View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

271 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 271
Material to categorize
  1. Women Proficiency in Global Crises Management: The Case of Ethiopia.Debela Bedada - 2020 - International Journal of Scientific Research and Management (IJSRM) 8 (4).
    The COVID-19 virus is a new pathogen that is highly contagious, can spread quickly, considered capable of causing enormous health, economic and societal impacts. According to the WHO report, about (78%-85%) human-to-human transmission of the COVID-19 virus is the household transmission that has occurred in families where women's conventional role is very crucial. The main purpose of this paper is to assess women's proficiency in addressing the Covid-19 pandemic in Ethiopia. The finding suggests that women's leadership is more likely than (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The COVID-19 Containment in Vietnam: What Are We Doing?Toan Luu Duc Huynh - 2020 - Journal of Global Health 10 (1):010338.
    This viewpoint provides an explanation from the public health policies of Vietnamese government to contain the contagious disease with regard to COVID-19 pandemic. A combination of an early lockdown, increase in “virality” of the health information, encouragement in health declaration, regulation for wearing mask in the public, and country’s unity have been the effective ways to cope with this deadly virus in Vietnam, a developing country, which became the first country to halt the SARS spread successfully in 2003.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Policy Response, Social Media and Science Journalism for the Sustainability of the Public Health System Amid the COVID-19 Outbreak: The Vietnam Lessons.La Viet Phuong, Pham Thanh Hang, Manh-Toan Ho, Nguyen Minh Hoang, Nguyen Phuc Khanh Linh, Vuong Thu Trang, Nguyen To Hong Kong, Tran Trung, Khuc Van Quy, Ho Manh Tung & Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2020 - Sustainability 12:2931.
    Vietnam, with a geographical proximity and a high volume of trade with China, was the first country to record an outbreak of the new Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 or SARS-CoV-2. While the country was expected to have a high risk of transmission, as of April 4, 2020—in comparison to attempts to contain the disease around the world—responses from Vietnam are being seen as prompt and effective in protecting the interests of its citizens, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4. We Need to Relax Intellectual Property Rules to Fight This Virus.James Cooper - 2020 - The Hill 1 (1):1.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Is Preventive Detention Morally Worse Than Quarantine?Thomas Douglas - 2019 - In Jan W. De Keijser, Julian Roberts & Jesper Ryberg (eds.), Predictive Sentencing: Normative and Empirical Perspectives. London: Hart Publishing.
    In some jurisdictions, the institutions of criminal justice may subject individuals who have committed crimes to preventive detention. By this, I mean detention of criminal offenders (i) who have already been punished to (or beyond) the point that no further punishment can be justified on general deterrent, retributive, restitutory, communicative or other backwardlooking grounds, (ii) for preventive purposes—that is, for the purposes of preventing the detained individual from engaging in further criminal or otherwise socially costly conduct. Preventive detention, thus understood, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Impartiality and Infectious Disease: Prioritizing Individuals Versus the Collective in Antibiotic Prescription.Bernadine Dao, Thomas Douglas, Alberto Giubilini, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Nadira S. Faber - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):63-69.
    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global public health disaster driven largely by antibiotic use in human health care. Doctors considering whether to prescribe antibiotics face an ethical conflict between upholding individual patient health and advancing public health aims. Existing literature mainly examines whether patients awaiting consultations desire or expect to receive antibiotic prescriptions, but does not report views of the wider public regarding conditions under which doctors should prescribe antibiotics. It also does not explore the ethical significance of public views (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Protective Microbiota: From Localized to Long-Reaching Co-Immunity.Lynn Chiu, Thomas Bazin, Marie-Elise Truchetet, Thierry Schaeverbeke, Laurence Delhaes & Thomas Pradeu - 2017 - Frontiers Immunology 8:1678.
    Resident microbiota do not just shape host immunity, they can also contribute to host protection against pathogens and infectious diseases. Previous reviews of the protective roles of the microbiota have focused exclusively on colonization resistance localized within a microenvironment. This review shows that the protection against pathogens also involves the mitigation of pathogenic impact without eliminating the pathogens (i.e., “disease tolerance”) and the containment of microorganisms to prevent pathogenic spread. Protective microorganisms can have an impact beyond their niche, interfering with (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Malaria Diagnosis and the Plasmodium Life Cycle: The BFO Perspective.Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2010 - In Interdisciplinary Ontology. Proceedings of the Third Interdisciplinary Ontology Meeting. Tokyo: Keio University Press. pp. 25-34.
