Results for 'border wall'

304 found
Order:
  1. U.S. Border Wall: A Poggean Analysis of Illegal Immigration.Kim Díaz - 2010 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):1-12.
    Drawing on the work of John Rawls and Thomas Pogge, I argue that the U.S. is in part responsible for the immigration of Mexicans and Central Americans into the U.S. By seeking to further its national interests through its foreign policies, the U.S. has created economic and politically oppressive conditions that Mexican and Central American people seek to escape. The significance of this project is to highlight the role of the U.S. in illegal immigration so that we may first acknowledge (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration.Javier S. Hidalgo - 2018 - Routledge.
    States restrict immigration on a massive scale. Governments fortify their borders with walls and fences, authorize border patrols, imprison migrants in detention centers, and deport large numbers of foreigners. Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration argues that immigration restrictions are systematically unjust and examines how individual actors should respond to this injustice. Javier Hidalgo maintains that individuals can rightfully resist immigration restrictions and often have strong moral reasons to subvert these laws. This book makes the case that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Open Borders Without Open Access (Conference Version July 2019).Dan Demetriou - manuscript
    What are libertarian open borders advocates even advocating for? Is it, as the title to Michael Huemer’s influential essay suggests, a prima facie “right to immigrate”? Or is it, as the branding connotes, literal open borders, or a strong prima facie moral right to free movement across borders that entails a right to immigrate? In this paper, I peel apart the view that people have a strong moral right to freely cross international borders, or "open access," from the view that (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. On the Militarization of Borders and the Juridical Right to Exclude.Grant J. Silva - 2015 - Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (2):217-234.
    This work explores the increasing militarization of borders throughout the world, particularly the United States border with Mexico. Rather than further rhetoric of "border security," this work views increases in guards, technology and the building of walls as militarized action. The goal of this essay is to place the onus upon states to justify their actions at borders in ways that do not appeal to tropes of terrorism. This work then explores how a logic of security infiltrates philosophical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5. De-Bordering Justice in the Age of International Migrations: An Introduction.Juan Carlos Velasco & MariaCaterina La Barbera - 2019 - In Juan Carlos Velasco & MariaCaterina La Barbera (eds.), Challenging the Borders of Justice in the Age of Migrations. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 1-13.
    This chapter introduces and discusses the concepts that are in-depth articulated in the volume. International migration is presented here as a test bench where the normative limits of institutional order, its contradictions and internal tensions are examined. Migrations allows to call into question classical political categories and models. Pointing at walls and fences as tools that reproduce enormous inequalities within the globalized neo-liberal system, this chapter presents the conceptual tensions and contradictions between migration policies and global justice. We challenge the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  34
    Border Sovereignty.Alistair Welchman - 2014 - In Politics of Religion/Religions of Politics. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 51-68.
    n Part I of this essay I take a canonical case of political theology, Schmitt’s theory of sovereignty (1985; 1922), and show how Agamben derives his account of sovereignty from an interpretation of Schmitt that relies on the interesting theological premise of an atemporal act or decision, one that is traditionally attributed to god’s act of creation, and that is only ambiguously secularized in the transcendental moment of German Idealism. In Part II I show how this reading of Schmitt can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Healing the Scars of History: Borders, Migration, and the Reproduction of Structural Injustice.Juan Carlos Velasco - 2019 - In Juan Carlos Velasco & MariaCaterina La Barbera (eds.), Challenging the Borders of Justice in the Age of Migrations. Springer Verlag.
    The suppression of trade barriers and liberalization of financial flows inherent to the expansive dynamic of globalization have not extended to international flows of workers. To impede the free movement of workers, restrictive migratory policies have been implemented, and borders have been fortified with walls and fences. In the face of this widespread phenomenon, this chapter presents an alternative consisting of three steps. First, it is noted that in the current migratory context, borders play a key role in reproducing inequalities (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  50
    Contesting Knowledge, Contested Space: Language, Place, and Power in Derek Walcott’s Colonial Schoolhouse.Ben Jefferson - 2014 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 36 (1):77-103.
