Philosophy of Education

Edited by Lavinia Marin (KU Leuven, Delft University of Technology)
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  1. A Reply to Peter Boghsonnian and James Lindsay's, ‘What Comes After Postmodernism?’.Russell Webster - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-2.
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  2. El papel de la música en la educación según la Política de Aristóteles.Kênio Estrela - 2018 - Fragmentos de Cultura 28 (n.4):465-471.
    Music is a multifaceted discipline. It has repercussions in the most diverse areas of knowledge. It appears strongly in the development of education and philosophy since antiquity. As a representation of this importance we can find in Book VIII of Aristotle’s Politics an important argumentation about the role of music in the education of young people and adults in the polis. This paper will present an interpretation of Aristotle’s perspective on the role of music in education. -/- .
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  3. An Inquiry Into the Relationship Between Public Participation and Moral Education in Contemporary Japan: Who Decides Your Way of Life?Koji Tachibana - 2008 - In Kohji Ishihara & Shunzo Majima (eds.), Applied Ethics: Perspectives from Asia and Beyond. Hokkaido: Hokkaido University. pp. 26-39.
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  4. The Gap Between Philosophy and the Philosophy of Education in Japanese Academia: A Statistical Survey of the Largest Competitive Research Funding Database in Japan.Koji Tachibana - 2017 - Sentanrinri Kenkyu (Studies on Advanced Ethics) (11):17-32.
    This short article is based on my special lecture entitled "Aristotle and the Philosophy of Education" at Tamagawa University Research Institute in Tokyo on September 19, 2015, through a recording of the spoken language transcribed in written form with some corrections. The lecture delivered on that day consists of two parts: referring to historical research and a statistical survey, the first half focuses on uncovering the fact that the philosophy of education has been slighted both in Japanese and Western academia (...)
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  5. At the Wake, or the Return of Metaphysics.Johan Dahlbeck - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1451-1452.
    We have all been told of the death of grand narratives. We have been told that the days of asking eternal metaphysical questions in philosophy are long since over. When Wittgenstein’s (1953/2009, p. 174) famous spade hit bedrock it reminded us that we had better stop wasting our time on lofty questions without answers. Foucault (1970) prompted us to recall Borges’story of a certain Chinese encyclopedia showing us that there are many ways of ordering the world and that each way (...)
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  6. Do Philosophers of Education Dare Be Inspired by Forerunners Such as Nietzsche? – Transformation of the Mind Towards an Affirmative and Generative Awareness.Henriëtta Joosten - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1418-1419.
    What comes after postmodernism and how will this affect educational theory and, I would add, educational practices? I will take up these challenging questions by interpreting present times as a period of transformation towards a new kind of awareness. Nietzsche—for some the father of postmodernity, for me a visionary thinker who ‘presenced’ what was coming—has already explored this transformation.
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  7. Kant on Education and Evil—Perfecting Human Beings with an Innate Propensity to Radical Evil.Klas Roth & Paul Formosa - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-4.
    Kant begins his Lectures on Pedagogy by stating, “[t]he human being is the only creature that must be educated” (Kant, 2007, 9:441), and he argues that it is through education that we can transform our initial “animal nature into human nature” (ibid. 2007, 9:441). Kant understands education as involving an ordered process of care, discipline, instruction and formation through enculturating, civilizing and moralizing (Formosa 2011). Further, Kant envisages that we should pursue as a species the “moral perfection” that is the (...)
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  8. Creating Scientific Controversies: Uncertainty and Bias in Science and Society, by David Harker.James Elliott - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (3):318-322.
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  9. The Postcolonial Reality of Using the Term " Liturgical " to Describe Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2014 - Journal of Research on Christian Education 2 (23):154-175.
    Homi Bhabha, a postcolonial scholar influenced by the work of Franz Fanon and Edward Said, indicates that identities stimulate a need to negotiate in spaces that result in the remaking of boundaries. There is a call to expose the limitations of the East and the West in an effort to acknowledge the space in-between that interconnects the past traditions and history, with the present and the future. This study applies Homi Bhabha’s theory of hybridity to determine whether the term liturgical (...)
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  10. Mindfulness as a Pedagogical Tool: Kuchipudi Indian Classical Hindu Dance.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2015 - Arts in Religious and Theological Studies (ARTS) Journal 1 (27):33-39.
