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  1. Before and Beyond Leibniz: Tschirnhaus and Wolff on Experience and Method.Corey W. Dyck - manuscript
    In this chapter, I consider the largely overlooked influence of E. W. von Tschirnhaus' treatise on method, the Medicina mentis, on Wolff's early philosophical project (in both its conception and execution). As I argue, part of Tschirnhaus' importance for Wolff lies in the use he makes of principles gained from experience as a foundation for the scientific enterprise in the context of his broader philosophical rationalism. I will show that this lesson from Tschirnhaus runs through Wolff's earliest philosophical discussions, and (...)
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  2. Questions of Race in Leibniz's Logic.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics.
    This essay is part of larger project in which I attempt to show that Western formal logic, from its inception in Aristotle onward, has both been partially constituted by, and partially constitutive of, what has become known as racism. More specifically, (a) racist/quasi-racist/proto-racist political forces were part of the impetus for logic’s attempt to classify the world into mutually exclusive, hierarchically-valued categories in the first place; and (b) these classifications, in turn, have been deployed throughout history to justify and empower (...)
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  3. Leibniz on Number Systems.Lloyd Strickland - 2024 - In Bharath Sriraman (ed.), Handbook of the History and Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. Springer. pp. 167-197.
    This chapter examines the pioneering work of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716) on various number systems, in particular binary, which he independently invented in the mid-to-late 1670s, and hexadecimal, which he invented in 1679. The chapter begins with the oft-debated question of who may have influenced Leibniz’s invention of binary, though as none of the proposed candidates is plausible I suggest a different hypothesis, that Leibniz initially developed binary notation as a tool to assist his investigations in mathematical problems that were (...)
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  4. Leibniz on Possibilia, Creation, and the Reality of Essences.Peter Myrdal, Arto Repo & Valtteri Viljanen - 2023 - Philosophers' Imprint 23 (17).
    This paper reconsiders Leibniz’s conception of the nature of possible things and offers a novel interpretation of the actualization of possible substances. This requires analyzing a largely neglected notion, the reality of individual essences. Thus far scholars have tended to construe essences as representational items in God’s intellect. We acknowledge that finite essences have being in the divine intellect but insist that they are also grounded in the infinite essence of God, as limitations of it. Indeed, we show that it (...)
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  5. Why Did Leibniz Invent Binary?Lloyd Strickland - 2023 - In Wenchao Li, Charlotte Wahl, Sven Erdner, Bianca Carina Schwarze & Yue Dan (eds.), »Le present est plein de l’avenir, et chargé du passé«. Gottfried-Wilhelm-Leibniz-Gesellschaft e.V.. pp. 354-360.
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  6. How Leibniz tried to tell the world he had squared the circle.Lloyd Strickland - 2023 - Historia Mathematica 62:19-39.
    In 1682, Leibniz published an essay containing his solution to the classic problem of squaring the circle: the alternating converg-ing series that now bears his name. Yet his attempts to disseminate his quadrature results began seven years earlier and included four distinct approaches: the conventional (journal article), the grand (treatise), the impostrous (pseudepigraphia), and the extravagant (medals). This paper examines Leibniz’s various attempts to disseminate his series formula. By examining oft-ignored writings, as well as unpublished manuscripts, this paper answers the (...)
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  7. F Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Hexadecimal.Lloyd Strickland & Owain Daniel Jones - 2023 - The Mathematical Intelligencer 45:126-130.
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  8. The global/local distinction vindicates Leibniz's theodicy.James Franklin - 2022 - Theology and Science 20 (4).
    The essential idea of Leibniz’s Theodicy was little understood in his time but has become one of the organizing themes of modern mathematics. There are many phenomena that are possible locally but for purely mathematical reasons impossible globally. For example, it is possible to build a spiral staircase that is rising at any given point, but it is impossible to build one that is rising at all points and comes back to where it started. The necessity is mathematically provable, so (...)
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  9. In the Beginning Was Binary.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - Church Times 8322.
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  10. An Unpublished Manuscript of Leibniz's on Duodecimal.Lloyd Strickland - 2022 - The Duodecimal Bulletin 1 (54z):26z-30z.
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  11. Leibniz on Binary: The Invention of Computer Arithmetic.Lloyd Strickland & Harry R. Lewis - 2022 - Cambridge, MA, USA: The MIT Press.
    The first collection of Leibniz's key writings on the binary system, newly translated, with many previously unpublished in any language. -/- The polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716) is known for his independent invention of the calculus in 1675. Another major—although less studied—mathematical contribution by Leibniz is his invention of binary arithmetic, the representational basis for today's digital computing. This book offers the first collection of Leibniz's most important writings on the binary system, all newly translated by the authors with many (...)
