Results for 'diamonds'

43 found
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  1. Diamonds Are Forever.Cian Dorr & Jeremy Goodman - 2020 - Noûs 54 (3):632-665.
    We defend the thesis that every necessarily true proposition is always true. Since not every proposition that is always true is necessarily true, our thesis is at odds with theories of modality and time, such as those of Kit Fine and David Kaplan, which posit a fundamental symmetry between modal and tense operators. According to such theories, just as it is a contingent matter what is true at a given time, it is likewise a temporary matter what is true at (...)
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  2. Disappearing Diamonds: Fitch-Like Results in Bimodal Logic.Weng Kin San - 2019 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 48 (6):1003-1016.
    Augment the propositional language with two modal operators: □ and ■. Define ⧫ to be the dual of ■, i.e. ⧫=¬■¬. Whenever (X) is of the form φ → ψ, let (X⧫) be φ→⧫ψ . (X⧫) can be thought of as the modally qualified counterpart of (X)—for instance, under the metaphysical interpretation of ⧫, where (X) says φ implies ψ, (X⧫) says φ implies possibly ψ. This paper shows that for various interesting instances of (X), fairly weak assumptions suffice for (...)
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  3. Efimov K-Theory of Diamonds.Shanna Dobson -
    Motivated by Scholze and Fargues' geometrization of the local Langlands correspondence using perfectoid diamonds and Clausen and Scholze's work on the K-theory of adic spaces using condensed mathematics, we introduce the Efimov K-theory of diamonds. We propose a pro-diamond, a large stable (infinity,1)-category of diamonds D^{diamond}, diamond spectra and chromatic tower, and a localization sequence for diamond spectra.
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  4.  25
    Perfectoid Diamonds and N-Awareness. A Meta-Model of Subjective Experience.Shanna Dobson & Robert Prentner - manuscript
    In this paper, we propose a mathematical model of subjective experience in terms of classes of hierarchical geometries of representations (“n-awareness”). We first outline a general framework by recalling concepts from higher category theory, homotopy theory, and the theory of (infinity,1)-topoi. We then state three conjectures that enrich this framework. We first propose that the (infinity,1)-category of a geometric structure known as perfectoid diamond is an (infinity,1)-topos. In order to construct a topology on the (infinity,1)-category of diamonds we then (...)
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  5. Throwing Away the Ladder.Cora Diamond - 1988 - Philosophy 63 (243):5-27.
    Whether one is reading Wittgenstein's Tractatus or his later writings, one must be struck by his insistence that he is not putting forward philosophical doctrines or theses; or by his suggestion that it cannot be done, that it is only through some confusion one is in about what one is doing that one could take oneself to be putting forward philosophical doctrines or theses at all. I think that there is almost nothing in Wittgenstein which is of value and which (...)
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  6.  70
    The Diamond Net: Metaphysics, Grammar, Ontologies.David Kolb - 2018 - In Wittgenstein and Hegel: Revaluation of Difference. Dresden: Technical University Dresden.
    In the introduction to his Philosophy of Nature, Hegel speaks of metaphysics as “the entire range of the universal determinations of thought, as it were the diamond net into which everything is brought and thereby first made intelligible. Every educated consciousness has its metaphysics, an instinctive way of thinking”. Both Wittgenstein and Hegel see our many languages and forms of life as constituted by different diamond nets of categories/grammars. I argue that both Wittgenstein and Hegel take a non-reductive attitude toward (...)
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  7. Truth: Defenders, Debunkers, Despisers.Cora Diamond - 1994 - In L. Toker (ed.), Commitment in Reflection: Essays in Literature and Moral Philosophy. New York: Garland. pp. 195-222.
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  8. What Time is It on the Sun?Cora Diamond - 2002 - In S. Phineas Upham & Joshua Harlan (eds.), Philosophers in Conversation: Interviews From the Harvard Review of Philosophy. Routledge.
