Results for 'Chinese culture'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. 儒家思想与中国传统文化的价值优先观(Confucianism and the Value Priority in Traditional Chinese Culture).Keqian Xu - 2009 - 孔子研究 Confucius Studies 2009 (2):22-27.
    Confucianism has a deep influence on the opinion of value priority in traditional Chinese culture, which consider the value of morality prior to that of utility; the value of moral merit prior to that of intelligent; the value of group prior to that of individuals; the value of peace and safety prior to that of freedom and liberty; the value of harmony prior to that of conflict. This kind of value priority has performed very important and positive functions (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Cultural Differences in Responses to Real-Life and Hypothetical Trolley Problems.Natalie Gold, Andrew Colman & Briony Pulford - 2015 - Judgment and Decision Making 9 (1):65-76.
    Trolley problems have been used in the development of moral theory and the psychological study of moral judgments and behavior. Most of this research has focused on people from the West, with implicit assumptions that moral intuitions should generalize and that moral psychology is universal. However, cultural differences may be associated with differences in moral judgments and behavior. We operationalized a trolley problem in the laboratory, with economic incentives and real-life consequences, and compared British and Chinese samples on moral (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3. Chinese “Dao” and Western “Truth”: A Comparative and Dynamic Perspective.Keqian Xu - 2010 - Asian Social Science 6 (12):8.
    In the Pre-Qin time, pursuing “Dao” was the main task in the scholarship of most of the ancient Chinese philosophers, while the Ancient Greek philosophers considered pursuing “Truth” as their ultimate goal. While the “Dao” in ancient Chinese texts and the “Truth” in ancient Greek philosophic literature do share or cross-cover certain connotations, there are subtle and important differences between the two comparable philosophic concepts. These differences have deep and profound impact on the later development of Chinese (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Laughing in Chinese[REVIEW]Robert Keith Shaw & Guo-Hai Chen - 2014 - Humor 27 (1):167-170.
    Santangelo, Paulo (ed.). 2012.Laughing in Chinese.Rome: Aracne Editrice. 472pp. €26. ISBN 97888 548 46203. This book of 15 papers is divided into four parts: humor in Chinese and Japanese literary works, examples of comic literature, the moral involvement of humor, and the psychology of humor. Santangelo provides a substantial introduction to smiles and laughter in the Chinese context and also to the papers in his book (pp. 5–28). This structure lends itself to a description and analysis of (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Chinese Rune Argument.Barry Smith - 2001 - Philosophical Explorations 4 (2):66-74.
    Searle’s tool for understanding culture, law and society is the opposition between brute reality and institutional reality, or in other words between: observer-independent features of the world, such as force, mass and gravitational attraction, and observer-relative features of the world, such as money, property, marriage and government. The question posed here is: under which of these two headings do moral concepts fall? This is an important question because there are moral facts – for example pertaining to guilt and responsibility (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   190 citations  
  6. 因小得大: 情境论于道德哲学的困难与可能 (Minor Tweaks, Major Payoffs: The Problems and Promise of Situationism in Moral Philosophy).Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture 9.
    This is a translation of "Minor Tweaks, Major Payoffs" (2010) prepared by 黃玉娥 for the Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture for a special issue edited by Brian Bruya on cognitive science and early Chinese philosophy.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Early Confucian Principles: The Potential Theoretic Foundation of Democracy in Modern China.Keqian Xu - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (2):135 – 148.
    The subtle and complex relation between Confucianism and modern democracy has long been a controversial issue, and it is now again becoming a topical issue in the process of political modernization in contemporary China. This paper argues that there are some quite basic early Confucian values and principles that are not only compatible with democracy, but also may become the theoretic foundation of modern democracy in China. Early Confucianism considers 'the people's will' as the direct representative of 'Heaven's will', with (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. A Different Type of Individualism in Zhuangzi.Keqian Xu - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):445-462.
    Although being widely considered as only a Western tradition, individualism is not absent in traditional Chinese philosophy and culture. In some of the classic Chinese philosophic works such as Zhuangzi, we can clearly identify some elements which can be appropriately attributed to “individualism”, such as the awareness of individual “self” as an independent and unique existence, advocating individual freedom and liberty, emphasizing on the value and dignity of individual life, favoring individuals’ autonomy and privacy, pursuing unconstrained development (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Alexithymia in Eating Disorders: A Transcultural Perspective.Stefania Roma & Daniela Alliani - 2010 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 3 (1):8-16.
