Results for 'Galileo'

117 found
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  1.  59
    Galileo's Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina: Genre, Coherence, and the Structure of Dispute.Joseph Zepeda - 2019 - Galilaeana 1 (XVI):41-75.
    This paper proposes a reading of Galileo’s Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina as analogous to a legal brief submitted to a court en banc. The Letter develops a theory of the general issues underlying the case at hand, but it is organized around advocacy for a particular judgment. I have drawn two architectonic implications from this framework, each of which helps to resolve an issue still standing in the literature. First, the Letter anticipates varying degrees of acquiescence to (...)
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  2. From Galileo to Hubble: Copernican Principle as a Philosophical Dogma Defining Modern Astronomy.Spyridon Kakos - 2018 - International Journal of Theology, Philosophy and Science 2 (3):13-37.
    For centuries the case of Galileo Galilei has been the cornerstone of every major argument against the church and its supposedly unscientific dogmatism. The church seems to have condemned Galileo for his heresies, just because it couldn’t and wouldn’t handle the truth. Galileo was a hero of science wrongfully accused and now – at last – everyone knows that. But is that true? This paper tries to examine the case from the point of modern physics and the (...)
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  3.  53
    Hoe Galileo Galilei de Valwet Ontdekte, En Het Verschil Dat Dit Maakt.Maarten Van Dyck - 2021 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 113 (1):81-105.
    How Galileo Galilei discovered the law of fall, and the difference that this makesGalileo’s law of fall is one of the crucial building blocks of classical mechanics. The question how this law was discovered has often been a topic of debate. This article offers a reconstruction of the developments within Galileo’s research that led to the discovery of the law. This reconstruction is offered to make a philosophical point regarding the epistemic status of experimental results: Galileo’s experiments (...)
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  4. On Galileo's Visions: Piercing the Spheres of the Heavens by Eye and Mind.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2014 - Perception 43:1280-1282.
    This bookreview discusses Piccolino and Wades' book on Galileo's impact on contemporary perception science.
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  5. Galileo’s Knowledge of Optics and the Functioning of the Telescope - Revised.Zik Yaakov & Hon Giora - manuscript
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  6. Copernicus, Epicurus, Galileo, and Gassendi.Antonia LoLordo - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:82-88.
    ABSTRACT. In his Letters on the motion impressed by a moving mover, Gassendi offers a theory of the motion of composite bodies that closely follows Galileo’s. Elsewhere, he describes the motion of individual atoms in very different terms: individual atoms are always in motion, even when the body that contains them is at rest; atomic motion is discontinuous although the motion of composite bodies is at least apparently continuous; and atomic motion is grounded in an intrinsic vis motrix, motive (...)
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  7. Seeing and Believing: Galileo, Aristotelians, and the Mountains on the Moon.David Marshall Miller - 2013 - In Daniel De Simone & John Hessler (eds.), The Starry Messenger. Levenger Press. pp. 131-145.
    Galileo’s telescopic lunar observations, announced in Siderius Nuncius (1610), were a triumph of observational skill and ingenuity. Yet, unlike the Medicean stars, Galileo’s lunar “discoveries” were not especially novel. Indeed, Plutarch had noted the moon’s uneven surface in classical times, and many other renaissance observers had also turned their gaze moonward, even (in Harriot’s case) aided by telescopes of their own. Moreover, what Galileo and his contemporaries saw was colored by the assumptions they already had. Copernicans assumed (...)
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  8. Galileo, Viviani and the Tower of Pisa.Michael Segre - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (4):435-451.
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  9. Viviani's Life of Galileo.Michael Segre - 1989 - Isis 80 (2):206-231.
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  10.  31
    Idealization and Galileo’s Proto-Inertial Principle.Maarten Van Dyck - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):919-929.
    Galileo proposed what has been called a proto-inertial principle, according to which a body un horizontal motion will conserve its motion. This statement is only true in counterfactual circumstances where no impediments are present. This paper analyzes how Galileo could have been justified in ascribing definite properties to this idealized motion. This analysis is then used to better understand the relation of Galileo’s proto-inertial principle to the classical inertial principle.
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  11.  19
    L’Erma di Galileo di Vincenzo Vela.Federico Tognoni - 2019 - Noctua 6 (1–2):444-450.
