obrazovania – Perspectives of Science and Education 45:10-22.
    Introduction. The development of legal culture and a culture of human rights in the modern world through media technologies, is acquiring special significance in connection with the processes of globalization and the spread of media in recent decades. The purpose of the article is to study the prospects for the use of media education in the formation of the legal social culture and a culture of human rights. Materials and methods. Based on a study of domestic (...)
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  33.  20
    Media Imperative for the Globalization of Nigerian Culture.Stanislaus Iyorza - 2008 - Journal of West African Association for Common Wealth Literature and Language 2 (2):79-96.
    The problem of cultural degradation and high respect for foreign cultures of Europe and America more than Nigerian cultures are the major problems in this study. The paper sets to examine media imperatives for the globalization of Nigerian cultures. The paper answers the question of if Nigeria has a culture in the affirmative and adopts the analytical research method to identify Nigerian cultures, to find out how foreign cultures have affected Nigerian cultures and to explain how Nigerian cultures can (...)
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  34. Extended Emotions.Joel Krueger & Thomas Szanto - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):863-878.
    Until recently, philosophers and psychologists conceived of emotions as brain- and body-bound affairs. But researchers have started to challenge this internalist and individualist orthodoxy. A rapidly growing body of work suggests that some emotions incorporate external resources and thus extend beyond the neurophysiological confines of organisms; some even argue that emotions can be socially extended and shared by multiple agents. Call this the extended emotions thesis. In this article, we consider different ways of understanding ExE in philosophy, psychology, and the (...)
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  35. What’s in a Name? – Exploring the Definition of ‘Cultural Relict Plant’.Erik Persson - 2014 - In Anna Andréasson, Anna Jakobsson, Elisabeth Gräslund Berg, Jens Heimdahl, Inger Larsson & Erik Persson (eds.), Sources to the history of gardening. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. pp. 289-299.
    When working with garden archaeology and garden archaeobotany, the plant material is of great importance. It is important to be able to identify which plants have grown in a particular garden and which have not, which of the plants you find in the garden today that are newly introduced or have established themselves on their own, and which plants that may be remnants of earlier cultivation. During the past two years, my colleagues and I have been involved in a (...)
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  36. The Curious Idea That Māori Once Counted by Elevens, and the Insights It Still Holds for Cross-Cultural Numerical Research.Karenleigh Anne Overmann - 2020 - Journal of the Polynesian Society 1 (129):59-84.
    The idea the New Zealand Māori once counted by elevens has been viewed as a cultural misunderstanding originating with a mid-nineteenth-century dictionary of their language. Yet this “remarkable singularity” had an earlier, Continental origin, the details of which have been lost over a century of transmission in the literature. The affair is traced to a pair of scientific explorers, René-Primevère Lesson and Jules Poret de Blosseville, as reconstructed through their publications on the 1822–1825 circumnavigational voyage of the Coquille, a French (...)
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  37.  76
    Reading Nature Through Culture in Plato and Aristotle's Works on Law.Kirk W. Junker - 1999 - Phronimon - Journal of the South African Society of Greek Philosophy and the Humanities 7 (I):61-72.
    In the human and natural sciences there are many ways of examining nature. While archaeologists, anthropologists and other scientists prefer to examine nature empirically, philosophers and other humanists are more likely to examine texts in order to arrive at an idea of, for example, the Greek world's understanding of nature. Among the scholarly treatises that we typically consider to be sources for research into Greek philosophy of nature and the environment, I selected, for the purposes of this paper, Plato's The (...)
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  38. Cartesian Dualism and the Study of Cultural Artefacts.Terence Rajivan Edward - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22 (2):12-18.
    This paper evaluates an argument according to which many anthropologists commit themselves to Cartesian dualism, when they talk about meanings. This kind of dualism, it is argued, makes it impossible for anthropologists to adequately attend to material artefacts. The argument is very original, but it is also vulnerable to a range of objections.
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  39. Factors That Inhibit Tourism Development: A Case Study of Ababa (Festival) Religio- Cultural Carnival in Oron.Anthony Okon Ben - 2018 - GNOSI: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Human Theory and Praxis 1 (2).
    Religious tourism is as old as religion itself and consequently, it is the oldest form of tourism in the world. Most religions have holy places that people visit from time to time for several reasons. This work examines the Ababa carnival which involves faith- activities, but in a heightened form. It involves pilgrimages to the Ababa holy shrine in Esin Ufot Eyo-Abasi in Oron. This work identifies as a problem, the lack of basic infrastructures and non-patriotic and neglecting attitudes of (...)
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  40. From the Corruption of French to the Cultural Distinctiveness of German: The Controversy Over Prémontval’s Préservatif (1759).Avi S. Lifschitz - 2007 - Studies on Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century (2007:06):265-290.
    In July 1759 the French philosopher Andre´ Pierre Le Guay de Prémontval (1716-1764) published in Berlin a diatribe against the excessive and incorrect use of French in the Prussian capital. Far from being a mere guide to linguistic style, the Préservatif contre la corruption de la langue françoise generated a heated debate, attested by an official threat to ban its publication. The personal animosity between Prémontval and the perpetual secretary of the Berlin Academy, Jean Henri Samuel Formey (1711-1797) was amply (...)