    The role of alexithymia in eating disorders has been exstensively studied in Western cultures. On the contrary, studies on alexithymia in the Far East are rare, and its possible role in eating disorders is yet unstudied. After discussing the history and the meaning of the concept of alexithymia in Western cultures, the present paper poses the anthropological question whether alexithymia has a different meaning in Western and Eastern cultures. The sinologist literature on the topic of emotions in China is fi (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Rape Culture and Epistemology.Bianca Crewe & Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - manuscript
    This paper critiques a deferential attitude about the epistemology of sexual assault testimony. According to the deferential attitude, individuals and institutions should decline to act on allegations of sexual assault unless and until they are proven in a formal setting, i.e., a criminal court. We attack this deference from several angles, including the pervasiveness of rape culture in the criminal justice system, the epistemology of testimony and norms connecting knowledge and action, the harms of tacit idealizations away from important (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  80
    Gadamer and Levinas on Concepts of Culture.Dimitry Mentuz - 2017 - In Social Sciences in Modern World. vol. 2 (2). Moscow, Russia: Internauka. pp. 88-97.
    In this work, I have compared the views of Hans Georg Gadamer and Emmanuel Levinas on various concepts of culture and understanding of the ‘man’ within the framework of Western civilization with the help of three of their essays. In two lectures of Gadamer—‘Culture and Peace’, delivered at Salzburg in 1980, and ‘Man and His Hand in Modern Civilization’, delivered in Munich in 1978—and several essays by Emmanuel Levinas such as ‘The Philosophical Determination of the Idea of (...)’ (1983). If both authors are critical of the rational based on the technique and calculation of the concept of culture inherited from the Enlightenment, and further, if this concept is embodied in the bourgeois and later in industrial societies, as retraced in the first chapter, the authors differently see the way out of the dehumanizing crisis of the modern era. (shrink)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Human Survival: Evolution, Religion and the Irrational.Milton H. Saier & Jack T. Trevors - 2010 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 3 (1):17-20.
    Is there a possible biological explanation for religion? That is, is there a genetic basis for believing in mystical, supernatural beings when there is no scientifi c evidence for their existence? Can we explain why some people prefer to accept myth over science? Why do so many people still accept creation and refuse to embrace evolution? Is there an evolutionary basis for religious beliefs? It is certainly true that religions have been part of human civilization throughout most of its recent (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. On Charlie Gard: Ethics, Culture, and Religion.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2018 - Journal of Healthcare Ethics and Administration 4 (2):1-17.
    The 2017 story of Charlie Gard is revisited. Upon the British High Court’s ruling in favor of the physicians that the infant should be allowed to die without the experimental treatment, the view of the public as well as the opinions of bioethicists and Catholic bishops are divided, interestingly along with a cultural line. American bioethicists and Catholic bishops tend to believe that the parents should have the final say while British/European bioethicists and Catholic bishops in general side with the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Can Culture Excuse Crime.Mark Tunick - 2004 - Punishment and Society 6:395-409.
    The inability thesis holds that one’s culture determines behavior and can make one unable to comply with the law and therefore less deserving of punishment. Opponents of the thesis reject the view that humans are made physically unable to act certain ways by their cultural upbringing. The article seeks to help evaluate the inability thesis by pointing to a literature in cultural psychology and anthropology presenting empirical evidence of the influence of culture on behavior, and offering conceptual analysis (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  83
    Ontic Indeterminacy: Chinese Madhyamaka in the Contemporary Context.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    A number of analytical philosophers have recently endorsed the view that the world itself is indeterminate in some respect. Intriguingly, ideas similar to the view are expressed by thinkers from Chinese Madhyamaka Buddhism, which may shed light on the current discussion of worldly indeterminacy. Using as a basis Chinese Madhyamaka thought, together with Jessica Wilson’s account of indeterminacy, I develop an ontological conception of indeterminacy, termed ontic indeterminacy, which centres on two complementary ideas—conclusive indeterminability and provisional determinability. I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Idea of Culture and the History of Emotions.Rolf Petri - 2012 - Historein 12:21-37.
    The essay operates an itemisation of the three main streams in the history of emotions: the history of individual emotions, the study of the role that emotions have in historical processes, and the reflection on the influence of emotions on history writing. The second part of the article is devoted to the methodological and theoretical status of the study of past emotions. It highlights how many studies in the history of emotions remain heavily conditioned by an idea of culture (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Right to Ignore: An Epistemic Defense of the Nature/Culture Divide.Maria Kronfeldner - 2017 - In Richard Joyce (ed.), Handbook of Evolution and Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 210-224.
