Results for 'Ethics of Transplants'

999 found
Order:
  1. Richards, J. R., The Ethics of Transplants[REVIEW]Tomas Hribek - 2014 - Filosoficky Casopis 62:915-919.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Concerning the Ethics of Justice, Care, and Personal Responsibility as a Framework for Criteria Selection in Transplant Recipients.La Shun L. Carroll - 2023 - Integral Review 18 (1).
    Organ transplantation centers set criteria for candidate qualification, which has led to disparate healthcare resource allocation practices affecting those with a substance use history. These individuals are denied organ transplants by committees and healthcare providers who assign them lower priority status. The lower priority argument claims that healthcare resources should not be provided equally to individuals who fail to share responsibility for not doing enough to address the diseases associated with substance use. The purpose of this paper is to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Concerning the Ethics of Justice, Care, and Personal Responsibility as a Framework for Criteria Selection in Transplant Recipients.La Shun L. Carroll - 2023 - Integral Review 18 (1).
    Organ transplantation centers set criteria for candidate qualification, which has led to disparate healthcare resource allocation practices affecting those with a substance use history. These individuals are denied organ transplants by committees and healthcare providers who assign them lower priority status. The lower priority argument claims that healthcare resources should not be provided equally to individuals who fail to share responsibility for not doing enough to address the diseases associated with substance use. The purpose of this paper is to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Purloined organs: psychoanalysis of transplant organs as objects of desire.Hub Zwart - 2019 - New York City, New York, Verenigde Staten: Palgrave.
    Bioethical discourse on organ donation and transplantation medicine covers a wide range of topics, from informed consent procedures and scarcity issues up to transplant tourism and organ trade. Over the past decades, this discourse evolved into a stream of documents of bewildering proportions, encompassing thousands of books, papers, conferences, blogs, consensus meetings, policy reports, media debates and other outlets. Beneath the manifest level of discourse, however, a more latent dimension can be discerned, revolving around issues of embodiment, the moral status (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. Transplanting the Body: Preliminary Ethical Considerations.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2017 - The New Bioethics 23 (3):219-235.
    A dissociated area of medical research warrants bioethical consideration: a proposed transplantation of a donor’s entire body, except head, to a patient with a fatal degenerative disease. The seeming improbability of such an operation can only underscore the need for thorough bioethical assessment: Not assessing a case of such potential ethical import, by showing neglect instead of facing the issue, can only compound the ethical predicament, perhaps eroding public trust in ethical medicine. This article discusses the historical background of full-body (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Ethics of live uterus donor compensation.Ji-Young Lee - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (6):591-599.
    In this paper, I claim that live uterus donors ought to be considered for the possibility of compensation. I support my claim on the basis of comparable arguments which have already been applied to gamete donation, surrogacy, and other kinds of organ donation. However, I acknowledge that there are specificities associated with uterus donation, which make the issue of incentive and reward a harder ethical case relative to gamete donation, surrogacy, and other kinds of organ donation. Ultimately, I contend that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof.Julian Koplin & Michael Selgelid - 2019 - Journal of Practical Ethics 7 (3):32-53.
    Janet Radcliffe Richards’ The Ethics of Transplants outlines a novel framework for moral inquiry in practical contexts and applies it to the topic of paid living kidney donation. In doing so, Radcliffe Richards makes two key claims: that opponents of organ markets bear the burden of proof, and that this burden has not yet been satisfied. This paper raises four related objections to Radcliffe Richards’ methodological framework, focusing largely on how Radcliffe Richards uses this framework in her discussion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Will more organs save more lives? Cost‐effectiveness and the ethics of expanding organ procurement.Govind Persad - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):684-690.
    The assumption that procuring more organs will save more lives has inspired increasingly forceful calls to increase organ procurement. This project, in contrast, directly questions the premise that more organ transplantation means more lives saved. Its argument begins with the fact that resources are limited and medical procedures have opportunity costs. Because many other lifesaving interventions are more cost‐effective than transplantation and compete with transplantation for a limited budget, spending on organ transplantation consumes resources that could have been used to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Cutting to the Core: Exploring the Ethics of Contested Surgeries.Michael Benatar, Leslie Cannold, Dena Davis, Merle Spriggs, Julian Savulescu, Heather Draper, Neil Evans, Richard Hull, Stephen Wilkinson, David Wasserman, Donna Dickenson, Guy Widdershoven, Françoise Baylis, Stephen Coleman, Rosemarie Tong, Hilde Lindemann, David Neil & Alex John London - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    When the benefits of surgery do not outweigh the harms or where they do not clearly do so, surgical interventions become morally contested. Cutting to the Core examines a number of such surgeries, including infant male circumcision and cutting the genitals of female children, the separation of conjoined twins, surgical sex assignment of intersex children and the surgical re-assignment of transsexuals, limb and face transplantation, cosmetic surgery, and placebo surgery.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Review of When Death Becomes Life: Notes from a Transplant Surgeon. [REVIEW]Adam Omelianchuk - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):8-12.
