Results for 'Homer'

38 found
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  1. Maternity and Mortality in Homeric Poetry.Sheila Murnaghan - 1992 - Classical Antiquity 11 (2):242-264.
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  2. Nietzsche's Early Political Thinking: "Homer on Competition".Timothy H. Wilson - 2005 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 9 (1).
    The paper is a close reading of Nietzsche's early essay, "Homer on Competition". It explores the understanding of nature as strife presented in that essay, how this strife channels itself into cultural or state forms, and how these forms cultivate the creative individual or genius. The article concludes by asserting that Nietzsche's central point in "Homer on Competition" concerns the contest across the ages that is fought by these geniuses. For Nietzsche, therefore, competition has a political significance — (...)
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  3. "El cuerpo" como problema hermenéutico en la lectura los textos homéricos.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2016 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 25:245-257.
    El objetivo de este trabajo es doble. Primero se recuerda cierta reserva metodológica relevante para una lectura hermenéutica de los poemas homéricos. En segundo lugar se intenta comprender cómo algo que ya se parece a nuestra dualidad de "el cuerpo" y "la mente" pudo generarse a partir de lo que originalmente era un fenómeno unitario. A modo de cierre se apunta asimismo hacia la cuestión de en qué sentido precisamente este fenómeno unitario juega un papel importante en la crítica de (...)
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  4. Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Imaginary: The Balance, the Pyramid, and the Round River.Henry Dicks - 2014 - Environmental Philosophy 11 (2):175-209.
    Aldo Leopold accorded great significance to the images he used to describe both the land and humankind’s relation to it. Focusing on three key images of Leopold’s “ecological imaginary”—the balance, the pyramid, and the round river—this article argues that the most profound of these is the round river. Contrasting this image with James Lovelock’s portrayal of the earth as Gaia, it further argues that Leopold’s round river can be interpreted as a contemporary, ecological reworking of the primordial, Homeric experience of (...)
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  5. Noesis and Logos in Plato's Statesman, with a Focus on the Visitor's Jokes at 266a-D.Mitchell Miller - 2017 - In John Sallis (ed.), Plato's Statesman: Dialectic, Myth, and Politics. pp. 107-136.
    In his “Noesis and Logos in the Eleatic Trilogy, with a Focus on the Visitor’s Jokes at Statesman 266a-d,” Mitchell Miller explores the interplay of intuition and discourse in the Statesman. He prepares by considering the orienting provocations provided by Socrates’ refutations of the proposed definition of knowledge — namely, “true judgment and a logos” — in the closing pages of the Theaetetus, by the Eleatic Visitor’s obscure schematization at Sophist 253d-e of the kinds of eidetic field discerned by dialectic, (...)
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  6.  40
    El llanto y la pólis.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - Madrid: La Oficina de Arte y Ediciones.
    Partiendo de Homero, se emprende una lectura de ciertas tragedias de Sófocles y de Eurípides. Alcestis muere por la belleza; Medea se queda en el aire; la casa se ha corrompido y la pólis ha caído enferma. Para implantar el nuevo proyecto político y apostar con determinación por la igualdad ciudadana, la pólis debía contener el llanto y reprimir las lágrimas por los parientes muertos, lo cual exigía contener y reprimir a las mujeres. Este ensayo intenta comprender en qué sentido (...)
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  7. Hacia Una Interpretación de la Odisea (I).Aida Míguez Barciela - 2013 - Laguna. Revista de Filosofía 32:9-26.
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  8. Hacia una interpretación de la Odisea (II).Aida Míguez Barciela - 2013 - Laguna. Revista de Filosofía 33:9-27.
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  9. Observaciones en torno a Penélope.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2013 - Ágora. Estudos Clássicos Em Debate 15:11-31.
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  10.  32
    De Libros.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - Café Montaigne 6:xx.
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  11.  79
    The Lex of the Earth? Arendt’s Critique of Roman Law.Shinkyu Lee - 2021 - Journal of International Political Theory 17 (3):394-411.
    How political communities should be constituted is at the center of Hannah Arendt’s engagement with two ancient sources of law: the Greek nomos and the Roman lex. Recent scholarship suggests that Arendt treats nomos as imperative and exclusive while lex has a relationship-establishing dimension and that for an inclusive form of polity, she favors lex over nomos. This article argues, however, that Arendt’s appreciation occurs within a general context of more reservations about Rome than Roman-centric interpretations admit. Her writings show (...)
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  12. Metrik im altsprachlichen Unterricht (Ars Didactica - Marburger Beiträge zu Studium und Didaktik der Alten Sprachen; Bd. 4).Magnus Frisch (ed.) - 2018 - Speyer: Kartoffeldruck-Verlag Kai Broderse.