    This paper addresses whether the often-bemoaned loss of unity of knowledge about humans, which results from the disciplinary fragmentation of science, is something to be overcome. The fragmentation of being human rests on a couple of distinctions, such as the nature-culture divide. Since antiquity the distinction between nature (roughly, what we inherit biologically) and culture (roughly, what is acquired by social interaction) has been a commonplace in science and society. Recently, the nature/culture divide has come under attack (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape From a Chinese Room.William J. Rapaport - 2006 - Minds and Machines 16 (4):381-436.
    A computer can come to understand natural language the same way Helen Keller did: by using “syntactic semantics”—a theory of how syntax can suffice for semantics, i.e., how semantics for natural language can be provided by means of computational symbol manipulation. This essay considers real-life approximations of Chinese Rooms, focusing on Helen Keller’s experiences growing up deaf and blind, locked in a sort of Chinese Room yet learning how to communicate with the outside world. Using the SNePS computational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  19. Yes, She Was!: Reply to Ford’s “Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room”.William J. Rapaport - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (1):3-17.
    Ford’s Helen Keller Was Never in a Chinese Room claims that my argument in How Helen Keller Used Syntactic Semantics to Escape from a Chinese Room fails because Searle and I use the terms ‘syntax’ and ‘semantics’ differently, hence are at cross purposes. Ford has misunderstood me; this reply clarifies my theory.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. Quantum Linguistics and Searle's Chinese Room Argument.J. M. Bishop, S. J. Nasuto & B. Coecke - 2011 - In V. C. Muller (ed.), Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 17-29.
    Viewed in the light of the remarkable performance of ‘Watson’ - IBMs proprietary artificial intelligence computer system capable of answering questions posed in natural language - on the US general knowledge quiz show ‘Jeopardy’, we review two experiments on formal systems - one in the domain of quantum physics, the other involving a pictographic languaging game - whereby behaviour seemingly characteristic of domain understanding is generated by the mere mechanical application of simple rules. By re-examining both experiments in the context (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. "If There is Nothing Beyond the Organic...": Heredity and Culture at the Boundaries of Anthropology in the Work of Alfred L. Kroeber.Maria E. Kronfeldner - 2008 - NTM - Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 17 (2):107-134.
    Continuing Franz Boas' work to establish anthropology as an academic discipline in the US at the turn of the twentieth century, Alfred L. Kroeber re-defined culture as a phenomenon sui generis. To achieve this he asked geneticists to enter into a coalition against hereditarian thoughts prevalent at that time in the US. The goal was to create space for anthropology as a separate discipline within academia, distinct from other disciplines. To this end he crossed the boundary separating anthropology from (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  22.  75
    Grounding Grammatical Categories: Attention Bias in Hand Space Influences Grammatical Congruency Judgment of Chinese Nominal Classifiers.Marit Lobben & Stefania D’Ascenzo - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Embodied cognitive theories predict that linguistic conceptual representations are grounded and continually represented in real world, sensorimotor experiences. However, there is an on-going debate on whether this also holds for abstract concepts. Grammar is the archetype of abstract knowledge, and therefore constitutes a test case against embodied theories of language representation. Former studies have largely focussed on lexical-level embodied representations. In the present study we take the grounding-by-modality idea a step further by using reaction time (RT) data from the linguistic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. The Continuous Model of Culture: Modernity Decline—a Eurocentric Bias? An Attempt to Introduce an Absolute Value Into a Model of Culture.Giorgi Kankava - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (3):411-433.
    This paper means to demonstrate the theoretical-and- methodological potential of a particular pattern of thought about culture. Employing an end-means and absolute value plus concept of reality approach, the continuous model of culture aims to embrace from one holistic standpoint various concepts and debates of the modern human, social, and political sciences. The paper revisits the debates of fact versus value, nature versus culture, culture versus structure, agency versus structure, and economics versus politics and offers the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Confucianism, Puritanism, and the Transcendental: China and America.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2011 - ProtoSociology 28:153-172.