    Derek Walcott's colonial schoolhouse bears an interesting relationship to space and place: it is both a Caribbean site, and a site that disavows its locality by valorizing the metropolis and acting as a vital institution in the psychic colonization of the Caribbean peoples. The situation of the schoolhouse within the Caribbean landscape, and the presence of the Caribbean body, means that the pedagogical relationship works in two ways, and that the hegemonic/colonial discourses of the schoolhouse are inherently challenged within its (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Open Borders and the Right to Immigration.Peter Higgins - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (4):525-535.
    This paper argues that the relevant unit of analysis for assessing the justice of an immigration policy is the socially-situated individual (as opposed to the individual simpliciter or the nation-state, for example). This methodological principle is demonstrated indirectly by showing how some liberal, cosmopolitan defenses of "open borders" and the alleged right of immigration fail by their own standards, owing to the implicit adoption of an inappropriate unit of analysis.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10. Occupy Wall: A Mereological Puzzle and the Burdens of Endurantism.Paul Richard Daniels - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):91-101.
    Endurantists have recently faced a mereological puzzle in various forms. Here I argue that, instead of presenting a genuine worry, the puzzle actually reveals a common misunderstanding about the endurantist ontology. Furthermore, through this discussion of the alleged problem and the misunderstanding which motivates it, I reveal metaphysical commitments the endurantist has that may not be widely recognized. For instance, she is committed to interesting and perhaps controversial views about shape and location. I highlight these commitments and what they mean (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  11. Wall-Window-Screen: How the Cell Phone Mediates a Worldview for Us.Galit Wellner - 2011 - Humanities and Technology Review 30:87-103.
    The article proposes to model the phenomenon of the cell phone as a wall-window. This model aims at explicating some of the perceptions and experiences associated with cellular technology. The wall-window model means that the cell phone simultaneously separates the user from the physical surroundings (the wall), and connects the user to a remote space (the window). The remote space may be where the interlocutor resides or where information is stored (e.g. the Internet). Most cell phone usage (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Justice Beyond Borders: A Global Political Theory.Simon Caney - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Which political principles should govern global politics? In his new book, Simon Caney engages with the work of philosophers, political theorists, and international relations scholars in order to examine some of the most pressing global issues of our time. Are there universal civil, political, and economic human rights? Should there be a system of supra- state institutions? Can humanitarian intervention be justified?
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   161 citations  
  13. “What Good is Wall Street?” Institutional Contradiction and the Diffusion of the Stigma Over the Finance Industry.Thomas Roulet - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):389-402.
    The concept of organizational stigma has received significant attention in recent years. The theoretical literature suggests that for a stigma to emerge over a category of organizations, a “critical mass” of actors sharing the same beliefs should be reached. Scholars have yet to empirically examine the techniques used to diffuse this negative judgment. This study is aimed at bridging this gap by investigating Goffman’s notion of “stigma-theory”: how do stigmatizing actors rationalize and emotionalize their beliefs to convince their audience? We (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  14. Contradictions at the Borders.David Ripley - 2011 - In Rick Nouwen, Robert van Rooij, Uli Sauerland & Hans-Christian Schmitz (eds.), Vagueness in Communication. Springer. pp. 169--188.
    The purpose of this essay is to shed some light on a certain type of sentence, which I call a borderline contradiction. A borderline contradiction is a sentence of the form F a ∧ ¬F a, for some vague predicate F and some borderline case a of F , or a sentence equivalent to such a sentence. For example, if Jackie is a borderline case of ‘rich’, then ‘Jackie is rich and Jackie isn’t rich’ is a borderline contradiction. Many theories (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  15.  93
    Territorial Exclusion: An Argument Against Closed Borders.Daniel Weltman - 2021 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 19 (3):257-90.