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  9.  97
    Cora Diamond, Reading Wittgenstein with Anscombe, Going On to Ethics. [REVIEW]Megan Fritts - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (1):169-174.
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  10.  8
    Arthur M. Diamond, Jr., Openness to Creative Destruction Sustaining Innovative Dynamism. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2019. [REVIEW]Kelly Kate Evans - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-12.
    The Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine is 90 percent effective in protecting against COVID-19. It would not have been possible without the tireless effort of Professor Katalin Karikó, a scientific innovator fitting the mold of dynamic inventor Arthur Diamond presents in his book, Openness to Creative Destruction Sustaining Innovative Dynamism. Not only did Professor Karikó persist in her beliefs in the therapeutic potential of synthetic messenger RNA over the course of four decades, but she did so despite the criticisms of other scientists (...)
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  11. Cora Diamond: “What Time is It on the Sun?”.Simon DeDeo - 2000 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 8 (1):69-81.
    An interview conducted at the University of Virginia in October 1999, covering Diamond's work on Wittgenstein, nonsense and riddles, moral realism and skepticism, Peter Singer and animal rights, and the role of literature in philosophy. Also collected in "Philosophers in Conversation: Interviews from the Harvard Review of Philosophy", S. Phineas Upham (Editor), Routledge (2002).
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  12.  43
    Review Of: J. Diamond, Jewish Theology Unbound. [REVIEW]Kenneth Seeskin - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):236-239.
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  13. Boxes and Diamonds. An Open Introduction to Modal Logic.Richard Zach - 2019 - Open Logic Project.
    A textbook for modal and other intensional logics based on the Open Logic Project. It covers normal modal logics, relational semantics, axiomatic and tableaux proof systems, intuitionistic logic, and counterfactual conditionals.
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  14. Our Toil Respite Only: Woolf, Diamond and the Difficulty of Reality.Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé - 2015 - MLN 130 (5):1-28.
    In this essay, I read Woolf’s To the Lighthouse together with philosopher Cora Diamond’s writing on literature and moral life, writing marked by her inheritance from Wittgenstein. I first attend to Woolf’s commitment (one she shares with Wittgenstein) to grappling with what I take to be signature issues of modernism: question, quest, and a longing for vision or revised understanding as a way of confronting the difficulty of reality. I then probe Woolf’s engagement with these issues by reading her novel (...)
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  15.  30
    Pro-Generative Adversarial Network and V-Stack Perceptron, Diamond Holographic Principle, and Pro-Temporal Emergence.Shanna Dobson - manuscript
    We recently presented our Efimov K-theory of Diamonds, proposing a pro-diamond, a large stable (∞,1)-category of diamonds (D^{diamond}), and a localization sequence for diamond spectra. Commensurate with the localization sequence, we now detail four potential applications of the Efimov K-theory of D^{diamond}: emergent time as a pro-emergence (v-stack time) in a diamond holographic principle using Scholze’s six operations in the ’etale cohomology of diamonds; a pro-Generative Adversarial Network and v-stack perceptron; D^{diamond}cryptography; and diamond nonlocality in perfectoid quantum (...)
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  16. Wittgenstein on Rule Following: A Critical and Comparative Study of Saul Kripke, John McDowell, Peter Winch, and Cora Diamond.Samuel Weir - 2003 - Dissertation, King's College London
    This thesis is a critical and comparative study of four commentators on the later Wittgenstein’s rule following considerations. As such its primary aim is exegetical, and ultimately the thesis seeks to arrive at an enriched understanding of Wittgenstein’s work through the distillation of the four commentators into what, it is hoped, can be said to approach a definitive interpretation, freed of their individual frailties. -/- The thesis commences by explicating the position of Kripke’s Wittgenstein. He draws our attention to the (...)