    This article presents an analysis of the bust of Galileo that Vincenzo Vela created for his house and studio at Ligornetto. The work carries symbolic significance in that it was conceived by the Ticinese artist for the pilaster on the right hand side of the principal entrance to the villa, as a counterpart to the bust of Christopher Columbus on the left. It thus served to perpetuate a long-standing literary topos which started at the beginning of the 17th century (...)
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  12.  7
    The Roman Inquisition: Trying Galileo, by Thomas F. Mayer. [REVIEW]Louis Caruana - 2016 - Theological Studies 77 (4):966-968.
    Was Galileo’s clash with the Church about science or about legal procedures that he had apparently neglected? Was he ultimately condemned for heresy or for violating a legal precept by publishing the "Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems"?
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  13. Het conflict tussen Galileo Galilei en de katholieke kerk.Maarten Van Dyck - manuscript
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  14. Could There Be Another Galileo Case?Gregory W. Dawes - 2002 - Journal of Religion and Society 4.
    In his 1615 letter to the Grand Duchess Christina of Lorraine, Galileo argues for a “principle of limitation”: the authority of Scripture should not be invoked in scientific matters. In doing so, he claims to be following the example of St Augustine. But Augustine’s position would be better described as a “principle of differing purpose”: although the Scriptures were not written in order to reveal scientific truths, such matters may still be covered by biblical authority. The Roman Catholic Church (...)
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  15.  91
    Galileo: Realismo En Los Inicios de la Ciencia Moderna.José Gustavo Sámano - 2019 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 14.
    En los orı́genes de la ciencia moderna, es posible rastrear los tres elementos del realismo cientı́fico: el realismo metafı́sico, la teorı́a de la verdad como correspondencia y la tesis verificacionista. Galileo Galilei fue el fundador de la nueva ciencia y se opuso, a lo largo de su obra, sistemáticamente a un claro instrumentalismo cientı́fico que imperaba en su época. Su concepción de la naturaleza y de sus leyes escritas en forma matemática arrojan ideas de naturaleza filosófica que merecen aún (...)
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  16.  21
    Nei Dintorni di Galileo.Oreste Trabucco - 2022 - Noctua 9 (2):257-273.
    This text publishes the proceedings of the presentation of the book of Maurizio Torrini Galileo nel tempo, 2021), which took place on 19 November 2021 at the Museo Galileo in Florence. The presentation, chaired by Massimo Bucciantini, featured interventions by Paolo Galluzzi, Carlo Borghero, Stefano Caroti and Oreste Trabucco.
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  17.  91
    On Galileo’s Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina.Mavaddat Javid - 2007 - Academia.Edu.
    Far from egalitarian, Galileo’s epistemology asserts an uncompromising hierarchy between science and Scripture — an idea he suggests originates with early Christian author Tertullian of Carthage. For Galileo, when the scientific data causes us to disagree with the apparent meaning of scripture, it is not the data that we discard nor is it the scientist whose word is subject to doubt. Rather, whenever a disagreement arises, we always reinterpret the Bible and Holy Fathers such that we can make (...)
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  18. De una controversia entre Galileo Galilei y Cesare Cremonini, por cuestiones de dinero.Giulio F. Pagallo - 2008 - Apuntes Filosóficos 33:77-108.
    El artículo examina un episodio curioso, ocurrido en las relaciones de Galileo Galilei y de su amigo Giovanfrancesco Sagredo -el destacado personaje del Diálogo sobre los dos máximos sistemas del mundo- con el filósofo aristotélico Cesare Cremonini. Estando todavía de profesor en Padua, Galilei entrega al colega y amigo Cremonini, en forma de préstamo, la cuantiosa suma de cuatrocientos ducados. Al trasladarse de Padua a Florencia, el científico confía a Sagredo la tarea de recuperar el dinero prestado. Las cartas (...)
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  19.  17
    L’Italia E Galileo.Carlo Borghero - 2022 - Noctua 9 (2):222-244.
    This text publishes the proceedings of the presentation of the book of Maurizio Torrini Galileo nel tempo, 2021), which took place on 19 November 2021 at the Museo Galileo in Florence. The presentation, chaired by Massimo Bucciantini, featured interventions by Paolo Galluzzi, Carlo Borghero, Stefano Caroti and Oreste Trabucco.