    Joshua Mezrich is a practicing transplant surgeon who draws on his experiences, and those of his patients, to provide a "here's where we're at" moment in the story of transplant medicine. In so doing, he explains what it is like to practice while telling the stories of his patients, donors, and the pioneering surgeons who persisted in the face of failure to make what Mezrich does a work of healing. Written for a popular audience, When Death Becomes Life is perhaps (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Ethical issues of using umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy of John Stuart Mill perspective.Pattamawadee Sankheangaew - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy 1.
    This academic paper on Ethical issues of using umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy of John Stuart Mill perspective aim to investigate the new approaches in the treatment of diseases by using umbilical cord blood stem cells. And also to study ethical issues from the use of umbilical cord blood stem cells in the treatment of diseases considered by Mill’s utilitarianism. 21st century, the medical industry was interested in organ transplantation from stem cells especially stem cells from the umbilical cord (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Xenotransplantation: A historical–ethical account of viewpoints.Daniel Rodger, Daniel J. Hurst & David K. C. Cooper - forthcoming - Xenotransplantation.
    Formal clinical trials of pig-to-human organ transplant—known as xenotransplantation—may begin this decade, with the first trials likely to consist of either adult renal transplants or pediatric cardiac transplant patients. Xenotransplantation as a systematic scientific study only reaches back to the latter half of the 20th century, with episodic xenotransplantation events occurring prior to that. As the science of xenotransplantation has progressed in the 20th and 21st centuries, the public's knowledge of the potential therapy has also increased. With this, there (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Why and How to Compensate Living Organ Donors: Ethical Implications of the New Australian Scheme.Alberto Giubilini - 2014 - Bioethics 29 (4):283-290.
    The Australian Federal Government has announced a two-year trial scheme to compensate living organ donors. The compensation will be the equivalent of six weeks paid leave at the rate of the national minimum wage. In this article I analyse the ethics of compensating living organ donors taking the Australian scheme as a reference point. Considering the long waiting lists for organ transplantations and the related costs on the healthcare system of treating patients waiting for an organ, the 1.3 million (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Would it be ethical to use motivational interviewing to increase family consent to deceased solid organ donation?Isra Black & Lisa Forsberg - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):63-68.
    We explore the ethics of using motivational interviewing, an evidence-based, client-centred and directional counselling method, in conversations with next of kin about deceased solid organ donation. After briefly introducing MI and providing some context around organ transplantation and next of kin consent, we describe how MI might be implemented in this setting, with the hypothesis that MI has the potential to bring about a modest yet significant increase in next of kin consent rates. We subsequently consider the objection that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. Existing Ethical Tensions in Xenotransplantation.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):355-367.
    The genetic modification of pigs as a source of transplantable organs is one of several possible solutions to the chronic organ shortage. This paper describes existing ethical tensions in xenotransplantation (XTx) that argue against pursuing it. Recommendations for lifelong infectious disease surveillance and notification of close contacts of recipients are in tension with the rights of human research subjects. Parental/guardian consent for pediatric xenograft recipients is in tension with a child’s right to an open future. Individual consent to transplant is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16. Should we perform kidney transplants on foreign nationals?Marie-Chantal Fortin & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12):821-826.
    In Canada, there are currently no guidelines at either the federal or provincial level regarding the provision of kidney transplantation services to foreign nationals (FN). Renal transplant centres have, in the past, agreed to put refugee claimants and other FNs on the renal transplant waiting list, in part, because these patients (refugee claimants) had health insurance through the Interim Federal Health Programme to cover the costs of medication and hospital care. However, severe cuts recently made to this programme have forced (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Facial Allograft Transplantation, Personal Identity, and Subjectivity.J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):449-453.
    An analysis of the identity issues involved in facial allograft transplantation is provided in this paper. The identity issues involved in organ transplantation in general, under both theoretical accounts of personal identity and subjective accounts provided by organ recipients, are examined. It is argued that the identity issues involved in facial allograft transplantation are similar to those involved in organ transplantation in general, but much stronger because the face is so closely linked with personal identity. Recipients of facial allograft transplantation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18. Trolleys, Transplants and Inequality: An Egalitarian Proposal.Peter Baumann - 2022 - Erkenntnis 87 (4):1737-1751.