    Contemplative pedagogy is necessary in the dance world because it can be a very dangerous place without it. Dance students who aim to sustain the so-called “right”body image too often develop a physical obsession that leads to dangers like bulimia and anorexia. Moreover, the stresses of performing on stage, combined with other pressures of daily life, may overwhelm dancers to the point where they might feel depressed or even suicidal. Thus, it is vital to develop a pedagogy that thinks about (...)
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  11. Re-Envisioning Contemplative Pedagogy Through Self-Study.Sabrina D. MisirHiralall - 2016 - Teacher Learning and Professional Development 2 (1):84-96.
    Contemplative pedagogy focuses on creating a sense of presence within educators to effectively educate the whole person through mindfulness in teaching. As I engage in a self-study, I develop initial components for the way I employ contemplative pedagogy. I aim to understand myself as an educator in order to teach effectively. One way to enable particular kinds of understandings is through self-study methodology. The foundational framework that develops through my ongoing self-study may interest those who are unfamiliar with the terrain (...)
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  12. Teaching Philosophy Through a Role-Immersion Game.Kathryn E. Joyce, Andy Lamey & Noel Martin - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):175-98.
    A growing body of research suggests that students achieve learning outcomes at higher rates when instructors use active-learning methods rather than standard modes of instruction. To investigate how one such method might be used to teach philosophy, we observed two classes that employed Reacting to the Past, an educational role-immersion game. We chose to investigate Reacting because role-immersion games are considered a particularly effective active-learning strategy. Professors who have used Reacting to teach history, interdisciplinary humanities, and political theory agree that (...)
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  13. De onwetende meester als voorbeeld - Jacques Ranciere: van praktijk naar principe.Martijn Boven - 2017 - Wijsgerig Perspectief 3 (57):6-15.
    Bestaat de kernactiviteit van de meester erin om zijn eigen kennis uit te leggen en over te dragen? De Franse filosoof Jacques Rancière laat zien dat een gelegenheidsexperiment van Joseph Jacotot ons een ander voorbeeld aanreikt: de onwetende meester. In zijn boek De onwetende meester: vijf lessen over intellectuele emancipatie (Le maître ignorant: Cinq leçons sur l'émancipation intellectuelle) stelt hij dat de onwetende meester evengoed of zelfs beter in staat is leerlingen iets te leren dan de wetende meester. Rancière neemt (...)
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  14. Evil, Virtue, and Education in Kant.Paul Formosa - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    For Kant, we cannot understand how to approach moral education without confronting the radical evil of humanity. But if we start out, as Kant thinks we do, from a morally corrupt state, how can we make moral progress? In response, I explore in this paper Kant’s gradualist and revolutionary accounts of moral progress. These differing accounts of progress raise two key questions in the literature: are these accounts compatible and which type of progress comes first? Against other views in the (...)
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  15. Making Sense in Education: Deleuze on Thinking Against Common Sense.Itay Snir - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):299-311.
    According to a widespread view, one of the most important roles of education is the nurturing of common sense. In this article I turn to Gilles Deleuze’s concept of sense to develop a contrary view of education—one that views education as a radical challenge to common sense. The discussion will centre on the relation of sense and common sense to thinking. Although adherents of common sense refer to it as the basis of all thought and appeal to critical thinking as (...)
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  16. The Socratic Note Taking Technique.Mark Walker, David Trafimow & Jamie Bronstein - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (3):341-365.
    The notion of Socratic Note Taking is introduced to enhance students’ learning from assigned readings. SNT features students asking questions and answering their own questions while doing the readings. To test the effectiveness of SNT, half the students from two sections of a philosophy course were assigned SNT on alternating weeks. Quizzes each week alternated between the two classes as either high or low stakes in a counterbalanced format. The design was a 2 x 2 x 2 within-participants factorial. On (...)
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  17. Understanding the Role and Nature of Intuition in Philosophical Inquiry.Nicolas Nicola - 2017 - Dissertation, Queen's University
    This thesis explores the role and nature of intuition in philosophical inquiry. Appeals to intuition have either been used as evidence for or against philosophical theories or as constitutive features of judgement. I attempt to understand our uses of intuition by appealing to tacit knowledge. The hope is to elicit a picture of intuition as being practical and explanatory. Our reliance on intuition is warranted if we understand it as an expression of tacit knowledge.
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  18. Dewey's Theory of Inquiry and Experiential Learning.Field Richard W. - manuscript
    A discussion of John Dewey's theory of inquiry and what it does and does not imply concerning good educational practice.