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  20. Experiences and the Bible in Galileo’s Letter to Castelli.Matjaž Vesel - 2015 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 37 (2):123-158.
    The article focuses on Galileo's Letter to Castelli, 21 December 1613. The author analyzes Galileo's hermeneutical principles established in the first part of the letter and his literal interpretation of the passage from the Book of Joshua 10, 12-13, in Copernican terms, in the second part of the letter. Galileo appears to use the Bible as a scientific authority, supporting his Copernican views, and thus he seems to contradict his own hermeneutical principles. The author argues that (...)'s position is consistent, especially if one takes into account the historical context of its genesis, that is, in the context of the constant, theologically-inspired attacks on Copernicus and Galileo and his commitment to the heliocentric world system and in the context of his newly-made telescopic observations and discoveries. (shrink)
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  21.  24
    An Archeaology of Galileo's Science of Motion.Maarten Van Dyck - 2006 - Dissertation, University of Ghent
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  22. The Paradox of Conceptual Novelty and Galileo’s Use of Experiments.Maarten Van Dyck - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (5):864-875.
    Starting with a discussion of what I call Koyré’s paradox of conceptual novelty, I introduce the ideas of Damerow et al. on the establishment of classical mechanics in Galileo’s work. I then argue that although the view of Damerow et al. on the nature of Galileo’s conceptual innovation is convincing, it misses an essential element: Galileo’s use of the experiments described in the first day of the Two New Sciences. I describe these experiments and analyze their function. (...)
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  23.  42
    Un ideal no realizado. La separación entre la ciencia y la religión en Francis Bacon, Margaret Cavendish y Galileo Galilei.Silvia Manzo - 2021 - Sociedad y Religión. Sociología, Antropología E Historia de la Religión En El Conosur 31 (57):1-21.
    This paper will analyze three historical cases (Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei and Margaret Cavendish) that exemplify the complexity of the interaction between science and religion in the Scientific Revolution and confirm the interpretation of J. H. Brooke, according to which, in this historical context –rather than a separation- a differentiation took hold between them. We will hold that although these authors agreed in proposing the separation of science and religion as an ideal, each in their own way made an (...)
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  24.  84
    Tommaso Campanella, Apologia pro Galileo. Apologie de Galilée. Texte, traduction et notes par Michel-Pierre Lerner. [REVIEW]Jean-François Stoffel - 2002 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 100 (4):818-820.
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  25.  53
    History of Science and Science Combined: Solving a Historical Problem in Optics—the Case of Galileo and His Telescope.Giora Hon & Yaakov Zik - 2017 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 71 (4):337-344.
    The claim that Galileo Galilei transformed the spyglass into an astronomical instrument has never been disputed and is considered a historical fact. However, the question what was the procedure which Galileo followed is moot, for he did not disclose his research method. On the traditional view, Galileo was guided by experience, more precisely, systematized experience, which was current among northern Italian artisans and men of science. In other words, it was a trial-and-error procedure—no theory was involved. A (...)
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  26. Natural Philosophy or Science in Premodern Epistemic Regimes? The Case of the Astrology of Albert the Great and Galileo Galilei.Scott E. Hendrix - 2011 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 33 (1):111-132.
    Scholarly attempts to analyze the history of science sometime suffer from an imprecise use of terms. In order to understand accurately how science has developed and from where it draws its roots, researchers should be careful to recognize that epistemic regimes change over time and acceptable forms of knowledge production are contingent upon the hegemonic discourse informing the epistemic regime of any given period. In order to understand the importance of this point, I apply the techniques of historical epistemology to (...)
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  27.  46
    From Water to the Stars: A Reinterpretation of Galileo’s Style.Louis Caruana - 2014 - In P. Lo Nostro & B. Ninham (eds.), Aqua Incognita: why ice floats on water and Galileo 400 years on. Ballart-Australia: Connor Court. pp. 1-17.
    The clash between Galileo and the Catholic Inquisition has been discussed, studied, and written about for many decades. The scientific, theological, political, and social implications have all been carefully analysed and appreciated in all their interpretative fruitfulness. The relatively recent trend in this kind of scholarship however seems to have underestimated the fact that Galileo in this debate, as in his earlier debates, showed a particular style marked by overconfidence. If we keep in mind the Lakatosian account of (...)