    Definitive diagnosis of malaria requires the demonstration through laboratory tests of the presence within the patient of malaria parasites or their components. Since malaria parasites can be present even in the absence of malaria manifestations, and since symptoms of malaria can be manifested even in the absence of malaria parasites, malaria diagnosis raises important issues for the adequate understanding of disease, etiology and diagnosis. One approach to the resolution of these issues adopts a realist view, according to which the needed (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Ontological Representation of CDC Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Case Reports.Albert Goldfain, Barry Smith & Lindsay G. Cowell - 2014 - Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Biomedical Ontology 1327:74-77.
    The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Active Bacterial Core Surveillance (CDC ABCs) Program is a collaborative effort betweeen the CDC, state health departments, laboratories, and universities to track invasive bacterial pathogens of particular importance to public health [1]. The year-end surveillance reports produced by this program help to shape public policy and coordinate responses to emerging infectious diseases over time. The ABCs case report form (CRF) data represents an excellent opportunity for data reuse beyond the original surveillance purposes.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. A Plant Disease Extension of the Infectious Disease Ontology.Ramona Walls, Barry Smith, Elser Justin, Goldfain Albert & W. Stevenson Dennis - 2012 - In Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (CEUR 897). pp. 1-5.
    Plants from a handful of species provide the primary source of food for all people, yet this source is vulnerable to multiple stressors, such as disease, drought, and nutrient deficiency. With rapid population growth and climate uncertainty, the need to produce crops that can tolerate or resist plant stressors is more crucial than ever. Traditional plant breeding methods may not be sufficient to overcome this challenge, and methods such as highOthroughput sequencing and automated scoring of phenotypes can provide significant new (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Justifications for Non-­Consensual Medical Intervention: From Infectious Disease Control to Criminal Rehabilitation.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2016 - Criminal Justice Ethics 35 (3):205-229.
    A central tenet of medical ethics holds that it is permissible to perform a medical intervention on a competent individual only if that individual has given informed consent to the intervention. However, in some circumstances it is tempting to say that the moral reason to obtain informed consent prior to administering a medical intervention is outweighed. For example, if an individual’s refusal to undergo a medical intervention would lead to the transmission of a dangerous infectious disease to other members of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12. Infectious Disease Ontology.Lindsay Grey Cowell & Barry Smith - 2009 - In Infectious Disease Informatics. New York: Springer New York. pp. 373-395.
    Technological developments have resulted in tremendous increases in the volume and diversity of the data and information that must be processed in the course of biomedical and clinical research and practice. Researchers are at the same time under ever greater pressure to share data and to take steps to ensure that data resources are interoperable. The use of ontologies to annotate data has proven successful in supporting these goals and in providing new possibilities for the automated processing of data and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  13. Neurological Menifastations in Leprosy. A Study Among Tribal Community in Bangladesh.Tanjimul Islam & Shamrin Sultana - 2016 - Journal of Enam Medical College 6 (1):10-14.
    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease having major burden on humans over thousands of years. If untreated, it results in permanent damage to various systems and organs. So we designed this study to evaluate the neurological complications in early stage in adult leprosy patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of neurological manifestations among adult leprosy patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional hospital-based study on 85 adult tribal leprosy patients was conducted in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Neurological Manifestations in Leprosy: A Study in Tribal! Community of Hill Tracts.Tanjimul Islam - 2016 - Journal of Enam Medical College 6 (1):10-14.
    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease having major burden on humans over thousands of years. If untreated, it results in permanent damage to various systems and organs. So we designed this study to evaluate the neurological complications in early stage in adult leprosy patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of neurological manifestations among adult leprosy patients. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional hospital-based study on 85 adult tribal leprosy patients was conducted in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Zika Virus: Can Artificial Contraception Be Condoned?Marvin J. H. Lee, Ravi S. Edara, Peter A. Clark & Andrew T. Myers - 2016 - Internet Journal of Infectious Diseases 15 (1).
    As the Zika virus pandemic continues to bring worry and fear to health officials and medical scientists, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) have recommended that residents of the Zika-infected countries, e.g., Brazil, and those who have traveled to the area should delay having babies which may involve artificial contraceptive, particularly condom. This preventive policy, however, is seemingly at odds with the Roman Catholic Church’s position on the contraceptive. As least since the promulgation of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Dispositions and the Infectious Disease Ontology.Albert Goldfain, Barry Smith & Lindsay Cowell - 2010 - In Formal Ontology in Information Systems: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference (FOIS). IOS Press. pp. 400-413.