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  12. Are infinite explanations self-explanatory?Alexandre Billon - 2021 - Erkenntnis 88 (5):1935-1954.
    Consider an infinite series whose items are each explained by their immediate successor. Does such an infinite explanation explain the whole series or does it leave something to be explained? Hume arguably claimed that it does fully explain the whole series. Leibniz, however, designed a very telling objection against this claim, an objection involving an infinite series of book copies. In this paper, I argue that the Humean claim can, in certain cases, be saved from the Leibnizian “infinite book copies” (...)
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  13. La matemática mixta en las investigaciones de G. W. Leibniz.José Gustavo Morales - 2021 - Culturas Cientificas 2 (2):42-52.
    Para favorecer la interacción disciplinar y recuperar la dimensión práctica del conocimiento matemático en la escuela secundaria, Yves Chevallard plantea la necesidad de introducir en los programas de estudio la matemática mixta. La matemática mixta, cuyo apogeo tuvo lugar en Europa entre los siglos XVI y XVIII, se propone el abordaje de problemas surgidos por fuera de la propia matemática valiéndose de nociones mecánicas -como la de centro de gravedad y fuerza centrífuga- y del empleo de variados instrumentos para realizar (...)
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  14. The Idea of Continuity as Mathematical-Philosophical Invariant.Eldar Amirov - 2019 - Metafizika 2 (8):p. 87-100.
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  15. Leibniz’s Legacy and Impact.Julia Weckend & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This volume tells the story of the legacy and impact of the great German polymath Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Leibniz made significant contributions to many areas, including philosophy, mathematics, political and social theory, theology, and various sciences. The essays in this volume explores the effects of Leibniz’s profound insights on subsequent generations of thinkers by tracing the ways in which his ideas have been defended and developed in the three centuries since his death. Each of the 11 essays is concerned (...)
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  16. Leibniz y las matemáticas: Problemas en torno al cálculo infinitesimal / Leibniz on Mathematics: Problems Concerning Infinitesimal calculus.Alberto Luis López - 2018 - In Luis Antonio Velasco Guzmán & Víctor Manuel Hernández Márquez (eds.), Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz: Las bases de la modernidad. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. pp. 31-62.
    El cálculo infinitesimal elaborado por Leibniz en la segunda mitad del siglo XVII tuvo, como era de esperarse, muchos adeptos pero también importantes críticos. Uno pensaría que cuatro siglos después de haber sido presentado éste, en las revistas, academias y sociedades de la época, habría ya poco qué decir sobre el mismo; sin embargo, cuando uno se acerca al cálculo de Leibniz –tal y como me sucedió hace tiempo– fácilmente puede percatarse de que el debate en torno al cálculo leibniziano (...)
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  17. Is Leibnizian calculus embeddable in first order logic?Piotr Błaszczyk, Vladimir Kanovei, Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. Katz, Taras Kudryk, Thomas Mormann & David Sherry - 2017 - Foundations of Science 22 (4):73 - 88.
    To explore the extent of embeddability of Leibnizian infinitesimal calculus in first-order logic (FOL) and modern frameworks, we propose to set aside ontological issues and focus on pro- cedural questions. This would enable an account of Leibnizian procedures in a framework limited to FOL with a small number of additional ingredients such as the relation of infinite proximity. If, as we argue here, first order logic is indeed suitable for developing modern proxies for the inferential moves found in Leibnizian infinitesimal (...)
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  18. Necessity, a Leibnizian Thesis, and a Dialogical Semantics.Mohammad Shafiei - 2017 - South American Journal of Logic 3 (1):1-23.
    In this paper, an interpretation of "necessity", inspired by a Leibnizian idea and based on the method of dialogical logic, is introduced. The semantic rules corresponding to such an account of necessity are developed, and then some peculiarities, and some potential advantages, of the introduced dialogical explanation, in comparison with the customary explanation offered by the possible worlds semantics, are briefly discussed.
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  19. Tercentenary Essays on the Philosophy & Science of G.W. Leibniz.Lloyd Strickland, Erik Vynckier & Julia Weckend - 2017 - Cham: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book presents new research into key areas of the work of German philosopher and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716). Reflecting various aspects of Leibniz's thought, this book offers a collection of original research arranged into four separate themes: Science, Metaphysics, Epistemology, and Religion and Theology. With in-depth articles by experts such as Maria Rosa Antognazza, Nicholas Jolley, Agustín Echavarría, Richard Arthur and Paul Lodge, this book is an invaluable resource not only for readers just beginning to discover Leibniz, but (...)
