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  1. added 2019-06-06
    Polling as Pedagogy: Experimental Philosophy as a Valuable Tool for Teaching Philosophy.Thomas Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-58.
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the emerging field of “experimental philosophy,” in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons’ intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy—independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to actively engage with the (...)
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  2. added 2019-04-26
    Supervision and Intervision in the Work of Educational Professionals.Irina Ivanyuk - 2018 - Psychology and Psychosocial Interventions 1:36-40.
    The article describes a comparative analysis of research on the approaches and peculiarities of the implementation of supervision and intervision in the professional activity of teachers abroad and in Ukraine. The concept of supervision and intervision in the work of teachers in the secondary school is revealed. The use of supervision and interference in the professional activity of teachers makes it possible to effectively prevent their emotional and professional burnout. It is noted that in Ukraine, for the first time, a (...)
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  3. added 2019-04-06
    人間進化と二つの教育:人間進化の過程において教育はどの ような役割を果たしたか.Hisashi Nakao - 2016 - 現代思想 10 (44):188-197.
    This paper examines the theory of natural pedagogy theory especially by focusing on its explanation of overimitation.
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  4. added 2018-12-11
    On the Difficulties of Writing Philosophy From a Racialized Subjectivity.Grant Joseph Silva - 2018 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 18 (1):2-6.
    This essay is about the loss of voice. It is about the ways in which the act of writing philosophy often results in an alienating and existentially meaningless experience for many budding philosophers, particularly those who wish to think from their racialized and gendered identities in professional academic philosophy.
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  5. added 2018-11-01
    The Truth, but Not Yet: Avoiding Naïve Skepticism Via Explicit Communication of Metadisciplinary Aims.Jake Wright - 2019 - Teaching in Higher Education 24 (3):361-377.
    Introductory students regularly endorse naïve skepticism—unsupported or uncritical doubt about the existence and universality of truth—for a variety of reasons. Though some of the reasons for students’ skepticism can be traced back to the student—for example, a desire to avoid engaging with controversial material or a desire to avoid offense—naïve skepticism is also the result of how introductory courses are taught, deemphasizing truth to promote students’ abilities to develop basic disciplinary skills. While this strategy has a number of pedagogical benefits, (...)
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  6. added 2018-03-06
    Ethical Education as a Normative Philosophical Perspective.Ignace Haaz - manuscript
    Part of education as interactive exercise is related to a community of practitioners, a dialogue based philosophy of morals which supposes ethical normative characteristics of the discourse. This normative layer can be interpreted either in relation to the lifeworld, i. e. to the understanding of the good life. Alternatively, it can be realized in relation to some cultural rights, since a mutual recognition based ethics, aiming at highlighting culture as necessary feature of human dignity, can explain an ultimate goal of (...)
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  7. added 2017-07-30
    Reconstruction in Philosophy Education: The Community of Inquiry as a Basis for Knowledge and Learning.Gilbert Burgh - 2009 - In Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (ed.), The Ownership and Dissemination of Knowledge, 36th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia, 4–7 December 2008. Claremont, WA, Australia: Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA). pp. 1-12.
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by CS Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of disciplinary-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application, to transform the classroom into a community of inquiry. The literature is not clear on what this means for reconstructing education and how it translates (...)
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  8. added 2017-07-29
    Engagement as Dialogue: Camus, Pragmatism and Constructivist Pedagogy.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2015 - Education as Philosophies of Engagement, 44th Annual Conference of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Kingsgate Hotel, Hamilton, New Zealand, 22–25 November 2014.
    In this paper we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works (Denton, 1964; Oliver, 1965; Götz, 1987; Curzon-Hobson, 2003; Marshall, 2007, 2008; Weddington, 2007; Roberts, 2008, 2013; Gibbons, 2013; Heraud, 2013; Roberts, Gibbons & Heraud, 2013) these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines to develop an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did (...)