    Supporters of open borders sometimes argue that the state has no pro tanto right to restrict immigration, because such a right would also entail a right to exclude existing citizens for whatever reasons justify excluding immigrants. These arguments can be defeated by suggesting that people have a right to stay put. I present a new form of the exclusion argument against closed borders which escapes this “right to stay put” reply. I do this by describing a kind of exclusion that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Feminist Border Theory.Elena Ruíz - 2011 - In Gerard Delanty & Stephen Turner (eds.), The Routledge International Handbook of Contemporary Social and Political Theory. Routledge. pp. 350-361.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science.Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson - 2012 - American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1263–1275.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to plant science, (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  19. The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses.Laurel Cooper, Ramona Walls, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Dennis W. Stevenson, Barry Smith & Others - 2013 - Plant and Cell Physiology 54 (2):1-23..
    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly-available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (“ontology”) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20. Ontology Without Borders. [REVIEW]Daniel Z. Korman - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    A review of Jody Azzouni's "Ontology without Borders". Azzouni defends "ontological projectivism", a variety of ontological nihilism according to which "ontological borders" are not "worldly". I raise some questions about the view and about his master argument for it.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Semantics in Support of Biodiversity: An Introduction to the Biological Collections Ontology and Related Ontologies.Ramona L. Walls, John Deck, Robert Guralnik, Steve Baskauf, Reed Beaman, Stanley Blum, Shawn Bowers, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Neil Davies, Dag Endresen, Maria Alejandra Gandolfo, Robert Hanner, Alyssa Janning, Barry Smith & Others - 2014 - PLoS ONE 9 (3):1-13.
    The study of biodiversity spans many disciplines and includes data pertaining to species distributions and abundances, genetic sequences, trait measurements, and ecological niches, complemented by information on collection and measurement protocols. A review of the current landscape of metadata standards and ontologies in biodiversity science suggests that existing standards such as the Darwin Core terminology are inadequate for describing biodiversity data in a semantically meaningful and computationally useful way. Existing ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology and others in the Open (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22.  35
    Neural Computation of Surface Border Ownership and Relative Surface Depth From Ambiguous Contrast Inputs.Birgitta Dresp-Langley & Stephen Grossberg - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    The segregation of image parts into foreground and background is an important aspect of the neural computation of 3D scene perception. To achieve such segregation, the brain needs information about border ownership; that is, the belongingness of a contour to a specific surface represented in the image. This article presents psychophysical data derived from 3D percepts of figure and ground that were generated by presenting 2D images composed of spatially disjoint shapes that pointed inward or outward relative to the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Doctors with Borders? An Authority-Based Approach to the Brain Drain.Alfonso Donoso & Alejandra Mancilla - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):69-77.
    According to the brain drain argument, there are good reasons for states to limit the exit of their skilled workers (more specifically, healthcare workers), because of the negative impacts this type of migration has for other members of the community from which they migrate. Some theorists criticise this argument as illiberal, while others support it and ground a duty to stay of the skilled workers on rather vague concepts like patriotic virtue, or the legitimate expectations of their state and co-citizens. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Cross-Border Migration in the Border Area of Jagoi Babang, Indonesia with Serikin, Sarawak, Malaysia: A Case Study of Indonesian Traders at Serikin Market, Sarawak, Malaysia - Opportunities and Challenges.Antonia Sasap Abao - 2020 - African Journal of Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure, Volume 9 (1).
    The World Economic Forum notes that there is an economic gap between Indonesia and Malaysia every year as seen from GDP per capita. The economic disparity between the two countries caused differences in available employment opportunities. Limited employment opportunities in Indonesia cause an increase in unemployment in Indonesia. The high unemployment rate in West Kalimantan is the main cause of the migration of Indonesians to Malaysia with the aim of carrying out economic and trade activities in the Serikin Market which (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Domination Across Borders: An Introduction.Barbara Buckinx, Jonathan Trejo-Mathys & Timothy Waligore - 2015 - In Barbara Buckinx, Jonathan Trejo-Mathys & Timothy Waligore (eds.), Domination and Global Political Justice: Conceptual, Historical and Institutional Perspectives. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-33.