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  17. SUSY in the Sky of Diamonds.Rinat M. Nugayev - 2001 - In Michael Ciaran Duffy & Mogens True Wegener (eds.), Recent Advances in Relativity Theory. Hadronic Press. pp. 193-195.
    The host of SUSY(supersymmetry) based string theories is considered. Superstrings are comprehended as possible candidates on Quantum Gravity basic objects. It is argued that superstring theories constitute mainly mathematical progress and can reconcile general relativity with quantum field theory at best. Yet they cannot provide the genuine synthesis. Superstring unification of all the four forces at hand is a formal one . It is contended that genesis and proliferation of superstrings can better be described not by philosophy of science models (...)
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  18. The New Wittgenstein: A Critique.Ian Proops - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):375–404.
    A critique of Cora Diamond's influential approach to reading Wittgenstein's Tractatus. According to Diamond, the Tractatus contains no substantive philosophical theses, but is rather merely an especially subtle and sophisticated exercise in the unmasking of nonsense. I argue that no remotely convincing case for this interpretive thesis has yet been made--either by Diamond herself, or by the numerous defenders of this so-called "resolute" reading (so-called by those who wish to style themselves as resolute; their opponents tend to reject this characterization (...)
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  19. An Alternative to the Orthodoxy in Animal Ethics? Limits and Merits of the Wittgensteinian Critique of Moral Individualism.Susana Monsó & Herwig Grimm - 2019 - Animals 12 (9):1057.
    In this paper, we analyse the Wittgensteinian critique of the orthodoxy in animal ethics that has been championed by Cora Diamond and Alice Crary. While Crary frames it as a critique of “moral individualism”, we show that their criticism applies most prominently to certain forms of moral individualism (namely, those that follow hedonistic or preference-satisfaction axiologies), and not to moral individualism in itself. Indeed, there is a concrete sense in which the moral individualistic stance cannot be escaped, and we believe (...)
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  20. Logical Syntax in the Tractatus.Ian Proops - 2001 - In Richard Gaskin (ed.), Grammar in Early Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 163.
    An essay on Wittgenstein's conception of nonsense and its relation to his idea that "logic must take care of itself". I explain how Wittgenstein's theory of symbolism is supposed to resolve Russell's paradox, and I offer an alternative to Cora Diamond's influential account of Wittgenstein's diagnosis of the error in the so-called "natural view" of nonsense.
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  21.  38
    Does the Tractatus Contain a Private Language Argument?William Child - 2013 - In Peter Sullivan Michael Potter (ed.), Wittgenstein's Tractatus. History and Interpretation. Cambridge: Oxford University Press. pp. 143-169.
    Cora Diamond has claimed that Wittgenstein’s Tractatus contains an early ‘private language argument’: an argument that private objects in other people’s minds can play no role in the language I use for talking about their sensations. She further claims that the Tractatus contains an early version of the later idea that an inner process stands in need of outward criteria. The paper argues against these claims, on the grounds that they depend on an unwarranted construal of the Tractatus’s notion of (...)
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  22.  19
    Deleuzian Haecceity and Derridean Arche-Writing as a Stackified Infinity-Exigency.Shanna Dobson - manuscript
    We construct a mathematization of Derridian "arche-writing" and Deleuzian "haecceity." We posit an infinity-categorification of exigency (infinity-exigency), a higher-dimensional visual epistemology (infinity-visual epistemology), and infinity-stack Wittgenstein ladder. We reframe haecceities in terms of diamonds, in the sense of Scholze, and mathematize the haecceity-and-arche-writing reflection as a pro-diamond. As an exercise in infinity-visual epistemology, we validate a diamond infinity-stack time signature and infinity-stack harmony.