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  20. Automating Leibniz’s Theory of Concepts.Paul Edward Oppenheimer, Jesse Alama & Edward N. Zalta - 2015 - In Felty Amy P. & Middeldorp Aart (eds.), Automated Deduction – CADE 25: Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Automated Deduction (Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence: Volume 9195), Berlin: Springer. Springer. pp. 73-97.
    Our computational metaphysics group describes its use of automated reasoning tools to study Leibniz’s theory of concepts. We start with a reconstruction of Leibniz’s theory within the theory of abstract objects (henceforth ‘object theory’). Leibniz’s theory of concepts, under this reconstruction, has a non-modal algebra of concepts, a concept-containment theory of truth, and a modal metaphysics of complete individual concepts. We show how the object-theoretic reconstruction of these components of Leibniz’s theory can be represented for investigation by means of automated (...)
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  21. Nicholas Rescher, Leibniz and Cryptography: An Account on the Occasion of the Initial Exhibition of the Reconstruction of Leibniz’s Cipher Machine. [REVIEW]Stephen Puryear - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 67 (4):882-884.
    In Part 1 of this short book, Rescher provides an overview of the nature and source of Leibniz’s interest in the theory and practice of cryptanalysis, including his unsuccessful bid to secure an apprentice for John Wallis (1616-1703) with a view to perpetuating the Englishman’s remarkable deciphering abilities. In Part 2, perhaps the most interesting part of the book, Rescher offers his account of the inner workings of Leibniz’s cipher machine. Part 3 provides a brief pictorial history of such machines (...)
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  22. The view of the types of representation in Leibniz and their main influences.Manuel Sánchez Rodríguez - 2013 - Cultura:271-295.
    Aunque no es posible ofrecer aquí un análisis detallado de las diferentes cues tionesimplicadas en la teoría de las representaciones en la Modernidad, sí pode mos atender auno de sus aspectos más relevantes, presente en la exposición de Leibniz, Wolff,Baumgarten y Kant, a saber: el reconocimiento progresivo y la vin dicación de unconocimiento específicamente sensible como un tipo específico de conocimiento en lafilosofía escolar alemana del siglo XVIII. A pesar de que Leibniz atribuye al conocimiento claro y confuso el grado (...)
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  23. Logic and Existence.Daniel W. Smith - 2011 - Chiasmi International 13:361-377.
    Logique et existenceDeleuze à propos des « conditions du réel »Pour Deleuze, l’un des problèmes fondamentaux d’une théorie de la pensée est de savoir comment la pensée peut quitter la sphère du possible pour penser le réel, c’est-àdire pour penser l’existence elle-même. La position du réel semble être hors du concept. Des pré-kantiens comme Leibniz approchaient ce problème par le biais de la distinction entre vérités d’essence et vérités d’existence, alors que des post-kantiens comme Maimon l’approchaient par la distinction entre (...)
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  24. La superación por Leibniz de la lógica aristotélica.Leticia Cabañas Agrela - 2010 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía:67-74.
    El punto de partida del calculus universalis leibniziano es la teoría aristotélica del silogismo, pero Leibniz se independiza de las ideas de Aristóteles para desarrollar su propio sistema lógico, mucho más general, aplicando el instrumento combinatorio a la silogística. Lo que propone es una importante modificación del modelo demostrativo axiomático, mediante la creación de cálculos lógico-simbólicos que no se limitan a los ámbitos tradicionales de la deducción, sino que admiten procedimientos discursivos más complejos que los de la lógica clásica, ampliando (...)
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  25. Deleuze, Leibniz and Projective Geometry in the Fold.Simon Duffy - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (2):129-147.
    Explications of the reconstruction of Leibniz’s metaphysics that Deleuze undertakes in 'The Fold: Leibniz and the Baroque' focus predominantly on the role of the infinitesimal calculus developed by Leibniz.1 While not underestimat- ing the importance of the infinitesimal calculus and the law of continuity as reflected in the calculus of infinite series to any understanding of Leibniz’s metaphysics and to Deleuze’s reconstruction of it in The Fold, what I propose to examine in this paper is the role played by other (...)
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  26. Leibniz, Mathematics and the Monad.Simon Duffy - 2010 - In Sjoerd van Tuinen & Niamh McDonnell (eds.), Deleuze and The fold: a critical reader. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 89--111.
    The reconstruction of Leibniz’s metaphysics that Deleuze undertakes in The Fold provides a systematic account of the structure of Leibniz’s metaphysics in terms of its mathematical foundations. However, in doing so, Deleuze draws not only upon the mathematics developed by Leibniz—including the law of continuity as reflected in the calculus of infinite series and the infinitesimal calculus—but also upon developments in mathematics made by a number of Leibniz’s contemporaries—including Newton’s method of fluxions. He also draws upon a number of subsequent (...)