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  28.  46
    Mariano Artigas;, Melchor Sánchez de Toca. Galileo y el Vaticano: Historia de la Comisión Pontificia de Estudio del Caso Galileo . xxiv + 225 pp., index. Madrid: Biblioteca de Autores Cristianos, 2008. €14.50. [REVIEW]Michael Segre - 2010 - Isis 101 (1):249-250.
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  29.  12
    Schede-Vittorio Frajese, Il Processo a Galileo Galilei. Il Falso E la Sua Prova.Renato Pettoello - 2011 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 66 (2):377.
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  30. States, Causes, and the Law of Inertia.Robert Cummins - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 29 (1):21 - 36.
    I argue that Galileo regarded unaccelerated motion as requiring cause to sustain in. In an inclined plane experiment, the cause ceases when the incline ceases. When the incline ceases, what ceases is acceleration, not motion. Hence, unaccelerated motion requires no cause to sustain it.
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  31.  56
    Rinascimento, Rivoluzione Scientifica E Libertinismo Erudito.Carlo Borghero - 2019 - Noctua 6 (1–2):182-218.
    The author examines an essay by Maurizio Torrini on the scientific revolution and libertinism. Studying the reception of Galileo’s discoveries in European philosophical culture, Torrini highlights the misunderstandings and instrumental uses that libertines made of Galilean astronomy. The scientific revolution and libertinism had independent paths and even when their paths crossed, no fusion emerged between the two components. Only at the end of the seventeenth century did apologetics unify libertinism and Galilean science into one doctrine to facilitate their condemnation. (...)
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  32. Descartes on Physical Vacuum: Rationalism in Natural-Philosophical Debate.Joseph Zepeda - 2013 - Society and Politics 7 (2):126-141.
    Descartes is notorious for holding a strong anti-vacuist position. On his view, according to the standard reading, empty space not only does not exist in nature, but it is logically impossible. The very notion of a void or vacuum is an incoherent one. Recently Eric Palmer has proposed a revisionist reading of Descartes on empty space, arguing that he is more sanguine about its possibility. Palmer makes use of Descartes’ early correspondence with Marin Mersenne, including his commentary on Galileo’s (...)
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  33. Dr Goff, Tear Down This Wall! The Interface Theory of Perception and the Science of Consciousnessiousness.Robert Prentner - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (9-10):91-103.
    In his book “Galileo’s Error”, Philip Goff lays out what he calls “foundations for a new science of consciousness”, which are decidedly anti-physicalist (panpsychist), motivated by a critique of Galileo’s distinction into knowable objective and unknowable subjective properties and Arthur Eddington’s argument for the limitation of purely structural (physical) knowledge. Here we outline an alternative theory, premised on the Interface Theory of Perception, that too subscribes to a “post-Galilean” research programme. However, interface theorists disagree along several lines. 1. (...)
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  34. How to Reconstruct a Thought Experiment.Marek Picha - 2011 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 18 (2):154-188.
    The paper is a contribution to the debate on the epistemological status of thought experiments. I deal with the epistemological uniqueness of experiments in the sense of their irreducibility to other sources of justification. In particular, I criticize an influential argument for the irreducibility of thought experiments to general arguments. First, I introduce the radical empiricist theory of eliminativism, which considers thought experiments to be rhetorically modified arguments, uninteresting from the epistemological point of view. Second, I present objections to the (...)
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  35. Il Lume Naturale: Abduction and God.Jaime Nubiola - 2004 - Semiotiche 1 (2):91-102.
    The aim of my paper is to highlight that for Peirce the reality of God makes sense of the whole scientific enterprise. The belief in God is a natural product of abduction, of the "rational instinct" or educated guess of the scientist or the layman, and also the abduction of God may be understood as a "proof" of pragmatism. Moreover, I want to suggest that for Peirce scientific activity is a genuine religious enterprise, perhaps even the religious activity par excellence, (...)
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  36.  11
    Per Maurizio.Stefano Caroti - 2022 - Noctua 9 (2):245-256.