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  23.  23
    Deleuzian Haecceity and Derridean Arche-Writing as a Stackified Infinity-Exigency.Shanna Dobson - manuscript
    We construct a mathematization of Derridian "arche-writing" and Deleuzian "haecceity." We posit an infinity-categorification of exigency (infinity-exigency), a higher-dimensional visual epistemology (infinity-visual epistemology), and infinity-stack Wittgenstein ladder. We reframe haecceities in terms of diamonds, in the sense of Scholze, and mathematize the haecceity-and-arche-writing reflection as a pro-diamond. As an exercise in infinity-visual epistemology, we validate a diamond infinity-stack time signature and infinity-stack harmony.
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  24. Is Blameworthiness Forever?Andrew C. Khoury & Benjamin Matheson - 2018 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 4 (2):204-224.
    Many of those working on moral responsibility assume that "once blameworthy, always blameworthy." They believe that blameworthiness is like diamonds: it is forever. We argue that blameworthiness is not forever; rather, it can diminish through time. We begin by showing that the view that blameworthiness is forever is best understood as the claim that personal identity is sufficient for diachronic blameworthiness. We argue that this view should be rejected because it entails that blameworthiness for past action is completely divorced (...)
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  25. Binding Bound Variables in Epistemic Contexts.Brian Rabern - 2021 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 64 (5-6):533-563.
    ABSTRACT Quine insisted that the satisfaction of an open modalised formula by an object depends on how that object is described. Kripke's ‘objectual’ interpretation of quantified modal logic, whereby variables are rigid, is commonly thought to avoid these Quinean worries. Yet there remain residual Quinean worries for epistemic modality. Theorists have recently been toying with assignment-shifting treatments of epistemic contexts. On such views an epistemic operator ends up binding all the variables in its scope. One might worry that this yields (...)
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  26. Unethical Consumption & Obligations to Signal.Holly Lawford-Smith - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (3):315-330.
    Many of the items that humans consume are produced in ways that involve serious harms to persons. Familiar examples include the harms involved in the extraction and trade of conflict minerals (e.g. coltan, diamonds), the acquisition and import of non- fair trade produce (e.g. coffee, chocolate, bananas, rice), and the manufacture of goods in sweatshops (e.g. clothing, sporting equipment). In addition, consumption of certain goods (significantly fossil fuels and the products of the agricultural industry) involves harm to the environment, (...)
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  27. Counterfactual Probability.Ginger Schultheis - manuscript
    Stalnaker's Thesis about indicative conditionals is, roughly, that the probability one ought to assign to an indicative conditional equals the probability that one ought to assign to its consequent conditional on its antecedent. The thesis seems right. If you draw a card from a standard 52-card deck, how confident are you that the card is a diamond if it's a red card? To answer this, you calculate the proportion of red cards that are diamonds -- that is, you calculate (...)
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  28. Counterfactual Desirability.Richard Bradley & H. Orii Stefansson - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 68 (2):485-533.
    The desirability of what actually occurs is often influenced by what could have been. Preferences based on such value dependencies between actual and counterfactual outcomes generate a class of problems for orthodox decision theory, the best-known perhaps being the so-called Allais Paradox. In this paper we solve these problems by extending Richard Jeffrey's decision theory to counterfactual prospects, using a multidimensional possible-world semantics for conditionals, and showing that preferences that are sensitive to counterfactual considerations can still be desirability maximising. We (...)
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  29. McMahan on Speciesism and Deprivation.Christopher Grau - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (2):216-226.
    Jeff McMahan has long shown himself to be a vigorous and incisive critic of speciesism, and in his essay “Our Fellow Creatures” he has been particularly critical of speciesist arguments that draw inspiration from Wittgenstein. In this essay I consider his arguments against speciesism generally and the species-norm account of deprivation in particular. I argue that McMahan's ethical framework is more nuanced and more open to the incorporation of speciesist intuitions regarding deprivation than he himself suggests. Specifically, I argue that, (...)
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  30. Grounding Explanations.Louis deRosset - 2013 - Philosophers' Imprint 13.