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  41.  74
    The Employee’s Journey to a New Organisational Culture How Employees Experience the Acculturation Process Post-Acquisition.Anne Verrips & Lisette Schoonewelle - unknown
    Aim This thesis aims to develop a deeper understanding of how employees acculturate post-acquisition, its impact on their organisational identity. Methodology This research encompasses a qualitative case study which was developed by following an interpretative, abductive approach that allowed us to work simultaneously with theory and our empirical material. Nineteen semi-structured interviews, conducted at our case company Oaklers Group, together with observations, built the foundation of this thesis. Literature review In our literature review, we are outlining previous research on (...)
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  42.  59
    Book Review Great Thinkers on Ramakrishna Vivekananda by Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture[REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2012 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (6):333.
    This book documents the sublime and deep thoughts of great people worldwide on Sri Ramakrishna and Swami Vivekananda. While some had the privilege of meeting these divine personages, others have been deeply influenced by their life and teachings. A revised edition of the earlier book, this volume contains much new material like facsimiles of the tributes of Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore.
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  43.  79
    Scientific Instruments and Epistemology Engines.Tomáš Dvořák - 2012 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 34 (4):529-540.
    This article outlines the gradually changing attitude towards instruments and materials in the philosophy and historiography of science and confronts contemporary revaluations of the material culture of science with Hans-Jörg Rhein- berger's concept of an experimental system and Don Ihde's notion of an epistemology engine.
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  44. How Change Happens: A Theory of Philosophy of History, Social Change and Cultural Evolution.Rochelle Marianne Forrester (ed.) - 2009 - Wellington, New Zealand: Best Publications Limited.
    It is proposed that the ultimate cause of much historical, social and cultural change is the gradual accumulation of human knowledge of the environment. Human beings use the materials in their environment to meet their needs and increased human knowledge of the environment enables human needs to be met in a more efficient manner. Human needs direct human research into particular areas and this provides a direction for historical, social and cultural development. The human environment has a particular structure and (...)
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  45.  41
    The Big History of Humanity _ A Theory of Philosophy of History, Macrosociology and Cultural Evolution.Rochelle Forrester - 2009 - Wellington: First Edition Ltd.
    The ultimate cause of much historical, social and cultural change is the gradual accumulation of human knowledge of the environment. Human beings use the materials in their environment to meet their needs and increased human knowledge of the environment enables human needs to be met in a more efficient manner. The human environment has a particular structure so that human knowledge of the environment is acquired in a particular order. The simplest knowledge is acquired first and more complex knowledge is (...)
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  46.  86
    The World Without Money: Economic and Socio-Cultural Transformations of the Value Equivalent.Alex V. Halapsis - 2018 - Scientific Knowledge: Methodology and Technology 40 (1):126-135.
    The notion of “worth” and “value” throughout human history was only partly dependent on economic reasons. Arrangements about what is considered an equivalent value/measure of wealth are the result of complex interdependencies of economic, social and cultural factors. For thousands of years people have used precious metals as universal equivalent and main measure of wealth; full-value metal money was, in fact, only reinforced by the authority of state (ruler) evidence of presence certain amount of precious metal. The rejection of valuable (...)
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  47.  57
    Historical Epistemology Meets the Human Sciences.Tomáš Dvořák & Jan Balon - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (1):5-16.
    The paper addresses recent developments in historical epistemology, traces the main inspirational sources that feed this approach, and suggests a possible agenda for closer approximation between historical epistemology and the human sciences in studying thought styles and thought collectives, conceptual and theoretical levels of knowledge and the material culture of science.
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  48.  82
    Concepts and How They Get That Way.Karenleigh Anne Overmann - 2019 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 18 (1):153-168.
    Drawing on the material culture of the Ancient Near East as interpreted through Material Engagement Theory, the journey of how material number becomes a conceptual number is traced to address questions of how a particular material form might generate a concept and how concepts might ultimately encompass multiple material forms so that they include but are irreducible to all of them together. Material forms incorporated into the cognitive system affect the content and structure (...)
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  49.  16
    El Otro Lado de la Técnica: Diferencias y Similitudes Entre Técnica Animal y Técnica Humana.Joan Sebastián Mejía-Rendón - 2018 - Revista Trilogía 10 (18):63-77.
    Animal technique has occupied a marginal position in reflections on technique, and in the philosophical literature there is no strict definition of it. However, it is of great importance to understand the limits and the distinctive features of our own technique. This work argues that it is possible to establish a solid definition of animal technique based on two definitions of human technique (prosthetic notion of technique and material culture) and one particular dimension of human tools (cognitive tools). (...)
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  50. Scaffoldings of the Affective Mind.Giovanna Colombetti & Joel Krueger - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (8):1157-1176.
    In this paper we adopt Sterelny's framework of the scaffolded mind, and his related dimensional approach, to highlight the many ways in which human affectivity is environmentally supported. After discussing the relationship between the scaffolded-mind view and related frameworks, such as the extended-mind view, we illustrate the many ways in which our affective states are environmentally supported by items of material culture, other people, and their interplay. To do so, we draw on empirical evidence from various disciplines, and (...)
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