    Metrisch gebundene Texte sind aus dem altsprachlichen Unterricht nicht wegzudenken: Vergil, Ovid, Horaz, Catull und Martial sind nur einige typische Autoren für die Dichtungslektüre im Lateinunterricht; Homer, Sophokles und Euripides sind typische Beispiele für den Griechischunterricht. Die Curricula schlagen eine Vielzahl poetischer Texte als mögliche Lektüren vor. Allein diese unvollständige Autorenauswahl zeigt schon, dass man allein mit der Behandlung von daktylischem Hexameter und elegischem Distichon nicht besonders weit kommt, will man nicht die Textauswahl nach solchen rein formalen Kriterien unnötig (...)
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  13. Comunidad y desarraigo. Aproximación al fenómeno pólis.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2009 - Isegoría. Revista de Filosofía Moral y Política 40:203-219.
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  14.  95
    Foundations of Ancient Ethics/Grundlagen Der Antiken Ethik.Jörg Hardy & George Rudebusch - 2014 - Göttingen, Germany: Vandenhoek.
    This book is an anthology with the following themes. Non-European Tradition: Bussanich interprets main themes of Hindu ethics, including its roots in ritual sacrifice, its relationship to religious duty, society, individual human well-being, and psychic liberation. To best assess the truth of Hindu ethics, he argues for dialogue with premodern Western thought. Pfister takes up the question of human nature as a case study in Chinese ethics. Is our nature inherently good (as Mengzi argued) or bad (Xunzi’s view)? Pfister ob- (...)
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  15. Amistad y/o Lealtad En la Ilíada.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - In Éxodos y geopolítica.
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  16. Ἦ Μάλα Θαῦμα Κύων Ὅδε Κεῖτ᾽ Ἐνὶ Κόπρῳ. The Anagnorisis of Odysseus and His Dog Argos (Hom. Od. 17, 290–327).Magnus Frisch - 2017 - Literatūra - Research Journal for Literary Scholarship 59 (3):7-18.
    In the Odyssey, there is a description of Odysseus being recognized by his age-old and decrepit dog Argos, whom he had reared and trained himself before his departure for Troy. This so-called Argos episode (Od. 17.290–327) is still famous today. It has been continuously treated by generations of scholars from antiquity to our time and served as an inspiration to both the visual arts and literature. The present article deals with the function and intended effects of the Argos scene. After (...)
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  17.  20
    Preparations for a Structuralist Study of Cannibalism in Greek Myth.P. Winston Fettner - manuscript
    This essay argues that the Ancient Greek's tales of cannibalism were not really about cannibalism at all, but about more typically Greek issues (such as the transfer of political power, the guest-host relationship, the initiation of youths into adulthood, and so on). Cannibalism is rather the image used to designate the negative extremes of human behavior as conceived by the Hellenic world: social breakdown, barbarism, reversion to animality, and ultimately, the inability to live under the institution of the polis.
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  18. An Introduction to Aristotle’s Metaphysics of Time: Historical Research Into the Mythological and Astronomical Conceptions That Preceded Aristotle’s Philosophy.Régis Laurent (ed.) - 06/11/2015 - Villegagnons-Plaisance Ed..
    This study of Greek time before Aristotle’s philosophy starts with a commentary on his first text, the Protrepticus. We shall see two distinct forms of time emerge: one initiatory, circular and Platonic in inspiration, the other its diametrical opposite, advanced by Aristotle. We shall explore this dichotomy through a return to poetic conceptions. The Tragedians will give us an initial outline of the notion of time in the Greek world (Fate); we shall then turn to Homer in order to (...)
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  19. Metaphysique du Temps Chez Aristote I.: Recherches Historiques Sur les Conceptions Mythologiques Et Astronomiques Précédant la Philosophie Aristotélicienne. I.Régis Laurent (ed.) - 16/04/2009 - Villegagnons-Plaisance Ed..
    Notre étude sur le temps grec précédant la pensée d Aristote commencera d'abord par un commentaire de son premier texte, le Protreptique. Nous verrons se dégager deux temps distincts : l'un initiatique, circulaire et d'inspiration platonicienne, et l'autre diamétralement opposé dont Aristote serait le défenseur. Afin d'interroger cette dichotomie, nous retournerons aux conceptions poétiques. Les Tragiques nous permettront d'offrir une première esquisse de cette notion dans l'univers grec (Du destin...). Ensuite, l'oeuvre épique d'Homère sera l'occasion de mieux saisir le nouage (...)
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  20. Good Sense, Art, and Morality in Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’.Reed Winegar - 2011 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):17-35.
    In his essay ‘Of the Standard of Taste,’ Hume argues that artworks with morally flawed outlooks are, to some extent, aesthetically flawed. While Hume's remarks regarding the relationship between art and morality have influenced contemporary aestheticians, Hume's own position has struck many people as incoherent. For Hume appears to entangle himself in two separate contradictions. First, Hume seems to claim both that true judges should not enter into vicious sentiments and that true judges should adopt the standpoint of an artwork's (...)