    This chapter explores the different dimensions of domination, including whether it has a structural approach, its relation to race and imperialism, and how non-domination can be institutionalized and achieved at a global level.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  8
    Against Border Patrols.Mariam Thalos - 2017 - In Maarten Boudry and Massimo Pigliucci (ed.), Science Unlimited? Challenges of Scientism. Chicago: pp. 283–301.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  88
    On the Borders of Vagueness and the Vagueness of Borders.Rory Collins - 2018 - Vassar College Journal of Philosophy 5:30-44.
    This article argues that resolutions to the sorites paradox offered by epistemic and supervaluation theories fail to adequately account for vagueness. After explaining the paradox, I examine the epistemic theory defended by Timothy Williamson and discuss objections to his semantic argument for vague terms having precise boundaries. I then consider Rosanna Keefe's supervaluationist approach and explain why it fails to accommodate the problem of higher-order vagueness. I conclude by discussing how fuzzy logic may hold the key to resolving the sorites (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. A Plant Disease Extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology.Ramona Walls, Barry Smith, Elser Justin, Goldfain Albert & W. Stevenson Dennis - 2012 - In Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (CEUR 897). pp. 1-5.
    Plants from a handful of species provide the primary source of food for all people, yet this source is vulnerable to multiple stressors, such as disease, drought, and nutrient deficiency. With rapid population growth and climate uncertainty, the need to produce crops that can tolerate or resist plant stressors is more crucial than ever. Traditional plant breeding methods may not be sufficient to overcome this challenge, and methods such as highOthroughput sequencing and automated scoring of phenotypes can provide significant new (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. “From Museum Walls to Facebook Walls”*. A New Public Space for Art.Gizela Horvath - 2014 - In Gizela Horvath, Rozalia Klara Bako & Eva Biro Kaszas (eds.), Ten Years of Facebook. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Argumentation and Rhetoric. Partium Kiado. pp. 73-88.
    The ‘museal’ approach to art has been attacked from many angles in the last decade; the main issue raised by most of these attacks was that such an approach would promote a certain idea of art which has little to do with real-life or the layman’s interest. Some artists have protested by stepping out of the museum space with projects deliberately designed as non-museum items (performance, land-art, public art etc.). Art, however, is always meant for a public, so, as an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30.  96
    The Logic of the Border.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2014 - Russian Sociological Review 13 (4):18-41.
    In his Science of Logic Hegel purports to give an account of a dialectical logic that generates the totality of being’s fundamental structures. This totality does not exhaust the richness of being, but it exhausts the basis of this richness. Any phenomenon, whether cognitive, scientific, social or political, is based upon some or all of those structures. The paper presents and examines the logic of a structure which pervades each and every phenomenon: the border(die Grenze). It is analyzed as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Hume on Divine Amorality.Jerry L. Walls - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (2):257 - 266.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  84
    "Borders and Centers in an Age of Mobility".David Kolb - 2007 - Wolkenkuckucksheim - Cloud-Cuckoo-Land - Vozdushnyizamok.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  58
    Which Borders?Luke Maring - 2019 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 6 (1):133-146.
    The best arguments for a nation-state’s right to exclude unwanted outsiders actually condemn nation-level regimes of restriction. Two argumentative steps lead to this conclusion. The first points out that the best arguments for exclusion generalize: if they show that nation-states have the right to exclude, they perform the same service for a great many towns, cities, subnational states, and provinces. The second step constructs a dilemma. The right to exclude is important enough to justify the suffering of would-be immigrants, or (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Immigration and Libertarianism: Open Borders Versus Directionalism.J. C. Lester - forthcoming - MEST Journal:9 (2).