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  27. Infinitesimal Differences: Controversies Between Leibniz and his Contemporaries. [REVIEW]Françoise Monnoyeur-Broitman - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):527-528.
    Leibniz is well known for his formulation of the infinitesimal calculus. Nevertheless, the nature and logic of his discovery are seldom questioned: does it belong more to mathematics or metaphysics, and how is it connected to his physics? This book, composed of fourteen essays, investigates the nature and foundation of the calculus, its relationship to the physics of force and principle of continuity, and its overall method and metaphysics. The Leibnizian calculus is presented in its origin and context together with (...)
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  28. Continuidade na lógica de Leibniz.Vivianne Moreira - 2010 - Analytica (Rio) 14 (1):103-137.
    This paper is intended to examine Leibniz's Principle of Continuity, as well as the conditions of its application in leibnizian infinitesimal calculus, in the light of some aspects of formal language developed by Leibniz. It aims at evaluating whether, and to what extent, that principle can be justified on the basis of the logic of Leibniz.
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  29. Genesis and Difference: Deleuze, Maimon, and the Post-Kantian Reading of Leibniz.Daniel W. Smith - 2010 - In Sjoerd van Tuinen & Niamh McDonnell (eds.), Deleuze and The fold: a critical reader. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  30. Realidade do ideal e substancialidade do mundo em Leibniz: percorrendo e sobrevoando o labirinto do contínuo.William de Siqueira Piauí - 2009 - Dissertation, Usp, Brazil
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  31. Ramus and Leibniz on analysis.Andreas Blank - 2008 - In Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Leibniz: What Kind of Rationalist? Springer. pp. 155--166.
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  32. The differential point of view of the infinitesimal calculus in Spinoza, Leibniz and Deleuze.Simon Duffy - 2006 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 37 (3):286-307.
    In Hegel ou Spinoza,1 Pierre Macherey challenges the influence of Hegel’s reading of Spinoza by stressing the degree to which Spinoza eludes the grasp of the Hegelian dialectical progression of the history of philosophy. He argues that Hegel provides a defensive misreading of Spinoza, and that he had to “misread him” in order to maintain his subjective idealism. The suggestion being that Spinoza’s philosophy represents, not a moment that can simply be sublated and subsumed within the dialectical progression of the (...)
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  33. Deleuze on Leibniz : Difference, Continuity, and the Calculus.Daniel W. Smith - 2005 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Current continental theory and modern philosophy. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press.
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  34. Poeta Calculans: Harsdorffer, Leibniz, and the "Mathesis Universalis".Jan C. Westerhoff - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (3):449.
    This paper seeks to indicate some connections between a major philosophi- cal project of the seventeenth century, the conception of a mathesis universalis, and the practice of baroque poetry. I shall argue that these connections consist in a peculiar view of language and systems of notation which was particularly common in European baroque culture and which provided the necessary conceptual background for both poetry and the mathesis universalis.
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  35. Arcanum Artis Inveniendi: Leibniz and Analysis.Enrico Pasini - 1997 - In Michael Otte & Marco Panza (eds.), Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 35-46.
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  36. Llull and Leibniz: The Logic of Discovery.John R. Welch - 1990 - Catalan Review 4:75-83.
    Llull and Leibniz both subscribed to conceptual atomism: the belief that the majority of concepts are compounds constructed from a relatively small number of primitive concepts. Llull worked out techniques for finding the logically possible combinations of his primitives, but Leibniz criticized Llull’s execution of these techniques. This article argues that Leibniz was right about things being more complicated than Llull thought but that he was wrong about the details. The paper attempts to correct these details.
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  37. Topology and Leibniz's principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles.Mormann Thomas - manuscript
    The aim of this paper is to show that topology has a bearing on Leibniz’s Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles (PII). According to (PII), if, for all properties F, an object a has property F iff object b has property F, then a and b are identical. If any property F whatsoever is permitted in PII, then Leibniz’s principle is trivial, as is shown by “identity properties”. The aim of this paper is to show that topology can make a (...)
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  38. Comments on Mark Kalderon's “The Open Question Argument, Frege's Puzzle, and Leibniz's Law”.Peter Alward - unknown
    A standard strategy for defending a claim of non-identity is one which invokes Leibniz’s Law. (1) Fa (2) ~Fb (3) (∀x)(∀y)(x=y ⊃ (∀P)(Px ⊃ Py)) (4) a=b ⊃ (Fa ⊃ Fb) (5) a≠b In Kalderon’s view, this basic strategy underlies both Moore’s Open Question Argument (OQA) as well as (a variant formulation of) Frege’s puzzle (FP). In the former case, the argument runs from the fact that some natural property—call it “F-ness”—has, but goodness lacks, the (2nd order) property of its (...)
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