    This paper addresses the use of dispositions in the Infectious Disease Ontology (IDO). IDO is an ontology constructed according to the principles of the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) Foundry and uses the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) as an upper ontology. After providing a brief introduction to disposition types in BFO and IDO, we discuss three general techniques for representing combinations of dispositions under the headings blocking dispositions, complementary dispositions, and collective dispositions. Motivating examples for each combination of dispositions is given (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
COVID-19
  1. Altruistic Vaccination: Insights From Two Focus Group Studies.Steven R. Kraaijeveld & Bob C. Mulder - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-21.
    Vaccination can protect vaccinated individuals and often also prevent them from spreading disease to other people. This opens up the possibility of getting vaccinated for the sake of others. In fact, altruistic vaccination has recently been conceptualized as a kind of vaccination that is undertaken primary for the benefit of others. In order to better understand the potential role of altruistic motives in people’s vaccination decisions, we conducted two focus group studies with a total of 37 participants. Study 1 included (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. COVID-19: A Dystopian Delusion: Examining the Machinations of Governments, Health Organizations, the Globalist Elites, Big Pharma, Big Tech, and the Legacy Media.Scott D. G. Ventureyra (ed.) - 2022 - Ottawa, ON, Canada: True Freedom Press.
    Since March of 2020, the world has been brought to its knees by unscientific and unethical mandates. These mandates have destroyed the world economy and the lives of countless innocent individuals. The “cure” that has been offered by medical bureaucrats and politicians has been more deadly than the disease (COVID-19). The imposition of ludicrous lockdowns, mask-wearing, coerced vaccination, and vaccine passports have not only proved to be ineffective, but also much more harmful than SARS-CoV-2 and all its variants. COVID-19 has (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Would a 'Vaccine Passport' Work in the Philippines?Joefer Maninang - 2021 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (31):341-347.
    A novel coronavirus in 2019 took the life of ‘patient zero’ and then millions of others alerting nation states to protect and secure the lives of their citizens. The coronavirus known as SARS-CoV-2 caused the ‘COVID-19’ disease which had governments impose restrictions on the freedom of movement or the right to travel in the form of ‘community quarantines.’ The serious adverse effects of these on the world and national economies moved the governments to loosen the quarantines and implement versions of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC). A New Collaborative Global Platform for Global Clinical Trials Targeting Post-COVID19 Patients.Maria Izabel Cavalcante Siqueira - 2022 - Manual Therapy, Posturology and Rehabilitation Journal 20:1-6.
    Background: In response to the pandemic caused by COVID-19, World Health Organization (WHO), together with International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC), developed research protocols facilitating global collaboration and accelerating the understanding of the disease, to identify the potential symptoms and persistent sequelae in infected individuals, which can be used in different areas of health, that is, in primary care, at a hospital or outpatient level, both public and private. Objective: To describe the International Severe Acute Respiratory and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A Comprehensive Update on CIDO: The Community-Based Coronavirus Infectious Disease Ontology.Yongqun He, Hong Yu, Anthony Huffman, Asiyah Yu Lin, Darren A. Natale, John Beverley, Ling Zheng, Yehoshua Perl, Zhigang Wang, Yingtong Liu, Edison Ong, Yang Wang, Philip Huang, Long Tran, Jinyang Du, Zalan Shah, Easheta Shah, Roshan Desai, Hsin-hui Huang, Yujia Tian, Eric Merrell, William D. Duncan, Sivaram Arabandi, Lynn M. Schriml, Jie Zheng, Anna Maria Masci, Liwei Wang, Hongfang Liu, Fatima Zohra Smaili, Robert Hoehndorf, Zoë May Pendlington, Paola Roncaglia, Xianwei Ye, Jiangan Xie, Yi-Wei Tang, Xiaolin Yang, Suyuan Peng, Luxia Zhang, Luonan Chen, Junguk Hur, Gilbert S. Omenn, Brian Athey & Barry Smith - 2022 - Journal of Biomedical Semantics 13 (1):25.