    To explain the correct libertarian approach to immigration, a thought-experiment posits a minimal-state libertarian UK and then the introduction of several relevant anti-libertarian policies with their increasingly disastrous effects. It is argued that the reverse of these imagined policies, as far as is politically possible, must be the correct way forward. This framing is intended to counter the tendency for many articles to misapply libertarian principles to the current messy situation on the mistaken assumption that a state need only stop (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  45
    160 Years of Borders Evolution in Dunkirk: Petroleum, Permeability, and Porosity.Stephan Hauser, Penglin Zhu & Asma Mehan - 2021 - Urban Planning 6 (3):58-68.
    Since the 1860s, petroleum companies, through their influence on local governments, port authorities, international actors and the general public gradually became more dominant in shaping the urban form of ports and cities. Under their development and pressure, the relationships between industrial and urban areas in port cities hosting oil facilities evolved in time. The borders limiting industrial and housing territories have continuously changed with industrial places moving progressively away from urban areas. Such a changing dynamic influenced the permeability of these (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Diseases, Patients and the Epistemology of Practice: Mapping the Borders of Health, Medicine and Care.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Benjamin R. Lewis & Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):357-364.
    Last year saw the 20th anniversary edition of JECP, and in the introduction to the philosophy section of that landmark edition, we posed the question: apart from ethics, what is the role of philosophy ‘at the bedside’? The purpose of this question was not to downplay the significance of ethics to clinical practice. Rather, we raised it as part of a broader argument to the effect that ethical questions – about what we should do in any given situation – are (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37. Open Borders.Javier Hidalgo - forthcoming - In Living Ethics: An Introduction with Readings. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  79
    Theology Without Walls: A New Mode of Spiritual Engagement.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    Theology Without Walls - or 'trans-religious theology' - is a theological approach dedicated to reflecting upon the nature of divine reality as it may be revealed in any of the world’s religious traditions, without confining itself to any one in particular. In this paper I discuss some of the basic assumptions and implications of the Theology Without Walls project and suggest that this approach to theology, and to religion in general, promises to help resolve antagonisms and divisions that have long (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Arguing for Open Borders: The Ethics of Immigration. [REVIEW]Andy Lamey - 2014 - Literary Review of Canada 22 (April):12-13.
    The Ethics of Immigration, by Joseph Carens, Oxford University Press, 2013. -/- Joseph Carens is arguably the most prominent political theorist to defend open borders, a view which he did much to make intellectually respectable in a famous 1987 article, “Aliens and Citizens: The Case for Open Borders.” In The Ethics of Immigration Carens again defends the open borders view, but with a new rationale. Whereas before he argued that seemingly opposed philosophies provided converging support for open borders, now he (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Ethics of Border Guarding: A First Exploration and a Research Agenda for the Future.Peter Olsthoorn - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (2):157-171.
    Although the notion of universal human rights allows for the idea that states (and supranational organizations such as the European Union) can, or even should, control and impose restrictions on migration, both notions clearly do not sit well together. The ensuing tension manifests itself in our ambivalent attitude towards migration, but also affects the border guards who have to implement national and supranational policies on migration. Little has been written on the ethics that has to guide these border (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. What the Liberal State Should Tolerate Within Its Borders.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):479-513.
    Two normative principles of toleration are offered, one individual-regarding, the other group-regarding. The first is John Stuart Mill’s harm principle; the other is “Principle T,” meant to be the harm principle writ large. It is argued that the state should tolerate autonomous sacrifices of autonomy, including instances where an individual rationally chooses to be enslaved, lobotomized, or killed. Consistent with that, it is argued that the state should tolerate internal restrictions within minority groups even where these prevent autonomy promotion of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  42. Challenging the Borders of Justice in the Age of Migrations.Juan Carlos Velasco & MariaCaterina La Barbera (eds.) - 2019 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    The volume gathers theoretical contributions on human rights and global justice in the context of international migration. It addresses the need to reconsider human rights and the theories of justice in connection with the transformation of the social frames of reference that international migrations foster. The main goal of this collective volume is to analyze and propose principles of justice that serve to address two main challenges connected to international migrations that are analytically differentiable although inextricably linked in normative terms: (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Emergence of Borders: Moral Questions Mapped Out.Joel Walmsley & Cara Nine - 2014 - Russian Sociological Review 13 (4):42-59.