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  19. Review of Roger Gottlieb, Joining Hands: Politics and Religion Together for Social Change. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (1):65-68.
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  20. Review of C. Gustafson and P. Juviler (Eds.) Religion and Human Rights: Competing Claims? [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2000 - Teaching Philosophy 23 (4):384-387.
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  21. Review of Philip Cole, Philosophies of Exclusion: Liberal Political Theory and Immigration. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (2):165-169.
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  22. Reasoning, Science, and the Ghost Hunt.W. John Koolage & Timothy Hansel - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (2):201-229.
    This paper details how ghost hunting, as a set of learning activities, can be used to enhance critical thinking and philosophy of science classes. We describe in some detail our own work with ghost hunting, and reflect on both intended and unintended consequences of this pedagogical choice. This choice was partly motivated by students’ lack of familiarity with science and philosophic questions about it. We offer reflections on our three different implementations of the ghost hunting activities. In addition, we discuss (...)
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  23. A Course in Metaphilosophy for Undergraduates.Renée Smith - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (1):57-85.
    This paper describes an undergraduate course in metaphilosophy for philosophy majors and argues that there are four potential benefits to students; namely that doing metaphilosophy allows students to draw their own conclusions about what philosophy is, develops students’ metacognitive skills to promote learning, establishes students as members of the philosophical community, and disposes students to live lives that reflect their philosophical education. It describes issues of transparency of course design and the particulars of the course, including course content, and provides (...)
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  24. From Blended Learning to Learning Onlife : ICTs, Time and Access in Higher Education.Anders Norberg - unknown
    Information and Communication Technologies, ICTs, has now for decades being increasingly taken into use for higher education, enabling distance learning, e-learning and online learning, mainly in parallel to mainstream educational practise. The concept Blended learning aims at the integration of ICTs with these existing educational practices. The term is frequently used, but there is no agreed-upon definition. The general aim of this dissertation is to identify new possible perspectives on ICTs and access to higher education, for negotiating the dichotomy between (...)
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  25. Teaching the Debate.Brian Besong - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):401-412.
    One very common style of teaching philosophy involves remaining publicly neutral regarding the views being debated—a technique commonly styled ‘teaching the debate.’ This paper seeks to survey evidence from the literature in social psychology that suggests teaching the debate naturally lends itself to student skepticism toward the philosophical views presented. In contrast, research suggests that presenting one’s own views alongside teaching the debate in question—or ‘engaging the debate’—can effectively avoid eliciting skeptical attitudes among students without sacrificing desirable pedagogical outcomes. Thus, (...)
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  26. Free Will and Education.Johannes Giesinger - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 44 (4):515-528.
    It is commonly assumed that to educate means to control or guide a person's acting and development. On the other hand, it is often presupposed that the addressees of education must be seen as being endowed with free will. The question raised in this paper is whether these two assumptions are compatible. It might seem that if the learner is free in her will, she cannot be educated; however, if she is successfully educated, then it is doubtful whether she can (...)
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  27. Why General Education? Peters, Hirst and History.John White - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):123-141.
    Richard Peters argued for a general education based largely on the study of truth-seeking subjects for its own sake. His arguments have long been acknowledged as problematic. There are also difficulties with Paul Hirst's arguments for a liberal education, which in part overlap with Peters'. Where justification fails, can historical explanation illuminate? Peters was influenced by the prevailing idea that a secondary education should be based on traditional, largely knowledge-orientated subjects, pursued for intrinsic as well as practical ends. Does history (...)
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  28. Mindfulness and the Therapeutic Function of Education.Terry Hyland - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (1):119-131.
    Although it has been given qualified approval by a number of philosophers of education, the so-called ‘therapeutic turn’ in education has been the subject of criticism by several commentators on post-compulsory and adult learning over the last few years. A key feature of this alleged development in recent educational policy is said to be the replacement of the traditional goals of knowledge and understanding with personal and social objectives concerned with enhancing and developing confidence and self-esteem in learners. After offering (...)
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  29. "Sexual Harassment: An Introduction to the Conceptual and Ethical Issues," by Keith Dromm. [REVIEW]Debra Jackson - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (1):85-88.
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  30. Philosophy of Computer Science: An Introductory Course.William J. Rapaport - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (4):319-341.