    Max Weber examined Chinese society and European Puritanism at the beginning of the Twentieth Century in order to find out why capitalism did not develop in China. He found that Confucianism and Puritanism are mutually exclusive, which enabled him to oppose both in the form of two different kinds of rationalism. I attempt neither to refute nor to confirm the Weberian thought model. Instead I show that a similar model applies to Jean Baudrillard’s vision of American culture, a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Introductory Study. Nietzsche on Culture and Subjectivity.Pietro Gori & Paolo Stellino - 2015 - Quaderns de Filosofia i Ciència 2 (1):11-23.
    Nietzsche’s timeliness is patent in the renewed enthusiasm with which scholars in both the continental and analytic traditions have approached his works in recent years. Along with other topics, attention has been particularly directed towards two important issues: Nietzsche’s analysis, critique, and genealogy of culture, and his stance on subjectivity. In this introductory study we shall provide a brief outline of both these topics. As will be shown, they play a pivotal role in Nietzsche’s thought, and the link that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Logical Hole in the Chinese Room.Michael John Shaffer - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (2):229-235.
    Searle’s Chinese Room Argument (CRA) has been the object of great interest in the philosophy of mind, artificial intelligence and cognitive science since its initial presentation in ‘Minds, Brains and Programs’ in 1980. It is by no means an overstatement to assert that it has been a main focus of attention for philosophers and computer scientists of many stripes. It is then especially interesting to note that relatively little has been said about the detailed logic of the argument, whatever (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  19
    Chinese Religious Syncretism in Macau.Edmond Eh - 2017 - Orientis Aura: Macau Perspectives in Religious Studies 2:63-80.
    In this paper I address the phenomenon of syncretism with respect to Chinese religions. An analysis of the syncretism that takes place between the three major Chinese religious traditions is first done in its personal and social dimensions. The social structure of Chinese religion is then used as a framework to understand how Buddhism and Daoism were made compatible with Confucianism. All this will serve as a background for the case study of Macau, where Chinese religious (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Living Body as the Origin of Culture: What the Shift in Husserl’s Notion of “Expression” Tells Us About Cultural Objects.Molly Brigid Flynn - 2009 - Husserl Studies 25 (1):57-79.
    Husserl’s philosophy of culture relies upon a person’s body being expressive of the person’s spirit, but Husserl’s analysis of expression in Logical Investigations is inadequate to explain this bodily expressiveness. This paper explains how Husserl’s use of “expression” shifts from LI to Ideas II and argues that this shift is explained by Husserl’s increased understanding of the pervasiveness of sense in subjective life and his increased appreciation for the unity of the person. I show how these two developments allow (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. The Abdication of King Kuai of Yan and the Issue of Political Legitimacy in the Warring States Period.Keqian Xu - 2008 - Journal of School of Chinese Language and Culture 2008 (3).
    The event that King Kuai of Yan demised the crown to his premier Zizhi, is a tentative way of political power transmission happened in the social transforming Warring States Period, which was influenced by the popular theory of Yao and Shun’s demise of that time. However, this tentative was obviously a failure, coming under attacks from all Confucian, Taoist and Legalist scholars. We may understand the development of the thinking concerning the issue of political legitimacy during the Warring States Period (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Distance Learning: Empathy and Culture in Junot Diaz’s “Wildwood”. [REVIEW]Rebecca Garden - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):439-450.
    This essay discusses critical approaches to culture, difference, and empathy in health care education through a reading of Junot Diaz’s “Wildwood” chapter from the 2007 novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. I begin with an analysis of the way that Diaz’s narrative invites readers to imagine and explore the experiences of others with subtlety and complexity. My reading of “Wildwood” illuminates its double-edged injunction to try to imagine another’s perspective while recognizing the limits to—or even the impossibility (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  82
    ‘There Are No Such Great Philosophies’: Contested Meanings of Toasebio Parish in Jakarta.Juneman Abraham - 2018 - In Slavomír Magál, Dáša Mendelová, Dana Petranová & Nicolae Apostolescu (eds.), 10th European Symposium on Religious Art Restoration & Conservation (ESRARC 2018) Proceedings Book. Turin, Metropolitan City of Turin, Italy: pp. 33-37.
    This present study aims at exploring the meaning of the building of Santa Maria de Fatima Catholic Church (abbreviated as: SMFCC) or Toasebio Parish located in District Glodok, Jakarta, Indonesia. The author exposes in advance the meaning of the physical elements of the building SMFCC as understood by history writers and building experts. These meanings are not inseparable from the elements of human activities in the building. Through qualitative methods and literature review, the author describes in the Results section, how (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  36
    A Confucian Slippery Slope Argument.Michael Harrington - 2017 - Confucian Academy: Chinese Thought and Culture Review 4 (1):89-101.
