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  1. added 2015-09-21
    Collective Wisdom and Civilization: Revitalizing Ancient Wisdom Traditions.Thomas Kiefer - 2015 - Comparative Civilizations Review 72.
    I argue that, in one sense, collective wisdom can save civilization. But in a more important sense, collective wisdom should be understood as a form of civilization, as the result and expression of a moral civilizing-process that comes about through the creation and transmission of collective interpretations of human experience and human nature. Collective wisdom traditions function in this manner by providing an interpretation of what it means to be human and what thoughts, skills, and actions are required to live (...)
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  2. added 2015-09-10
    Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.Jane Geaney - 2011 - Antiquorum Philosophia 5:11-30.
    As part of a trend in modern cognitive science, cognitive linguist, George Lakoff, and philosopher, Mark Johnson claim to provide a biologically-based account of subsymbolic meaningful experiences. They argue that human beings understand objects by extrapolating from their sensory motor activities and primary perceptions. Lakoff and Johnson’s writings have generated a good deal of interest among scholars of Early China because they maintain that “our common embodiment allows for common stable truths.” Although there are many grounds on which Lakoff and (...)
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  3. added 2014-05-15
    Laughing in Chinese. [REVIEW]Robert Keith Shaw & Guo-Hai Chen - 2014 - Humor 27 (1):167-170.
    Santangelo, Paulo (ed.). 2012.Laughing in Chinese.Rome: Aracne Editrice. 472pp. €26. ISBN 97888 548 46203. This book of 15 papers is divided into four parts: humor in Chinese and Japanese literary works, examples of comic literature, the moral involvement of humor, and the psychology of humor. Santangelo provides a substantial introduction to smiles and laughter in the Chinese context and also to the papers in his book (pp. 5–28). This structure lends itself to a description and analysis of smiling and laughing (...)
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  4. added 2013-05-13
    论作为道路与方法的庄子之“道”.Keqian Xu - 2000 - 中国哲学史(The History of Chinese Philosophy) 2000 (4):66-72.
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  5. added 2013-05-13
    “存在”、“此在”与“是非”——兼论庄子、海德格尔对人的存在问题观点之异同(“Sein”, “Dasein” and “Shi Fei”: Zhuang Zi and Heidgger’s Opinions on the Issue of Human Existence).Keqian Xu - 1999 - 南京师大学报(Journal of Nanjing Normal University) 1999 (6):25-30.
    The thorny problem, which we are confronted with in translating the term of “Sein”(Being) from western Philosophy into Chinese, highlights the ambiguity, paradoxy and vagueness of the issue of Sein from a specific viewpoint. Although there is no exact equivalent in Chinese for the word of “Sein”, we use several different words to express the meanings consisted in the issue of “Sein”. By comparison we may find that what is discussed by Zhuang Zi using the terms of “Shi” and “Fei” (...)
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  6. added 2013-05-09
    儒家思想与中国传统文化的价值优先观(Confucianism and the Value Priority in Traditional Chinese Culture).Keqian Xu - 2009 - 孔子研究 Confucius Studies 2009 (2):22-27.
    Confucianism has a deep influence on the opinion of value priority in traditional Chinese culture, which consider the value of morality prior to that of utility; the value of moral merit prior to that of intelligent; the value of group prior to that of individuals; the value of peace and safety prior to that of freedom and liberty; the value of harmony prior to that of conflict. This kind of value priority has performed very important and positive functions in Chinese (...)
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  7. added 2013-05-09
    The Abdication of King Kuai of Yan and the Issue of Political Legitimacy in the Warring States Period.Keqian Xu - 2008 - Journal of School of Chinese Language and Culture 2008 (3).
    The event that King Kuai of Yan demised the crown to his premier Zizhi, is a tentative way of political power transmission happened in the social transforming Warring States Period, which was influenced by the popular theory of Yao and Shun’s demise of that time. However, this tentative was obviously a failure, coming under attacks from all Confucian, Taoist and Legalist scholars. We may understand the development of the thinking concerning the issue of political legitimacy during the Warring States Period (...)
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  8. added 2013-05-09
    論儒家哲學之“道”的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of the “Dao” in the Confucian Philosophy.Keqian Xu - 2006 - 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western metaphysic categories. Confucianism emphasizes that the Dao can not be separated with the practice and the history of human being, thus the Tao should be explored in peoples’ social activities and history. They believe that the Tao only lives in the historical tradition and can only be demonstrated by the narrative of history. The (...)
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  9. added 2011-08-26
    Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:151-176.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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