    There are many branches of philosophy called “the philosophy of X,” where X = disciplines ranging from history to physics. The philosophy of artificial intelligence has a long history, and there are many courses and texts with that title. Surprisingly, the philosophy of computer science is not nearly as well-developed. This article proposes topics that might constitute the philosophy of computer science and describes a course covering those topics, along with suggested readings and assignments.
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  31. The Nozick Game.Galen Barry - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (1):1-10.
    In this article I introduce a simple classroom exercise intended to help students better understand Robert Nozick’s famous Wilt Chamberlain thought experiment. I outline the setup and rules of the Basic Version of the Game and explain its primary pedagogical benefits. I then offer several more sophisticated versions of the Game which can help to illustrate the difference between Nozick’s libertarianism and luck egalitarianism.
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  32. How to Teach Philosophy of Mind.Renée Smith - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):177-207.
    The most notable contributions to contemporary philosophy of mind have been written by philosophers of mind for philosophers of mind. Without a good understanding of the historical framework, the technical terminology, the philosophical methodology, and the nature of the philosophical problems themselves, not only do undergraduate students face a difficult challenge when taking a first course in philosophy of mind, but instructors lacking specialized knowledge in this field might be put off from teaching the course. This paper is intended to (...)
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  33. Catholic Education and the Bureaucratic Usurpation of Grace.Tracey A. Rowland - 2014 - Solidarity: The Journal of Catholic Social 4 (1):Article 3.
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  34. The Cathedral of Being: Re-Enchantment and the Writings of the Popes.Robert Tilley - 2015 - Solidarity: The Journal of Catholic Social Thought and Secular Ethics 5 (1):Article 2.
    A rarely discussed issue that bears upon the topic of education is that which takes seriously the relationship between medium and message; how is the content of what is taught shaped by the way in which it is taught? It is a question of especial pertinence today when in all areas of pedagogy we find people advocating the use in education not only of computers but on-line access and the wonders of the virtual world as well. The argument of this (...)
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  35. Enabling Change: Transformative and Transgressive Learning in Feminist Ethics and Epistemology.David W. Concepcion & Juli Eflin - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (2):177-198.
    Through examples of embodied and learning-centered pedagogy, we discuss transformative learning of transgressive topics. We begin with a taxonomy of types of learning our students undergo as they resolve inconsistencies among their pre-existing beliefs and the material they confront in our course on feminist ethics and epistemology. We then discuss ways to help students maximize their learning while confronting internal inconsistencies. While we focus on feminist topics, our approach is broad enough to be relevant to anyone teaching a transgressive or (...)
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  36. Los desafíos éticos del discurso político-educativo costarricense en el periodo 2006-2010, basados en el pensamiento dialógico de Martin Buber y el planteamiento de alteridad de Emmanuel Levinas.Esteban J. Beltrán Ulate - 2017 - Revista Educación 41 (1):1-25.
    El presente reporte de investigación muestra, de manera sintética, los resultados de una pesquisa presentada en el 2012 para optar por el grado de Licenciatura en Docencia en la Universidad Estatal a Distancia. La exploración de los desafíos éticos en el contexto educativo costarricense desde el planteamiento de Martin Buber y Emmanuel Lévinas es lo que pretende formular la presente investigación, procurando aportar al diálogo nacional el insumo de un elemento filosófico innovador, tenor de un impulso en futuros planteamientos educativos (...)
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  37. The Limits of Mindfulness: Emerging Issues for Education.Terry Hyland - 2016 - British Journal of Educational Studies 64 (1):97-117.
    Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) are being actively implemented in a wide range of fields – psychology, mind/body health care and education at all levels – and there is growing evidence of their effectiveness in aiding present-moment focus, fostering emotional stability, and enhancing general mind/body well-being. However, as often happens with popular innovations, the burgeoning interest in and appeal of mindfulness practice has led to a reductionism and commodification – popularly labelled ‘McMindfulness’ – of the underpinning principles and ethical foundations of such (...)
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  38. What Quantum Mechanics Doesn't Show.Justin P. McBrayer & Dugald Owen - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):163-176.
    Students often invoke quantum mechanics in class or papers to make philosophical points. This tendency has been encouraged by pop culture influences like the film What the Bleep do We Know? There is little merit to most of these putative implications. However, it is difficult for philosophy teachers unfamiliar with quantum mechanics to handle these supposed implications in a clear and careful way. This paper is a philosophy of science version of MythBusters. We offer a brief primer on the nature (...)