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  9. added 2017-07-29
    Improving Teacher Education Students’ Ethical Thinking Using the Community of Inquiry Approach.Mark Freakley & Gilbert Burgh - 1999 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 19 (1):38-45.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
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  10. added 2017-01-13
    Assessing Concept Possession as an Explicit and Social Practice.Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (4):801-816.
    We focus on issues of learning assessment from the point of view of an investigation of philosophical elements in teaching. We contend that assessment of concept possession at school based on ordinary multiple-choice tests might be ineffective because it overlooks aspects of human rationality illuminated by Robert Brandom’s inferentialism––the view that conceptual content largely coincides with the inferential role of linguistic expressions used in public discourse. More particularly, we argue that multiple-choice tests at schools might fail to accurately assess the (...)
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  11. added 2017-01-08
    Teaching Virtue: Changing Attitudes.Alessandra Tanesini - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (4):503-527.
    In this paper I offer an original account of intellectual modesty and some of its surrounding vices: intellectual haughtiness, arrogance, servility and self-abasement. I argue that these vices are attitudes as social psychologists understand the notion. I also draw some of the educational implications of the account. In particular, I urge caution about the efficacy of direct instruction about virtue and of stimulating emulation through exposure to positive exemplars.
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  12. added 2017-01-08
    Humility, Listening and ‘Teaching in a Strong Sense’.Andrea R. English - 2016 - Logos and Episteme 7 (4):529-554.
    My argument in this paper is that humility is implied in the concept of teaching, if teaching is construed in a strong sense. Teaching in a strong sense is a view of teaching as linked to students’ embodied experiences (including cognitive and moral-social dimensions), in particular students’ experiences of limitation, whereas a weak sense of teaching refers to teaching as narrowly focused on student cognitive development. In addition to detailing the relation between humility and strong sense teaching, I will also (...)
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  13. added 2017-01-06
    Ethical Competence for Teachers: A Possible Model.Roxana-Maria Ghiațău - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (3):387–403.
    In Education Sciences, the notion of ‘competence’ is widely used, both as an aim to be reached with students and as performance in teachers’ education. This article advances a type of competence that is highly relevant for teachers’ work, namely the ‘ethical competence.’ Ethical competence enables teachers to responsibly deal with the daily challenges arising from their professional roles. In this study, I put forward a definition of ethical competence and I propose a conceptual structure, both meant to support the (...)
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  14. added 2016-10-12
    Pedagogies of Reflection: Dialogical Professional-Development Schools in Israel.Arie Kizel - 2014 - Advances in Research on Teaching 22:113 – 136.
    This chapter discusses a form of pedagogy of reflection suggested to be defined as the dialogical-reflective professional-development school (DRPDS)  a framework that develops and empowers students by engaging them in a process of continual improvement, responding to diverse situations, providing stimuli for learning, and giving anchors for mediation. The pedagogy of reflection relates to dialogue not only from a theoretical historical context but also by way of example  that is, it offers empowering dialogues within the traditional teacher-training framework. (...)
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  15. added 2016-10-12
    The Philosophy of Social Segregation in Israel's Democratic Schools.Arie Kizel - 2013 - Philosophy Study 3 (11):1042 – 1050.
    Democratic private schools in Israel are a part of the neo-liberal discourse. They champion the dialogic philosophy associated with its most prominent advocates—Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas—together with Paulo Freire’s critical pedagogy, the humanistic psychology propounded by Carl Rogers, Nel Noddings’s pedagogy of care and concern, and even Gadamer’s integrative hermeneutic perspective. Democratic schools form one of the greatest challenges to State education and most vocal and active critique of the focus conservative education places on exams and achievement. This article describes (...)
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  16. added 2016-06-20
    Tao of Teaching.Stefan Schindler - unknown1991 - College Teaching 39.
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  17. added 2016-04-22
    Some Thoughts on Thinking and Teaching Styles.Alan Schwerin - 1996 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 16 (1):48-54.
    Descartes provides us with an invaluable framework for thinking critically. And his views on personhood can serve both as a guide for critical thinking and as a means to sharpen some of the concepts central to these programs. My paper is an attempt to illustrate the effectiveness of the seventeenth century Cartesian conception of thinking for scholars today who stress critical thinking in the classroom.