    In this paper, we examine the extent to which the concept of emergence can be applied to questions about the nature and moral justification of territorial borders. Although the term is used with many different senses in philosophy, the concept of “weak emergence”—advocated by, for example, Sawyer (2002, 2005) and Bedau (1997)—is especially applicable, since it forces a distinction between prediction and explanation that connects with several issues in the dis-cussion of territory. In particular, we argue, weak emergentism about borders (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  30
    Walking Through the Turing Wall.Albert Efimov - forthcoming - In Teces.
    Can the machines that play board games or recognize images only in the comfort of the virtual world be intelligent? To become reliable and convenient assistants to humans, machines need to learn how to act and communicate in the physical reality, just like people do. The authors propose two novel ways of designing and building Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). The first one seeks to unify all participants at any instance of the Turing test – the judge, the machine, the human (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  38
    Global Health and National Borders.Mira Johri, Ryoa Chung, Angus Dawson & Ted Schrecker - 2012 - Globalization and Health 8:19.
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The governments and citizens of the developed nations are increasingly called upon to contribute financially to health initiatives outside their borders. Although international development assistance for health has grown rapidly over the last two decades, austerity measures related to the 2008 and 2011 global financial crises may impact negatively on aid expenditures. The competition between national priorities and foreign aid commitments raises important ethical questions for donor nations. This paper aims to foster individual reflection and public debate on (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Jerry L. Walls. Purgatory: The Logic of Total Transformation. Oxford University Press, 2012.Joshua Farris - 2014 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (1):215--220.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. In Spirit and Truth: Toward a Theology Without Walls.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    Theology Without Walls is a project that seeks to understand the nature of divine reality through an exploration of all the world's religious traditions, without confining itself to any one in particular. In this essay, I discuss why theology has traditionally been done within the boundaries of specific traditions and suggest that, in our time, we are called to a new, more comprehensive, approach to theology.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Need for Walls: Privacy, Community and Freedom in the Dispossessed.Mark Tunick - 2005 - In Laurence Davis & Peter Stillman (eds.), The New Utopian Politics of Ursula K. Le Guin's the Dispossessed. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 129-48.
    The Dispossessed has been described by political thinker Andre Gorz as 'The most striking description I know of the seductions—and snares—of self-managed communist or, in other words, anarchist society.' To date, however, the radical social, cultural, and political ramifications of Le Guin's multiple award-winning novel remain woefully under explored. Editors Laurence Davis and Peter Stillman right this state of affairs in the first ever collection of original essays devoted to Le Guin's novel. Among the topics covered in this wide-ranging, international (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  51
    The Law of Crowds.Illan rua Wall - 2016 - Legal Studies 36 (3):395-414.
    From the Arab Spring and Occupy to the London riots and student tuition fee protests, the disordered crowd has re-emerged as a focal point of anxiety for law makers. The paper examines two recent cases where the UK courts have thought about crowds. In Austin, the House of Lords connected the crowd to an idea of human nature. This essentialist rendering placed the crowd within an old analytical register where it is understood to release a primordial violence. In Bauer, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Plant Ontology: A Common Reference Ontology for Plants.L. Walls Ramona, D. Cooper Laurel, Elser Justin, W. Stevenson Dennis, Barry Smith, Mungall Chris, A. Gandolfo Maria & Jaiswal Pankaj - 2010 - In Proceedings of the Workshop on Bio-Ontologies, ISMB, Boston, July, 2010.
    The Plant Ontology (PO) (http://www.plantontology.org) (Jaiswal et al., 2005; Avraham et al., 2008) was designed to facilitate cross-database querying and to foster consistent use of plant-specific terminology in annotation. As new data are generated from the ever-expanding list of plant genome projects, the need for a consistent, cross-taxon vocabulary has grown. To meet this need, the PO is being expanded to represent all plants. This is the first ontology designed to encompass anatomical structures as well as growth and developmental stages (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 304