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  39. Enabling Change: Transformative and Transgressive Learning in Feminist Ethics and Epistemology.David Concepcion & Juli Thorson Elin - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (2):177-198.
    Through examples of embodied and learning -centered pedagogy, we discuss transformative learning of transgressive topics. We begin with a taxonomy of types of learning our students undergo as they resolve inconsistencies among their pre-existing beliefs and the material they confront in our course on feminist ethics and epistemology. We then discuss ways to help students maximize their learning while confronting internal inconsistencies. While we focus on feminist topics, our approach is broad enough to be relevant to anyone teaching a transgressive (...)
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  40. Education for Moral Integrity.Albert W. Musschenga - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (2):219-235.
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  41. HMI and OFSTED : Evolution or Revolution in School Inspection.John Lee & Johh Fitz - 1997 - British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (1):39-52.
    HMI and Ofsted modes of school inpection are described and compared. The links between these modes are stressed. The information gathering capacity of Ofsted enables it to formulate specific and authoritative advice on good curriculum and pedagogic practice and thus to influence the direction of education policy and steer the system generally.
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  42. Free: Why Science Hasn’T Disproved Free Will, by Alfred R. Mele.Andrew Kissel - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):354-358.
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  43. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers, Ed. Sara Goering, Nicholas J. Shudak, and Thomas E. Wartenberg. [REVIEW]Christina Hendricks - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (3):339-343.
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  44. The Four-Sentence Paper.Dennis Earl - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (1):49-76.
    They say that argumentative writing skills are best learned through writing argumentative essays. I say that while this is excellent practice for argumentative writing, an important exercise to practice structuring such essays and build critical thinking skills simultaneously is what I call the four-sentence paper. The exercise has the template They say..., I say..., one might object..., I reply... One might object that the assignment oversimplifies argumentative writing, stifles creativity, promotes an adversarial attitude, or that students can’t consider objections well (...)
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  45. China Confronts Kant When University Students Experience the Angst of Freedom.Robert Keith Shaw - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (6).
    An existential interpretation of student angst in Chinese universities raises issues of autonomy and freedom. The governance arrangements in China create a conflict for Chinese students who in their coursework are urged to become critical-minded and open-minded. In this essay, Kant’s moral theory provides access to this phenomenon. His theory of duty–rationality–autonomy–freedom relates the liberty of thought to principled action. Kantian ideals still influence western business and university practice and they become relevant in China as that country modernises. The abilities (...)
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  46. Why We Need the Arts: John Macmurray on Education and the Emotions.Esther McIntosh - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (1):47-60.
    This article argues that Macmurray’s work on education is deserving of serious consideration, because it offers an account of the person that highlights the significance of the emotions and the arts. In particular, the article examines and teases out the areas of Macmurray’s concept of the person that are pertinent to the philosophy of education, which includes the contention that the emotions can and should be educated. Furthermore, on the basis of Macmurray’s work, this article argues that emotional competency is (...)
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  47. Philosophy in the Middle Ages: The Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Traditions (3rd Ed.). [REVIEW]Seamus O'Neill - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (4):439-444.
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  48. Education and Life's Meaning.Anders Schinkel, Doret J. Ruyter & Aharon Aviram - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (2):n/a-n/a.
    There are deep connections between education and the question of life's meaning, which derive, ultimately, from the fact that, for human beings, how to live—and therefore, how to raise one's children—is not a given but a question. One might see the meaning of life as constitutive of the meaning of education, and answers to the question of life's meaning might be seen as justifying education. Our focus, however, lies on the contributory relation: our primary purpose is to investigate whether and (...)
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  49. Thoughts on Film: Critically Engaging with Both Adorno and Benjamin.Laura D'Olimpio - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (6):622-637.
    There is a traditional debate in analytic aesthetics that surrounds the classification of film as Art. While much philosophy devoted to considering film has now moved beyond this debate and accepts film as a mass art, a sub-category of Art proper, it is worth re-considering the criticism of film pre-Deleuze. Much of the criticism of film as pseudo-art is expressed in moral terms. T. W. Adorno, for example, critiques film as ‘mass-cult’; mass produced culture which presents a ‘flattened’ version of (...)
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  50. The World of Dialogue. [REVIEW]Gilbert Burgh - 2003 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (2):162-164.
    This is a book review of: Thinking Through Dialogue: Essays on Philosophy in Practice, byTrevor Curnow (editor), 2001, Surrey, UK: Practical Philosophy Press, 251 pages.
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