    This text publishes the proceedings of the presentation of the book of Maurizio Torrini Galileo nel tempo, 2021), which took place on 19 November 2021 at the Museo Galileo in Florence. The presentation, chaired by Massimo Bucciantini, featured interventions by Paolo Galluzzi, Carlo Borghero, Stefano Caroti and Oreste Trabucco.
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  37. Zwischen Trient Und Vatikanum II: Der Fall Galilei.Michael Segre - 2003 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 26 (2):129-136.
    The Council of Trent and the Second Vatican Council are significant both to Lutheranism and Science. The first inaugurated the Counter Reformation and formulated a decree related to biblical hermeneutics later used as a basis for Galileo's condemnation. The second modernized the Roman Catholic Church and formulated the Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et spes used by Pope John Paul II as a basis for the reconsideration of the condemnation. In both cases, however, the Church of Rome may not have followed (...)
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  38.  51
    Dediche Tortuose. La Geometria Morale di Vincenzo Viviani E Gli Imbarazzi Dell’Eredità Galileiana.Sara Bonechi - 2019 - Noctua 6 (1–2):75-181.
    This study of the history and contents of a hitherto unedited work on geometry by Vincenzo Viviani seeks to present a picture of the scientific environment in Italy in the second half of the 17th century, with particular emphasis on Tuscany and the impact the condemnation of Galileo had on ongoing scholarship. Information derived from unedited or less well-known material serves to illuminate a range of prominent and marginal figures who adopted different strategies for the dissemination of Galileo’s (...)
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  39.  41
    Geometry of Motion: Some Elements of its Historical Development.Mario Bacelar Valente - 2019 - ArtefaCToS. Revista de Estudios de la Ciencia y la Tecnología 8 (2):4-26.
    in this paper we return to Marshall Clagett’s view about the existence of an ancient Greek geometry of motion. It can be read in two ways. As a basic presentation of ancient Greek geometry of motion, followed by some aspects of its further development in landmark works by Galileo and Newton. Conversely, it can be read as a basic presentation of aspects of Galileo’s and Newton’s mathematics that can be considered as developments of a geometry of motion that (...)
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  40. The Jesuits and the Quiet Side of the Scientific Revolution.Louis Caruana - 2008 - In Thomas Worcester (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Jesuits. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 243-260.
    Working from within the Lakatosian framework of scientific change, this paper seeks to gain a deeper understanding of the Jesuits’ role in the scientific revolution during the years of Galileo’s trials and the subsequent century. Their received research program was Aristotelian cosmology. Their efforts to construct protective belts to shield the core principles were fueled not only by the basic instinct to conserve but also by the impact of official prohibitions from the side of Church authorities. The paper illustrates (...)
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  41. Is Panpsychism at Odds with Science?L. Roelofs - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (9-10):116-128.
    Galileo’s Error is a superlative work of public philosophy, particularly as a way of introducing modern academic panpsychism to a broader audience. In this commentary, I reflect on an issue that is prominent, though often with different background concerns, in both academic and popular discourse: what it means to be ‘scientific’ or ‘unscientific’. Panpsychism is not itself a scientific hypothesis, but neither is it (as critics sometimes claim) in conflict with science. Indeed, Goff argues, and I agree, that panpsychism (...)
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  42.  60
    Laboratory Test of a Class of Gravity Models.Richard Benish - 2007 - Apeiron 14 (4):362.
    Ideas for explaining the mechanism of gravity involving the expansion of matter have been proposed several times since the 1890’s. Due to their radical nature and other reasons, these ideas have not gotten much attention. Another essential feature needed to augment the viability of the model proposed here---even more important than matter expansion---is that of space generation. I.e., the production of space by matter, involving motion into or outfrom a fourth spatial dimension. An experiment is proposed whose result would unequivocally (...)
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  43. Copernican Revolution: Unification of Mundane Physics with Mathematics of the Skies.Rinat M. Nugayev (ed.) - 2012 - Logos: Innovative Technologies Publishing House.
    What were the reasons of the Copernican Revolution ? How did modern science (created by a bunch of ambitious intellectuals) manage to force out the old one created by Aristotle and Ptolemy, rooted in millennial traditions and strongly supported by the Church? What deep internal causes and strong social movements took part in the genesis, development and victory of modern science? The author comes to a new picture of Copernican Revolution on the basis of the elaborated model of scientific revolutions (...)