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  18. added 2015-11-30
    Lab Notes: Write-Up of an Experiment in Collaborative Anthropology.Meg Stalcup - 2011 - In P. Rabinow (ed.), The Accompaniment: Assembling the Contemporary. University of Chicago. pp. 132-139.
    What are the actual practices of intellectual co-laboring? In the spring of 2006, we began an experiment in collaborative anthropology. There was a dual impetus to our efforts: a desire to deal head-on with inadequacies in our academic environment; and a strong feeling that the classic norms of qualitative inquiry needed to become contemporary. Collaboration struck us as potentially key to both. We drew a parallel to laboratory experiments. In the textbook version, one begins with a question, formulates a hypothesis, (...)
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  19. added 2015-03-14
    Teaching Philosophy Through Lincoln-Douglas Debate.Jacob Nebel, Ryan W. Davis, Peter van Elswyk & Ben Holguin - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289.
    This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are not inevitable, and we offer (...)
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  20. added 2014-04-02
    A Triage Theory of Grading: The Good, the Bad, and the Middling.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):347–372.
    This essay presents and defends a triage theory of grading: An item to be graded should get full credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially correct, minimal credit if and only if it is clearly or substantially incorrect, and partial credit if and only if it is neither of the above; no other (intermediate) grades should be given. Details on how to implement this are provided, and further issues in the philosophy of grading (reasons for and against (...)
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  21. added 2014-03-19
    Araucaria as a Tool for Diagramming Arguments in Teaching and Studying Philosophy .F. Macagno, D. Walton, G. Rowe & C. Reed - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (2):111-124,.
    This paper explains how to use a new software tool for argument diagramming available free on the Internet, showing especially how it can be used in the classroom to enhance critical thinking in philosophy. The user loads a text file containing an argument into a box on the computer interface, and then creates an argument diagram by dragging lines from one node to another. A key feature is the support for argumentation schemes, common patterns of defeasible reasoning historically know as (...)
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  22. added 2013-11-15
    Constructive Realism and Science Education.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2013 - Journal of Curriculum Studies 7 (28):81-92.
    Constructive realism (CR) is an attempt to overcome the difficulties associated with naïve realism and radical constructivism. There are different versions for CR. In this paper, I defend a particular version of CR. Complexity of reality, on the one hand, and the impact of human mind, language, and culture, on the other, leads to the inevitable contribution of constructs in knowledge development. According to the CR, even if mental, linguistic and cultural side of constructs could not be avoided in principle, (...)
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  23. added 2013-11-15
    Action-Oriented Research in Education: A Comparative Study on A Western and An Islamic View.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast & Mohammad Zoheir Bagheri Noaparast - 2012 - AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC SOCIAL SCIENCES 29 (2):43-63.
    Comparative studies among cultures, particularly Western and Eastern ones, are vital and necessary. In this essay, we are presenting a comparison between Western and Islamic views. The focus of this study is on action-oriented educational research based on Charles Clark’s view as a more recent action-oriented view on educational research. The comparison between Clark’s view and the one we suggest that is inspired by the Islamic view of human action and shows that there are considerable commonalities between the two views (...)
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  24. added 2013-08-21
    Narrative Pedagogy for Introduction to Philosophy.Kevin J. Harrelson - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):113-141.
    This essay offers a rationale for the employment of narrative pedagogies in introductory philosophy courses, as well as examples of narrative techniques, assignments, and course design that have been successfully employed in the investigation of philosophical topics. My hope is to undercut the sense that “telling stories in class” is just a playful diversion from the real material, and to encourage instructors to treat storytelling as a genuine philosophical activity that should be rigorously developed. I argue that introductory courses focused (...)
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  25. added 2012-05-02
    You Are Not Your Brain: Against 'Teaching to the Brain'.Gregory M. Nixon - 2012 - Review of Higher Education and Self-Learning 5 (15):69-83.
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is the (...)
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