    The current COVID-19 pandemic and the previous SARS/MERS outbreaks of 2003 and 2012 have resulted in a series of major global public health crises. We argue that in the interest of developing effective and safe vaccines and drugs and to better understand coronaviruses and associated disease mechenisms it is necessary to integrate the large and exponentially growing body of heterogeneous coronavirus data. Ontologies play an important role in standard-based knowledge and data representation, integration, sharing, and analysis. Accordingly, we initiated the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Scientific Disagreements, Fast Science and Higher-Order Evidence.Daniel Friedman & Dunja Šešelja - 2022
    Scientific disagreements are an important catalyst for scientific progress. But what happens when scientists disagree amidst times of crisis, when we need quick yet reliable policy guidance? In this paper we aim to provide a normative account for how scientists facing disagreement in the context of ‘fast science’ should respond, and how policy makers should evaluate such disagreement. Starting from an argumentative, pragma-dialectic account of scientific controversies (Donato Rodríguez and Zamora Bonilla, 2013), we argue for the importance of ‘higher-order evidence (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Editorial: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): Socio-Economic Systems in the Post-Pandemic World: Design Thinking, Strategic Planning, Management, and Public Policy.Andrzej Klimczuk, Eva Berde, Delali Dovie, Magdalena Klimczuk-Kochańska & Gabriella Spinelli - 2022 - Frontiers in Communication 7:1–5.
    The declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020, led to unprecedented events. All regions of the world participated in implementing preventive health measures such as physical distancing, travel restrictions, self-isolation, quarantines, and facility closures. The pandemic started global disruption of socio-economic systems, covering the postponement or cancellation of public events, supply shortages, schools and universities’ closure, evacuation of foreign citizens, a rise in unemployment and inflation, misinformation, the anti-vaccine movement, and incidents of discrimination (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. 16 The Logic of Lockdowns: A Game of Modeling and Evidence.Wesley J. Park - 2022 - BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine 27 (Suppl 1):A59.
    Lockdowns, or modern quarantines, involve the use of novel restrictive non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to suppress the transmission of COVID-19. In this paper, I aim to critically analyze the emerging history and philosophy of lockdowns, with an emphasis on the communication of health evidence and risk for informing policy decisions. I draw a distinction between evidence-based and modeling-based decision-making. I argue that using the normative framework of evidence-based medicine would have recommended against the use of lockdowns. I first review the World (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. COVID-19 and the Unseen Pandemic of Child Abuse.Wesley J. Park & Kristen A. Walsh - 2022 - BMJ Paediatrics Open 6 (1).
    For children, the collateral damage of the COVID-19 pandemic response has been considerable. In this paper, we use the framework of evidence-based medicine to argue that child abuse is another negative side effect of COVID-19 lockdowns. While it was certain that school closures would have profound social and economic costs, it remains uncertain whether they have any effect on COVID-19 transmission. There is emerging evidence that lockdowns significantly worsened child abuse on a global scale. Low-income and middle-income countries are particularly (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Supererogatory Duties and Caregiver Heroic Testimony.Chris Weigel - forthcoming - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly.
    Nurses in hard hit cities during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic and family caregivers for people with late-stage Alzheimer’s disease present two puzzles. First, traditional accounts of supererogation cannot allow for the possibility of making enormous sacrifices that make one’s actions supererogatory simply to do what morality requires. These caregivers, however, are doing their moral duty, yet their actions also seem to be paradigmatic cases of supererogation. I argue that Dale Dorsey’s new account of supererogation can solve this (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Responding to the Call Through Translating Science Into ImPact: Building an Evidence-Based Approaches to Effectively Curb Public Health Emergencies [Covid-19 Crisis]. [REVIEW]Morufu Olalekan Raimi, Kalada Godson Mcfubara, Oyeyemi Sunday Abisoye, Clinton Ifeanyichukwu Ezekwe, Olawale Henry Sawyerr & Gift Aziba-Anyam Raimi - 2021 - Global Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease 1:12-45.
    COVID-19 demonstrated a global catastrophe that touched everybody, including the scientific community. As we respond and recover rapidly from this pandemic, there is an opportunity to guarantee that the fabric of our society includes sustainability, fairness, and care. However, approaches to environmental health attempt to decrease the population burden of COVID-19, toward saving patients from becoming ill along with preserving the allocation of clinical resources and public safety standards. This paper explores environmental and public health evidence-based practices toward responding to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Making Better Informed, More Confident COVID-19 Decisions: Vaccine Hesitancy, Its Barriers and Impact Studies: Taking Bayelsa State as an Example.Morufu Olalekan Raimi, Emeka Chisom Lucky, Ebikapaye Okoyen, Angalabiri Clement, Christopher Ogbointuwei & Atoyebi Babatunde - 2021 - International Journal of Vaccines and Immunization 5 (1):1-13.