    The Song and Ming dynasty Confucians make frequent use of what would today be identified as a slippery slope argument. The Book of Changes and its early commentaries provide both the language and the rationale for this argument, inasmuch as the Confucians regard these texts as a method for identifying tiny problems that will one day threaten the state. While today the slippery slope argument is often criticized for promoting an unreasoned resistance to change, a close look at its use (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Computers, Persons, and the Chinese Room. Part 1: The Human Computer.Ricardo Restrepo - 2012 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 33 (1):27-48.
    Detractors of Searle’s Chinese Room Argument have arrived at a virtual consensus that the mental properties of the Man performing the computations stipulated by the argument are irrelevant to whether computational cognitive science is true. This paper challenges this virtual consensus to argue for the first of the two main theses of the persons reply, namely, that the mental properties of the Man are what matter. It does this by challenging many of the arguments and conceptions put forth by (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Di Er Ci Qimeng 第二次启蒙 (The Second Enlightenment) by Wang Zhihe 王治河 and Fan Meijun 樊美筠 (Review).Robin R. Wang - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):449-450.
    Di er ci Qimeng (The second Enlightenment), by Wang Zhihe and Fan Meijun, is a timely book in Chinese about constructing a philosophical and practical way to contend with China's postmodernization. It combines Whitehead's process philosophy with a focus on Chinese modernity in order to map out a desirable postmodern society. It addresses the problem on several dimensions from policy making to basic value systems. The range of themes can be seen from the topics of the book's twelve (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  91
    Narratives and Culture: The Role of Stories in Self-Creation.Arran Gare - 2002 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2002 (122):80-100.
    The condition of postmodernity has been associated with the depreciation of narratives. Here it is argued that stories play a primordial role in human self-creation, underpinning more abstract discourses such as mathematics, logic and science. This thesis is defended telling a story of the evolution of European culture from Ancient Greece to the present, including an account of the rise of the notion of culture and its relation to the development of history, thereby showing how stories function to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36. A Chinese Room That Understands.Herbert A. Simon & Stuart A. Eisenstadt - 2003 - In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  16
    A Long Way From Home: Automatic Culture in Domestic and Civic Life.Eugene Halton - 1992 - In Floyd W. Rudmin & Marsha Richins (eds.), Meaning, Measure, and Morality of Materialism. Provo, UT, USA: pp. 1-9.
    A Long Way From Home: Automatic Culture in Domestic and Civic Life criticizes tendencies toward automatism in American culture and modern life, and calls for a recentering of domestic and civic life as a means to revitalize social life. Keywords: Automatic Culture, Autonomy Versus Automatic, Moral Homelessness, Materialism, The Great American Centrifuge, Consuming Devices, Home Cooking, From the Walled City to the Malled City, Malls, Vaclav Havel.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Consciousness and Understanding in the Chinese Room.Simone Gozzano - 1995 - Informatica 19:653-56.
    In this paper I submit that the “Chinese room” argument rests on the assumption that understanding a sentence necessarily implies being conscious of its content. However, this assumption can be challenged by showing that two notions of consciousness come into play, one to be found in AI, the other in Searle’s argument, and that the former is an essential condition for the notion used by Searle. If Searle discards the first, he not only has trouble explaining how we can (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  46
    Culture Weaponized: A Contrarian Theory of the Sometime Appropriateness of the Destruction, Theft and Trade of Art and Cultural Artifacts in Armed Conflict.Duncan MacIntosh - manuscript
    This paper argues that culture itself can be a weapon against the disentitled within cultures, and against members of other cultures; and when cultures are unjust and hegemonic, the theft of and destruction of elements of their culture can be a justifiable weapon of self-defense by the oppressed. This means that in at least some conflicts, those that are really insurgencies against oppression, such theft and destruction should not be seen as war crimes, but as legitimate military maneuvers. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. On the Fundamental Worldview of the Integral Culture: Integrating Science, Religion, and Art: Part One.Attila Grandpierre - 2003 - World Futures 59 (6):463-483.
    In the present essay I suggest that the main reason why history failed to develop societies in harmony with Nature, including our internal nature as well, is that we failed to evaluate the exact basis of the factor ultimately governing our thoughts. We failed to realise that it is the worldview that ultimately governs our thoughts and through our thoughts, our actions. In this work I consider the ultimate foundations of philosophy, science, religion, and art, pointing out that they were (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Ontological Complexity and Human Culture.D. J. Saab & F. Fonseca - forthcoming - In R. Hagengruber (ed.), Proceedings of Philosophy's Relevance in Information Science.