    A compelling idea holds that reality has a layered structure. We often disagree about what inhabits the bottom layer, but we agree that higher up we find chemical, biological, geological, psychological, sociological, economic, /etc./, entities: molecules, human beings, diamonds, mental states, cities, interest rates, and so on. How is this intuitive talk of a layered structure of entities to be understood? Traditionally, philosophers have proposed to understand layered structure in terms of either reduction or supervenience. But these traditional views (...)
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  31. Ambiguous Figures and Representationalism.Nicoletta Orlandi - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):307-323.
    Ambiguous figures pose a problem for representationalists, particularly for representationalists who believe that the content of perceptual experience is non-conceptual (MacPherson in Nous 40(1):82–117, 2006). This is because, in viewing ambiguous figures, subjects have perceptual experiences that differ in phenomenal properties without differing in non-conceptual content. In this paper, I argue that ambiguous figures pose no problem for non-conceptual representationalists. I argue that aspect shifts do not presuppose or require the possession of sophisticated conceptual resources and that, although viewing ambiguous (...)
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  32.  79
    How Morality Can Be Absent From Moral Arguments.Benjamin De Mesel - 2015 - Argumentation 30 (4):443-463.
    What is a moral argument? A straightforward answer is that a moral argument is an argument dealing with moral issues, such as the permissibility of killing in certain circumstances. I call this the thin sense of ‘moral argument’. Arguments that we find in normative and applied ethics are almost invariably moral in this sense. However, they often fail to be moral in other respects. In this article, I discuss four ways in which morality can be absent from moral arguments in (...)
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  33. The Everyday's Fabulous Beyond: Nonsense, Parable and the Ethics of the Literary in Kafka and Wittgenstein.Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé - 2013 - Comparative Literature 64 (4):429-445.
    This essay takes up the significance of Wittgenstein's philosophy for our understanding of literature (and vice versa) through a comparative reading of the stakes and aims of Kafka's and Wittgenstein's respective circa 1922 puzzle texts “Von den Gleichnissen” (“On Parables”) and the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The essay builds upon the so-called resolute program of Wittgenstein interpretation developed by Cora Diamond, James Conant, and others, bringing its insights to bear on Kafka's perplexing work. The essay explores the ethical weight of these two (...)
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  34. David Skrbina (Ed.): Mind That Abides: Panpsychism in the New Millennium. [REVIEW]Susan Stuart - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (3):271-275.
    David Skrbina opens this timely and intriguing text with a suitably puzzling line from the Diamond Sutra: ‘‘Mind that abides nowhere must come forth.’’, and he urges us to ‘‘de-emphasise the quest for the specifically human embodiment of mind’’ and follow Empedocles, progressing ‘‘with good will and unclouded attention’’ into the text which he has drawn together as editor. If we do, we are assured that it will ‘‘yield great things’’ (p. xi). This, I am pleased to say, is not (...)
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  35.  90
    Review of Lorraine Daston & Katharine Park, Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 1999 - Times Literary Supplement 5001.
    Curious about the nature of light, Robert Boyle spent a series of late nights taking detailed observations of shining veal shanks, stinking fish, pieces of rotten wood which glowed in the dark, and a ‘noctiluca’ distilled from human urine. Once, report Lorraine Daston and Katharine Park, with "only a foot-boy" to assist him, Boyle put a luminous diamond to the nocturnal test, "plunging it into oil and acid, spitting on it, and ‘taking it into bed with me, and holding it (...)
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  36.  72
    Paradoxes and Their Resolutions.Avi Sion - 2017 - Geneva, Switzerland: CreateSpace & Kindle; Lulu..
    Paradoxes and their Resolutions is a ‘thematic compilation’ by Avi Sion. It collects in one volume the essays that he has written in the past (over a period of some 27 years) on this subject. It comprises expositions and resolutions of many (though not all) ancient and modern paradoxes, including: the Protagoras-Euathlus paradox (Athens, 5th Cent. BCE), the Liar paradox and the Sorites paradox (both attributed to Eubulides of Miletus, 4th Cent. BCE), Russell’s paradox (UK, 1901) and its derivatives the (...)