    This paper deals with the core version of the Trolley Problem. In one case many people favor an act which will bring about the death of one person but save five other persons. In another case most people would refuse to “sacrifice” one person in order to save five other lives. Since the two cases seem similar in all relevant respects, we have to explain and justify the diverging verdicts. Since I don’t find current proposals of a solution convincing, I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. How (not) to think of the ‘dead-donor’ rule.Adam Omelianchuk - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (1):1-25.
    Although much has been written on the dead-donor rule in the last twenty-five years, scant attention has been paid to how it should be formulated, what its rationale is, and why it was accepted. The DDR can be formulated in terms of either a Don’t Kill rule or a Death Requirement, the former being historically rooted in absolutist ethics and the latter in a prudential policy aimed at securing trust in the transplant enterprise. I contend that the moral core (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  20. The donor organ as an ‘object a’: a Lacanian perspective on organ donation and transplantation medicine.Hub Zwart - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):559-571.
    Bioethical discourse on organ donation covers a wide range of topics, from informed consent procedures and scarcity issues up to ‘transplant tourism’ and ‘organ trade’. This paper presents a ‘depth ethics’ approach, notably focussing on the tensions, conflicts and ambiguities concerning the status of the human body. These will be addressed from a psychoanalytical angle. First, I will outline Lacan’s view on embodiment as such. Subsequently, I will argue that, for organ recipients, the donor organ becomes what Lacan refers (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. The Moral Harm of Migrant Carework.Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):53-73.
    Arlie Hochschild glosses the practice of women migrants in poor nations who leave their families behind for extended periods of time to do carework in other wealthier countries as a “global heart transplant” from poor to wealthy nations. Thus she signals the idea of an injustice between nations and a moral harm for the individuals in the practice. Yet the nature of the harm needs a clear articulation. When we posit a sufficiently nuanced “right to care,” we locate the harm (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22. ICU Residents' Views On General Ethical Issues Regarding The Opt-In System Of Deceased Organ Donation In Turkey: A Focus Group Study.Sukran Sevimli - 2022 - Eastern Journal of Medicine 4 (27):641-648.
    This descriptive study explores the views of resident physicians working in intensive care units (ICUs) concerning deceased organ donation and examines the various ethical issues surrounding organ donation encountered by residents. This was a qualitative, descriptive study utilizing solo interviews with participants together with focus group discussions. The participants' experiences and views were elicited via interviews and focus group discussions covering the following topics: ethical thoughts about deceased organ donation, barriers that impede or prevent organ donation, its effect on the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. ICU Residents' Views On General Ethical Issues Regarding The Opt-In System Of Deceased Organ Donation In Turkey: A Focus Group Study.Sukran Sevimli - 2022 - Eastern Journal of Medicine 4 (27):641-648.
    This descriptive study explores the views of resident physicians working in intensive care units (ICUs) concerning deceased organ donation and examines the various ethical issues surrounding organ donation encountered by residents. This was a qualitative, descriptive study utilizing solo interviews with participants together with focus group discussions. The participants' experiences and views were elicited via interviews and focus group discussions covering the following topics: ethical thoughts about deceased organ donation, barriers that impede or prevent organ donation, its effect on the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Gender and ethics committees: Where's the 'different voice'?Donna Dickenson - 2006 - Bioethics 20 (3):115–124.
    Abstract Gender and Ethics Committees: Where’s the Different Voice? -/- Prominent international and national ethics commissions such as the UNESCO Bioethics Commission rarely achieve anything remotely resembling gender equality, although local research and clinical ethics committees are somewhat more egalitarian. Under-representation of women is particularly troubling when the subject matter of modern bioethics so disproportionately concerns women’s bodies, and when such committees claim to derive ‘universal’ standards. Are women missing from many ethics committees because of relatively (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Against the family veto in organ procurement: Why the wishes of the dead should prevail when the living and the deceased disagree on organ donation.Andreas Albertsen - 2019 - Bioethics 34 (3):272-280.
    The wishes of registered organ donors are regularly set aside when family members object to donation. This genuine overruling of the wishes of the deceased raises difficult ethical questions. A successful argument for providing the family with a veto must (a) provide reason to disregard the wishes of the dead, and (b) establish why the family should be allowed to decide. One branch of justification seeks to reconcile the family veto with important ideas about respecting property rights, preserving autonomy, and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. In defense of xenotransplantation research: Because of, not in spite of, animal welfare concerns.Christopher Bobier, Daniel Rodger, Daniel J. Hurst & Adam Omelianchuk - forthcoming - Xenotransplantation.