    Background: Health care practitioners are recognized to have a large influence in shaping uptake of vaccine in new borns, children, adolescents, as well as adults. Parents remain more secure in their decisions when health care practitioners communicate successfully with them about vaccine dangers and benefits, the value as well as necessity for vaccinations, as well as vaccine safety. Thus, immunization remain the foundation of the primary health care system, an indisputable human right as well as a global health and development (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Alternative Protection of Intellectual Property Rights in Vaccine Production and Use Under Covid-19.Ling Jin - 2022 - Journal of Education, Humanities and Social Sciences 1 (1):147-153.
    For the past three years, Coronavirus-19 (Covid-19) has become one of the major global health problems. Unlike any previous virus in the past decades, Covid-19 has shown its unprecedented spreading speed, infection rate, fatality rate, etc. Under this urgent disease outbursting event, scientists around the globe, through the myriad of research and experiments, successfully developed effective vaccines. However, like many other medical innovations, Covid-19 vaccines are categorized as intellectual properties and a scarce resource. As a consequence, the citizens of developed (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Systemising Triage: COVID-19 Guidelines and Their Underlying Theories of Distributive Justice.Lukas J. Meier - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (4):703-714.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has been overwhelming public health-care systems around the world. With demand exceeding the availability of medical resources in several regions, hospitals have been forced to invoke triage. To ensure that this difficult task proceeds in a fair and organised manner, governments scrambled experts to draft triage guidelines under enormous time pressure. Although there are similarities between the documents, they vary considerably in how much weight their respective authors place on the different criteria that they propose. Since most (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Lived Experiences of Extension Project Implementers Amidst COVID-19 Pandemic: The Unspoken Frontliners.Aylene D. Pizaña, Raniel Erwin C. Pizaña, Angeline M. Pogoy & Jupeth T. Pentang - 2021 - European Scholar Journal 2 (4):431-436.
    Extension project implementers ensure that activities and community linkages are not hampered by the challenges posed by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study presents the lived experiences of extension project implementers in providing community services in the midst of pandemic. Specifically, their experiences, reflections, and insights in the implementation of extension projects were enumerated. Eleven extensionists who were directly involved in and capable of conducting University extension projects were purposefully chosen as participants. Descriptive phenomenology research design was employed. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Relaxing Mask Mandates in New Jersey: A Tale of Two Universities.Wesley J. Park - 2022 - Voices in Bioethics 8.
    The ethical question is whether university mask mandates should be relaxed. I argue that the use of face masks by healthy individuals has uncertain benefits, which potential harms may outweigh, and should therefore be voluntary. Systematic reviews by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections concluded that the use of face masks by healthy individuals in the community lacks effectiveness in reducing viral transmission based on moderate-quality evidence. The only two randomized controlled trials of face masks published (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Against COVID‐19 Vaccination of Healthy Children.Steven R. Kraaijeveld, Rachel Gur-Arie & Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):687-698.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 6, Page 687-698, July 2022.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Pandemic Ethics and Status Quo Risk.Richard Yetter Chappell - 2022 - Public Health Ethics 15 (1):64-73.
    Conservative assumptions in medical ethics risk immense harms during a pandemic. Public health institutions and public discourse alike have repeatedly privileged inaction over aggressive medical interventions to address the pandemic, perversely increasing population-wide risks while claiming to be guided by ‘caution’. This puzzling disconnect between rhetoric and reality is suggestive of an underlying philosophical confusion. In this paper, I argue that we have been misled by status quo bias—exaggerating the moral significance of the risks inherent in medical interventions, while systematically (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. A DEEP LEARNING APPROACH FOR LSTM BASED COVID-19 FORECASTING SYSTEM.K. Jothimani - 2022 - Journal of Science Technology and Research (JSTAR) 3 (1):28-38.
    : COVID-19 has proliferated over the earth, exposing mankind at risk. The assets of the world's most powerful economies are at stake due to the disease's high infectivity and contagiousness. The capacity of machine learning algorithms can estimate the amount of future COVID-19 cases, which is now considered a possible threat to civilization. Five conventional measuring models, notably LR, LASSO, SVM, ES, and LSTM, were utilised in this work to examine COVID-19's undermining variables. Each model contains three sorts of expectations: (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. THE IMPROVED MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR CONTINUOUS FORECASTING OF THE EPIDEMIC.V. R. Manuraj - 2022 - Journal of Science Technology and Research (JSTAR) 3 (1):55-64.