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  37. Per una po-etica del linguaggio.Chiocchi Antonio - 2017 - Zigzagando - Letteratura E Dintorni:1-35.
    Da Platone e Socrate a Emily Dickinson fino alla filosofia analitica di Wittigenstein Da Wittgenstein a Maria Zambrano fino a Iris Murdoch e Cora Diamond.
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  38. A Critical Study of Alice Crary's Beyond Moral Judgment.Christopher Grau - 2009 - Philo 12 (1):88-104.
    This study offers a comprehensive summary and critical discussion of Alice Crary’s Beyond Moral Judgment. While generally sympathetic to her goal of defending the sort of expansive vision of the moral previously championed by Cora Diamond and Iris Murdoch, concerns are raised regarding the potential for her account to provide a satisfactory treatment of both “wide” objectivity and moral disagreement. Drawing on the work of Jonathan Lear and Jonathan Dancy, I suggest possible routes by which her position could be expanded (...)
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  39. Realismus und literarische Form bei Wittgenstein.Jörg Volbers - 2011 - Scientia Poetica 15:204-233.
    The so-called ›resolute‹ reading of Wittgenstein, most notably represented by Cora Diamond and James Conant, claims that the text of the Tractatus does not convey a philosophical thesis. In engaging with the text and its literary form, the reader is supposed to cultivate an experience which will eventually allow her to confront (moral) reality without any obstructing philosophical abstractions. The article argues that this under- standing of the text implicitly rests on the traditional and highly problem- atic distinction between rhetoric (...)
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  40. FOUNDATIONS OF TIBETAN TANTRA AND MODERN SCIENCE.Christian Thomas Kohl - manuscript
    Abstract. -/- By the 7th century a new form of Buddhism known as Tantrism had developed through the blend of Mahayana with popular folk belief and magic in northern India. Similar to Hindu Tantrism, which arose about the same time, Buddhist Tantrism differs from Mahayana in its strong emphasis on sacramental action. Also known as Vajrayana, the Diamond Vehicle, Tantrism is an esoteric tradition. Its initiation ceremonies involve entry into a mandala, a mystic circle or symbolic map of the spiritual (...)
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  41.  37
    Introduction.Oskari Kuusela & Benjamin De Mesel - 2019 - In Oskari Kuusela & Benjamin De Mesel (eds.), Ethics in the Wake of Wittgenstein. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-16.
    Introduction to our edited volume on Wittgensteinian ethics with papers by Oskari Kuusela, Edward Harcourt, Anne-Marie Christensen, Sabina Lovibond, Alexander Miller, Benjamin De Mesel, Cora Diamond, Lars Hertzberg, Jeremy Johnson, Craig Taylor, Alice Crary, Lynette Reid.
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  42. A Journey to Soul-Touching Research in Social Sciences and Humanities.Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2020 - OSF Preprints 2020 (3):1-6.
    We researchers in the humanities and social sciences, similar to the archaeologists but only less literally, are constantly digging through unknown dirt and even uncharted territories in hopes of finding “diamonds.”.
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  43. Nonsense and Visual Evanescence.Clare Mac Cumhaill - 2018 - In Clare Mac Cumhaill & Thomas Crowther (eds.), Perceptual Ephemera. Oxford, UK: pp. 289-311.
    I introduce a perceptual phenomenon so far overlooked in the philosophical literature: ‘visual evanescence’. ‘Evanescent’ objects are those that due to their structured visible appearances have a tendency to vanish or evanesce from sight at certain places and for certain ‘biologically apt’ perceivers. Paradigmatically evanescent objects are those associated with certain forms of animal camouflage. I show that reflection on visual evanescence helps create conceptual room for a treatment of looks statements not explicit in the contemporary literature, one which takes (...)
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