    It is envisioned that one day xenotransplantation will bring about a future where transplantable organs can be safely and efficiently grown in transgenic pigs to help meet the global organ shortage. While recent advances have brought this future closer, worries remain about whether it will be beneficial overall. The unique challenges and risks posed to humans that arise from transplanting across the species barrier, in addition to the costs borne by non-human animals, has led some to question the value of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Scientific-Philosophical definition of life.Klaus Fröhlich - 2022 - Science and Philosophy 10 (2):188-205.
    There are about 100 different contradictory definitions of life. The definition of life based on symbiosis that is presented here differs fundamentally from them; it gives life a value. So this definition offers a basis for ethical and legal action e.g. in organ transplants. It is based on principles and is not an ad hoc model: Significant processes for life are basis for a theoretical concept. Quality criteria for definitions are employed to control the concept. There is a graduation, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Disruptive Innovation and Moral Uncertainty.Philip J. Nickel - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (3):259-269.
    This paper develops a philosophical account of moral disruption. According to Robert Baker, moral disruption is a process in which technological innovations undermine established moral norms without clearly leading to a new set of norms. Here I analyze this process in terms of moral uncertainty, formulating a philosophical account with two variants. On the harm account, such uncertainty is always harmful because it blocks our knowledge of our own and others’ moral obligations. On the qualified harm account, there is no (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  29. Asia-Pacific Perspectives on the Medical Ethics.Darryl R. J. Macer - 2008 - UNESCO Bangkok.
    A compilation of 16 papers selected from two UNESCO Bangkok Bioethics Roundtables, with research and policy dialogues from different countries in the region. It includes papers on informed consent, ethics committees, communication, organ transplants, traditional medicines and sex selection.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Social Support Is Not the Only Problematic Criterion, But If Used at All, “Lack of Social Support” Should Count in Favor of Listing, Not Against.Maura Priest - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):35-37.
    Berry, Daniels, and Ladin make a strong argument for discontinuing the use of, “lack of social support,” as an organ transplantation listing criterion. This argument, however, actually leads to conclusions much stronger than those that the authors’ propose: The argument works equally well against using, (1) any “psychosocial” factors at all as a listing criterion, and, (2) any criteria other than factors that directly relate to empirically established medical need, and/or empirically established survival rate. Moreover, while the authors rightly point (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The global HLA banking of embryonic stem cells requires further scientific justification.Zubin Master & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (8):45-46.
    There is a widely acknowledged shortage of and an increasing demand for transplantable human organs and tissues (e.g., kidney, heart, lung, liver, cornea) in developed and developing countries around the world. In response to this need, Lott and Savulescu (2007) propose the creation of a human embryonic stem (hESC) bank to facilitate the equitable and efficient dissemination of human leukocyte anti- gen (HLA) matched tissues and organs to patients in need of replacement. Although not an unreasonable proposal, the authors go (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Integridade da pessoa: fundamentação ética para a doação de órgãos e tecidos para transplantação.Marta Dias Barcelos - 2009 - Dissertation, Universidade de Lisboa
    PT. A noção de “pessoa”, pensada a partir do legado antropológico e filosófico do ocidente, afirma-se como uma unidade corporal e espiritual que determina a sua singularidade no seio da comunidade. A “pessoa” assim perspectivada assume uma importância destacada na reflexão ética das aplicações científicas de artificialização da vida humana. Muito concretamente, a noção de “pessoa” deve contribuir para a fundamentação ética das terapêuticas de transplantação. A transplantação representa um dos mais notáveis avanços da medicina do século XX e com (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Pluralismo en torno al significado de la muerte cerebral y/o revisión de la regla del donante fallecido Pluralism about the meaning of brain death and/or the revision of the dead donor rule.David Rodríguez-Arias Vailhen & Alberto Molina Pérez - 2007 - Laguna 21.
    Since 1968, the irreversible loss of functioning of the whole brain, called brain death, is assimilated to individual’s death. The almost universal acceptance of this neurological criterion of death had decisive consequences for the contemporary medicine, such as the withdrawal of mechanical ventilation in these patients and organ retrieval for transplantation. The new criterion was successfully accepted in part because the assimilation of brain death state to death was presented by medicine --and acritically assumed by most of societies-- as a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Hate Speech, the Priority of Liberty, and the Temptations of Nonideal Theory.Robert S. Taylor - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):353-68.