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  44.  30
    Can a Post-Galilean Science of Consciousness Avoid Substance Dualism?R. S. Weir - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (9-10):212-228.
    In Galileo's Error, Philip Goff sets out a manifesto for a post-Galilean science of consciousness. Article four of the manifesto reads: 'Anti-Dualism: Consciousness is not separate from the physical world; rather consciousness is located in the intrinsic nature of the physical world.' I argue that there is an important sense of ‘dualism’ in which Goff’s arguments are not only compatible with but entail dualism, and not only dualism but substance dualism. Substance dualism, in the sense I have in mind, (...)
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  45. Philosophical Geometers and Geometrical Philosophers.Chris Smeenk - 2016 - In B. Hill, G. Gorham, E. Slowik & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.), The Language of Nature: Reassessing the Mathematization of Natural Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 308-338.
    Galileo’s dictum that the book of nature “is written in the language of mathematics” is emblematic of the accepted view that the scientific revolution hinged on the conceptual and methodological integration of mathematics and natural philosophy. Although the mathematization of nature is a distinctive and crucial feature of the emergence of modern science in the seventeenth century, this volume shows that it was a far more complex, contested, and context-dependent phenomenon than the received historiography has indicated, and that philosophical (...)
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  46.  73
    „Nyní jsem hvězdným poslem já“: Reakce římských jezuitů na Galileovy nebeské objevy.Markéta Ledvoňová - 2016 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 38 (4):389-404.
    Vydání Galileova Hvězdného posla vyvolalo okamžitou reakci mnoha evropských učenců, s jednou důležitou výjimkou, kterou tvořili jezuitští matematici Římské koleje pod vedením uznávaného matematika Christophora Clavia. Cílem článku je prozkoumat možné důvody opožděné reakce římských jezuitů, kteří se k nebeským objevům vyjádřili více než rok po vydání Galileovy knihy. Existují důkazy nasvědčující tomu, že i když byli římští matematici nakloněni uznání novinek odhalených teleskopem, nástrojem, který ještě musel dokázat svou důvěryhodnost, byli omezeni přísnými pravidly, která měla za úkol udržet jednotu (...)
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  47. Consciousness and the Laws of Physics.Sean M. Carroll - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (9-10):16-31.
    We have a much better understanding of physics than we do of consciousness. I consider ways in which intrinsically mental aspects of fundamental ontology might induce modifications of the known laws of physics, or whether they could be relevant to accounting for consciousness if no such modifications exist. I suggest that our current knowledge of physics should make us skeptical of hypothetical modifications of the known rules, and that without such modifications it’s hard to imagine how intrinsically mental aspects could (...)
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  48.  80
    Ambivalence and Conflict: Catholic Church and Evolution.Gereon Wolters - 2009 - In Werner Arber, Nicola Cabibbo & Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo (eds.), Pntifical Academy of Sciences, Acta 20. Vatican City: Pontifical Academy of Sciences. pp. 450-475.
    Somewhat traumatized by the Galileo Affair the Church until recently showed low profile in the conflicts with science, evolutionary theory included. The talk presents a categorization of possible relationships between science and religion by distinguishing between "Galilean conflicts", which are about mutually exclusive statements about matters of fact, and Freudian conflicts where an empirical science tries to explain away religion as a phenomenon in its own right. In the light of this distinction I deal with the reactions of the (...)
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  49. Science, Religion, and “The Will to Believe".Alexander Klein - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):72-117.
    Do the same epistemic standards govern scientific and religious belief? Or should science and religion operate in completely independent epistemic spheres? Commentators have recently been divided on William James’s answer to this question. One side depicts “The Will to Believe” as offering a separate-spheres defense of religious belief in the manner of Galileo. The other contends that “The Will to Believe” seeks to loosen the usual epistemic standards so that religious and scientific beliefs can both be justified by a (...)
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  50.  36
    O Galileově životě a jeho atomistickém hříchu. [REVIEW]Jiřina Krausová - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (4):573-579.
    Recenze: Michael WHITE, Antikrist Galileo. Praha: Academia 2011, 344 s.
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