    COVID-19 began in China in December 2019. As of January 2021, over a hundred million instances had been reported worldwide, leaving a deep socio-economic impact globally. Current investigation studies determined that artificial intelligence (AI) can play a key role in reducing the effect of the virus spread. The prediction of COVID-19 incidence in different countries and territories is important because it serves as a guide for governments, healthcare providers, and the general public in developing management strategies to battle the disease. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. A Hole That Does Not Speak: Covid, Catastrophe and the Impossible.Jack Black - 2022 - Philosophy World Democracy (xx):1-13.
    Covid-19 presents itself as a strange catastrophe. It has neither destroyed the planet nor has it erased humanity… but it has, in many ways, served to upend and alter what was previously considered ‘normal.’ As a result, what is perhaps the most notable characteristic of the Covid catastrophe is the very way it endures. Beyond any notion of catastrophic shock, the Covid catastrophe continues, indeed, it lingers in daily news cycles, changes to working environments and restrictions on travel. It is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. COVID-19 Vaccination and the Right to Take Risks.Pei-hua Huang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics (8):534-537.
    The rare but severe cerebral venous thrombosis occurring in some AstraZeneca vaccine recipients has prompted some governments to suspend part of their COVID-19 vaccination programmes. Such suspensions have faced various challenges from both scientific and ethical angles. Most of the criticisms against such suspensions follow a consequentialist approach, arguing that the suspension will lead to more harm than benefits. In this paper, I propose a rights-based argument against the suspension of the vaccine rollouts amid this highly time-sensitive combat of COVID-19. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. COVID-19 Vaccine Refusal and Fair Allocation of Scarce Medical Resources.Govind Persad & Emily A. Largent - 2022 - JAMA Health Forum 3 (4):e220356.
    When hospitals face surges of patients with COVID-19, fair allocation of scarce medical resources remains a challenge. Scarcity has at times encompassed not only hospital and intensive care unit beds—often reflecting staffing shortages—but also therapies and intensive treatments. Safe, highly effective COVID-19 vaccines have been free and widely available since mid-2021, yet many Americans remain unvaccinated by choice. Should their decision to forgo vaccination be considered when allocating scarce resources? Some have suggested it should, while others disagree. We offer a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Biopolitics and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Foucauldian Interpretation of the Danish Government’s Response to the Pandemic.Philip Højme - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (2):34.
    With the coronavirus pandemic and the Omicron variant once again forcing countries into lockdown, this essay seeks to outline a Foucauldian critique of various legal measures taken by the Danish government to cope with COVID-19 during the first year and a half of the pandemic. The essay takes a critical look at the extra-legal measures employed by the Danish government, as the Danish politicians attempted to halt the spread of the, now almost forgotten, Cluster 5 COVID-19 variant. This situation will (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Trolleys, Triage and Covid-19: The Role of Psychological Realism in Sacrificial Dilemmas.Markus Kneer & Ivar R. Hannikainen - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (1):137-153.
    At the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, frontline medical professionals at intensive care units around the world faced gruesome decisions about how to ration life-saving medical resources. These events provided a unique lens through which to understand how the public reasons about real-world dilemmas involving trade-offs between human lives. In three studies (total N = 2298), we examined people’s moral attitudes toward the triage of acute coronavirus patients, and found elevated support for utilitarian triage policies. These utilitarian tendencies did not (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26. Covid-19 Second Wave: Challenges for Education and Disaster Management.V. P. Singh & Prabhakar Singh - 2021 - In Verma And Others (ed.), COVID-19 SECOND WAVE: CHALLENGES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Prayagraj: ABRF. pp. 130-132.
    Coronavirus disease (Covid-19) is an infectious disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Spreading rate of mutated corona virus (delta variant) during second wave was very fast. Most of the people infected with the COVID-19 virus experienced mild to moderate to severe respiratory illness. Although patients in the second wave were younger but the duration of hospitalization and case fatality rate were lower than those in the first wave. During first wave of Covid-19 it was observed that persons above 55 years (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Covid-19 Pandemic: Challenges for Education and Environment.Mukul Sinha & S. K. Srivastava - 2021 - In Verma And Others (ed.), COVID-19 SECOND WAVE: CHALLENGES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Prayagraj: ABRF. pp. 126-129.