    Are government restrictions on hate speech consistent with the priority of liberty? This relatively narrow policy question will serve as the starting point for a wider discussion of the use and abuse of nonideal theory in contemporary political philosophy, especially as practiced on the academic left. I begin by showing that hate speech (understood as group libel) can undermine fair equality of opportunity for historically-oppressed groups but that the priority of liberty seems to forbid its restriction. This tension between free (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Beyond the Altruistic Donor: Embedding Solidarity in Organ Procurement Policies.María Victoria Martínez-López, Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho, Belén Liedo, Jon Rueda & Alberto Molina-Pérez - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (5):107.
    Altruism and solidarity are concepts that are closely related to organ donation for transplantation. On the one hand, they are typically used for encouraging people to donate. On the other hand, they also underpin the regulations in force in each country to different extents. They are often used indistinctly and equivocally, despite the different ethical implications of each concept. This paper aims to clarify to what extent we can speak of altruism and solidarity in the predominant models of organ donation. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. The ethics of algorithms: mapping the debate.Brent Mittelstadt, Patrick Allo, Mariarosaria Taddeo, Sandra Wachter & Luciano Floridi - 2016 - Big Data and Society 3 (2):2053951716679679.
    In information societies, operations, decisions and choices previously left to humans are increasingly delegated to algorithms, which may advise, if not decide, about how data should be interpreted and what actions should be taken as a result. More and more often, algorithms mediate social processes, business transactions, governmental decisions, and how we perceive, understand, and interact among ourselves and with the environment. Gaps between the design and operation of algorithms and our understanding of their ethical implications can have severe consequences (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   209 citations  
  37. The Ethics of Expectations.Rima Basu - 2023 - In Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, vol 13. Oxford University Press. pp. 149-169.
    This chapter asks two questions about the ethics of expectations: one about the nature of expectations, and one about the wrongs of expectations. On the first question, expectations involve a rich constellation of attitudes ranging from beliefs to also include imaginings, hopes, fears, and dreams. As a result, sometimes expectations act like predictions, like your expectation of rain tomorrow, sometimes prescriptions, like the expectation that your students will do the reading, sometimes like proleptic reasons like the hope that your (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics.Vincent C. Müller - 2020 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encylopedia of Philosophy. pp. 1-70.
    Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics are digital technologies that will have significant impact on the development of humanity in the near future. They have raised fundamental questions about what we should do with these systems, what the systems themselves should do, what risks they involve, and how we can control these. - After the Introduction to the field (§1), the main themes (§2) of this article are: Ethical issues that arise with AI systems as objects, i.e., tools made and used (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  39.  99
    Geographic Location and Moral Arbitrariness in the Allocation of Donated Livers.Douglas MacKay & Samuel Fitz - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):308-319.
    The federal system for allocating donated livers in the United States is often criticized for allowing geographic disparities in access to livers. Critics argue that such disparities are unfair on the grounds that where one lives is morally arbitrary and so should not influence one's access to donated livers. They argue instead that livers should be allocated in accordance with the equal opportunity principle, according to which US residents who are equally sick should have the same opportunity to receive a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. The Ethics of Memory Modification: Personal Narratives, Relational Selves and Autonomy.Przemysław Zawadzki - 2022 - Neuroethics 16 (1).
    For nearly two decades, ethicists have expressed concerns that the further development and use of memory modification technologies (MMTs)—techniques allowing to intentionally and selectively alter memories—may threaten the very foundations of who we are, our personal identity, and thus pose a threat to our well-being, or even undermine our “humaneness.” This paper examines the potential ramifications of memory-modifying interventions such as changing the valence of targeted memories and selective deactivation of a particular memory as these interventions appear to be at (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. The Ethics of Delusional Belief.Lisa Bortolotti & Kengo Miyazono - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (2):275-296.
    In this paper we address the ethics of adopting delusional beliefs and we apply consequentialist and deontological considerations to the epistemic evaluation of delusions. Delusions are characterised by their epistemic shortcomings and they are often defined as false and irrational beliefs. Despite this, when agents are overwhelmed by negative emotions due to the effects of trauma or previous adversities, or when they are subject to anxiety and stress as a result of hypersalient experience, the adoption of a delusional belief (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42. The ethics of algorithms: key problems and solutions.Andreas Tsamados, Nikita Aggarwal, Josh Cowls, Jessica Morley, Huw Roberts, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2021 - AI and Society.