    Ontologies are being used by information scientists in order to facilitate the sharing of meaningful information. However, computational ontologies are problematic in that they often decontextualize information. The semantic content of information is dependent upon the context in which it exists and the experience through which it emerges. For true semantic interoperability to occur among diverse information systems, within or across domains, information must remain contextualized. In order to bring more context to computational ontologies, we introduce culture as an (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Crime as the Limit of Culture.Sergio Tonkonoff - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (4):529-544.
    In this article culture is understood as the ensemble of systems of classification, assessment, and interaction that establishes a basic community of values in a given social field. We will argue that this is made possible through the institution of fundamental prohibitions understood as mythical points of closure that set the last frontiers of that community by designating what crime is. Exploring these theses, we will see that criminal transgression may be thought of as the actualization of a rigorous (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Reaching for My Gun: Why We Shouldn't Hear the Word "Culture" in Normative Political Theory.Simon Cushing - 2007 - 1st Global Conference: Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging.
    Culture is a notoriously elusive concept. This fact has done nothing to hinder its popularity in contemporary analytic political philosophy among writers like John Rawls, Will Kymlicka, Michael Walzer, David Miller, Iris Marion Young, Joseph Raz, Avishai Margalit and Bikhu Parekh, among many others. However, this should stop, both for the metaphysical reason that the concept of culture, like that of race, is itself either incoherent or lacking a referent in reality, and for several normative reasons. I focus (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Immigration, Interpersonal Trust and National Culture.Lubomira Radoilska - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):111-128.
    This article offers a critical analysis of David Miller’s proposal that liberal immigration policies should be conceptualized in terms of a quasi-contract between receiving nations and immigrant groups, designed to ensure both that cultural diversity does not undermine trust among citizens and that immigrants are treated fairly. This proposal fails to address sufficiently two related concerns. Firstly, an open-ended, quasi-contractual requirement for cultural integration leaves immigrant groups exposed to arbitrary critique as insufficiently integrated and unworthy of trust as citizens. Secondly, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang. [REVIEW]Paul Boshears - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):166 - 167.
    Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang Content Type Journal Article Pages 166-167 Authors Paul Boshears, Europäische Universität für Interdisziplinäre Studien/The European Graduate School Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  82
    How Pictorial is Chinese? And Does It Matter?Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2010 - Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 18:317-319.
    It has often been said that the Chinese script is pictorial or ideographic, and that this is one of the reasons why Chinese tend to think more analogically than logically, and why in the past the natural sciences developed to a lesser degree in China than in the West. These are strong claims. They have often been oversimplified and exaggerated, but I think there is something to be said for them. Here I will focus on the first question. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Computers, Persons, and the Chinese Room. Part 2: Testing Computational Cognitive Science.Ricardo Restrepo - 2012 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 33 (3):123-140.
    This paper is a follow-up of the first part of the persons reply to the Chinese Room Argument. The first part claims that the mental properties of the person appearing in that argument are what matter to whether computational cognitive science is true. This paper tries to discern what those mental properties are by applying a series of hypothetical psychological and strengthened Turing tests to the person, and argues that the results support the thesis that the Man performing the (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  36
    Gospel and Culture: Areas of Conflict, Consent, and Conversion.Domenic Marbaniang - 2014 - Journal of the Contemporary Christian 6 (1):07-17.
    Culture and Religion have fundamental differences. Culture is related to nature, while religion emphasizes on authority and revelation. Culture naturally is more dynamic, while culture religionised is stagnant and conservative.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Why Some Apes Became Humans, Competition, Consciousness, and Culture.Pouwel Slurink - 2002 - Dissertation, Radboud University
    Chapter 1 (To know in order to survive) & Chapter 2 (A critique of evolved reason) explain human knowledge and its limits from an evolutionary point of view. Chapter 3 (Captured in our Cockpits) explains the evolution of consciousness, using value driven decision theory. Chapter 4-6 (Chapter 4 Sociobiology, Chapter 5 Culture: het Human Arena), Chapter 6, Genes, Memes, and the Environment) show that to understand culture you have at least to deal with 4 levels: genes, brains, the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  96
    Explaining Culture.Morton Adam - 1997 - Philosophical Books 38 (4):235-239.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000