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease that causes respiratory illness in human and has now become a major challenge for all over the world. In spite of all their efforts to restore the nature during the last few decades, humans could only move a few steps forward. But during the last few months, consequences of the COVID-19 Pandemic have successfully recovered the environment to a large extent that should definitely set positive impact on global climate change. The COVID-19 (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. COVID-19 Pandemic: New Challenges for Environmental Sustainability in Developing Countries.Prakash Sadguru & Ashok K. Verma - 2021 - In COVID-19 SECOND WAVE: CHALLENGES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Prayagraj: pp. 102-105.
    Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), produced by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic, giving rise to a serious health threat globally. The global Covid-19 pandemic is a setback for sustainable development and compromise the world commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The measures taken to control the spread of the virus and the slowdown of economic activities during lockdown have significant effects on the environment. Therefore, this review discuss the indirect positive and negative (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. COVID-19 Pandemic: New Challenges for Environmental Sustainability in Developing Countries.Sadguru Prakash & Ashok K. Verma - 2021 - In Verma (ed.), COVID-19 SECOND WAVE: CHALLENGES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Prayagraj: ABRF. pp. 102-105.
    Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), produced by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic, giving rise to a serious health threat globally. The global Covid-19 pandemic is a setback for sustainable development and compromise the world commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The measures taken to control the spread of the virus and the slowdown of economic activities during lockdown have significant effects on the environment. Therefore, this review discuss the indirect positive and negative (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Should Pediatric Patients Be Prioritized When Rationing Life-Saving Treatments During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White, Cathy Zhang, Aaron Glickman, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & John Lantos - 2020 - Pediatrics 146 (3):e2020012542.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Conceptual Metaphors in North African French-Speaking News Discourse About COVID-19.Hicham Lahlou & Hajar Abdul Rahim - 2022 - Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics 11 (3):589-600.
    Conceptual metaphors have received much attention in research on discourse about infectious diseases in recent years. Most studies found that conceptual metaphors of war dominate media discourse about disease. Similarly, a great deal of research has been undertaken on the new coronavirus, i.e., COVID-19, especially in the English news discourse as opposed to other languages. The present study, in contrast, analyses the conceptual metaphors used in COVID-19 discourse in French-language newspapers. The study explored the linguistic metaphors used in COVID-19 discourse (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Categorized Priority Systems: A New Tool for Fairly Allocating Scarce Medical Resources in the Face of Profound Social Inequities.Tayfun Sönmez, Parag A. Pathak, M. Utku Ünver, Govind Persad, Robert D. Truog & Douglas B. White - 2021 - Chest 153 (3):1294-1299.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has motivated medical ethicists and several task forces to revisit or issue new guidelines on allocating scarce medical resources. Such guidelines are relevant for the allocation of scarce therapeutics and vaccines and for allocation of ICU beds, ventilators, and other life-sustaining treatments or potentially scarce interventions. Principles underlying these guidelines, like saving the most lives, mitigating disparities, reciprocity to those who assume additional risk (eg, essential workers and clinical trial participants), and equal access may (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33. Fair Allocation of Scarce Therapies for COVID-19.Govind Persad, Monica E. Peek & Seema K. Shah - 2021 - Clinical Infectious Diseases 18:ciab1039.
    The U.S. FDA has issued emergency use authorizations for monoclonal antibodies for non-hospitalized patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 disease and for individuals exposed to COVID-19 as post-exposure prophylaxis. One EUA for an oral antiviral drug, molnupiravir, has also been recommended by FDA’s Antimicrobial Drugs Advisory Committee, and others appear likely in the near future. Due to increased demand because of the Delta variant, the federal government resumed control over the supply and asked states to ration doses. As future variants (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters for All Adults: An Optimal U.S. Approach?Ameet Sarpatwari, Ankur Pandya, Emily P. Hyle & Govind Persad - 2022 - Annals of Internal Medicine 175 (2):280–282.
    By 20 October 2021, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had amended its Emergency Use Authorizations for immunocompetent adults who previously received the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. For the 2-dose Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, the FDA permitted a single booster dose for adults aged 65 years or older and adults aged 18 to 64 years at high-risk for severe COVID-19 or at high risk for occupational or institutional COVID-19 exposure. For the single-dose Johnson & Johnson (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 271