    Research on the ethics of algorithms has grown substantially over the past decade. Alongside the exponential development and application of machine learning algorithms, new ethical problems and solutions relating to their ubiquitous use in society have been proposed. This article builds on a review of the ethics of algorithms published in 2016, 2016). The goals are to contribute to the debate on the identification and analysis of the ethical implications of algorithms, to provide an updated analysis of epistemic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  43. The Ethics of Belief (3rd edition).Rima Basu - forthcoming - In Kurt Sylvan, Ernest Sosa, Jonathan Dancy & Matthias Steup (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Epistemology, 3rd edition. Wiley Blackwell.
    This chapter is a survey of the ethics of belief. It begins with the debate as it first emerges in the foundational dispute between W. K. Clifford and William James. Then it surveys how the disagreements between Clifford and James have shaped the work of contemporary theorists, touching on topics such as pragmatism, whether we should believe against the evidence, pragmatic and moral encroachment, doxastic partiality, and doxastic wronging.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The ethics of digital well-being: a thematic review.Christopher Burr, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2313–2343.
    This article presents the first thematic review of the literature on the ethical issues concerning digital well-being. The term ‘digital well-being’ is used to refer to the impact of digital technologies on what it means to live a life that is good for a human being. The review explores the existing literature on the ethics of digital well-being, with the goal of mapping the current debate and identifying open questions for future research. The review identifies major issues related to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  45. The ethics of digital well-being: a thematic review.Christopher Burr, Mariarosaria Taddeo & Luciano Floridi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2313–⁠2343.
    This article presents the first thematic review of the literature on the ethical issues concerning digital well-being. The term ‘digital well-being’ is used to refer to the impact of digital technologies on what it means to live a life that isgood fora human being. The review explores the existing literature on the ethics of digital well-being, with the goal of mapping the current debate and identifying open questions for future research. The review identifies major issues related to several key (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  46. The Ethics of Belief: It’s not just Trump supporters who believe wrongly—it’s all of us.Nathan Nobis - 2021 - Political Animal Magazine.
    An introduction of the ethics of belief and application to current political debates, with the observation that people of all political persuasions have beliefs that are not based on strong evidence. -/- Also posted on Cardiff's "Open for Debate" blog.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Ethics of Belief (from a Philosophical Perspective).Jonathan Ichikawa - manuscript
    This chapter surveys a few of the central questions about philosophical perspectives on the ethics of belief, focusing especially on (1) questions about whether doxastic involuntarism is consistent with the normative approach to epistemology characteristic of any ethics of belief; (2) the status and interpretation of William Clifford's famous injunction against belief on "insufficient" evidence, and broader questions about the role of negative versus positive doxastic norms; (3) whether norms governing belief are distinctively epistemic norms, or are instead (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Ethics of Deliberate Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 to Induce Immunity.Robert Streiffer, David Killoren & Richard Y. Chappell - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):479-496.
    We explore the ethics of deliberately exposing consenting adults to SARS-CoV-2 to induce immunity to the virus (“DEI” for short). We explain what a responsible DEI program might look like. We explore a consequentialist argument for DEI according to which DEI is a viable harm-reduction strategy. Then we consider a non-consequentialist argument for DEI that draws on the moral significance of consent. Additionally, we consider arguments for the view that DEI is unethical on the grounds that, given that large-scale (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49. A fair exchange: why living kidney donors in England should be financially compensated.Daniel Rodger & Bonnie Venter - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (4):625-634.
    Every year, hundreds of patients in England die whilst waiting for a kidney transplant, and this is evidence that the current system of altruistic-based donation is not sufficient to address the shortage of kidneys available for transplant. To address this problem, we propose a monopsony system whereby kidney donors can opt-in to receive financial compensation, whilst still preserving the right of individuals to donate without receiving any compensation. A monopsony system describes a market structure where there is only one ‘buyer’—in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50. The ethics of uncertainty for data subjects.Philip Nickel - 2019 - In Peter Dabrock, Matthias Braun & Patrik Hummel (eds.), The Ethics of Medical Data Donation. Springer Verlag. pp. 55-74.
    Modern health data practices come with many practical uncertainties. In this paper, I argue that data subjects’ trust in the institutions and organizations that control their data, and their ability to know their own moral obligations in relation to their data, are undermined by significant uncertainties regarding the what, how, and who of mass data collection and analysis. I conclude by considering how proposals for managing situations of high uncertainty might be applied to this problem. These emphasize increasing organizational flexibility, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 999