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  21. Starting From the Muses: Engaging Moral Imagination Through Memory’s Many Gifts.Guy Axtell - forthcoming - In Brian Robinson (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Amusements. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    In Greek mythology the Muses –patron goddesses of fine arts, history, humanities, and sciences– are tellingly portrayed as the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, the goddess Memory, who is of the race of Titans, older still than Zeus and other Olympian deities. The relationship between memory and such fields as epic poetry, history, music and dance is easily recognizable to moderns. But bards/poets like Homer and Hesiod, who began oral storytelling by “invoking the Muses” with their audience, knew well (...)
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  22. Nature, Spontaneity, and Voluntary Action in Lucretius.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2013 - In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press.
    In twenty important passages located throughout De rerum natura, Lucretius refers to natural things happening spontaneously (sponte sua; the Greek term is automaton). The most important of these uses include his discussion of the causes of: nature, matter, and the cosmos in general; the generation and adaptation of plants and animals; the formation of images and thoughts; and the behavior of human beings and the development of human culture. In this paper I examine the way spontaneity functions as a cause (...)
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  23. What Do We Mean by 'Forgiveness?': Some Answers From the Ancient Greeks.Maria Magoula Adamos & Julia B. Griffin - 2013 - Forgiveness:Philosophy, Psychology, and the Arts.
    There seems to be confusion and disagreement among scholars about the meaning of interpersonal forgiveness. In this essay we shall venture to clarify the meaning of forgiveness by examining various literary works. In particular, we shall discuss instances of forgiveness from Homer’s The Iliad, Euripides’ Hippolytus, and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and we shall focus on the changes that the concept of forgiveness has gone through throughout the centuries, in the hope of being able to understand, and therefore, of being (...)
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  24. Identidad y poder en las sociedades de control.Antonio Tudela Sancho - 2009 - Revista de Filosofía (Venezuela) 61 (1):7-37.
    La finalidad del presente ensayo consiste en partir de las nociones interrelacionadas de "capitalismo mundial integrado" (Guattari) y de "sociedad de control" (Deleuze) para intentar una deriva que cruce géneros, épocas y nombres propios: de la filosofía al cine y a la poesía (caminos de ida y vuelta), de Benjamin a Serres pasando por Homero, Kavafis, Cioran o Godard, del tardío imperio romano y sus incertidumbres a la imprecisión de nuestro propio tiempo. Posiblemente, pensar hoy la identidad humana sea como (...)
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  25. The Ubiquity of Humanity and Textuality in Human Experience.Daihyun Chung - 2015 - Humanities 4 (4):885-904.
    Abstract: The so-called “crisis of the humanities” can be understood in terms of an asymmetry between the natural and social sciences on the one hand and the humanities on the other. While the sciences approach topics related to human experience in quantificational or experimental terms, the humanities turn to ancient, canonical, and other texts in the search for truths about human experience. As each approach has its own unique limitations, it is desirable to overcome or remove the asymmetry between them. (...)
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  26. Hobbes and Historiography: Why the Future, He Says, Does Not Exist.Patricia Springborg - 2000 - In G. A. J. Rogers & Tom Sorell (eds.), Hobbes and History. Routledge. pp. 44--72.
    Hobbes's interest in the power of the Image was programmatic, as suggested by his shifts from optics, to sensationalist psychology, to the strategic use of classical history, exemplified by Thucydides and Homer. It put a great resource at the disposal of the state-propaganda machine, with application to the question of state-management and crowd control.
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  27.  47
    Classical Modeling and the Circulation of Concepts in Early Modern Britain.Patricia Springborg - 2005 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 1 (2):223-244.
    It is my thesis that Renaissance classical translations and imitations were often works of political surrogacy in a literary environment characterized by harsh censorship. So, for instance, the works of Homer, Virgil, and Lucan were read as coded texts, that ranged across the political spectrum.
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  28.  34
    Review of Balot, Greek Political Thought. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:13.
    Balot’s (B.) Greek Political Thought aims to provide an “introductory guide” for undergraduate and graduate students to ancient Greek thinkers (broadly construed) from Homer through Epicurus who wrote in both systematic and unsystematic ways about life in the Greek polis (viii). B. notes that he has not tried to locate his arguments within current scholarly discussions (although he does include a 19 page bibliographic essay that provides an overview of Anglophone scholarship on Greek political thought). Nonetheless, he states that (...)
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  29. Miarą Jest Każdy Z Nas: Projekt Zwolenników Zmienności Rzeczy W Platońskim Teajtecie Na Tle Myśli Sofistycznej (Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought).Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2009 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
    Each of us is a measure. The project of advocates of change in Plato’s Theaetetus as compared with sophistic thought -/- Summary -/- One of the most intriguing motives in Plato’s Theaetetus is its historical-based division of philosophy, which revolves around the concepts of rest (represented by Parmenides and his disciples) and change (represented by Protagoras, Homer, Empedocles, and Epicharmus). This unique approach gives an opportunity to reconstruct the views of marginalized trend of early Greek philosophy - so called (...)
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  30. Nietzsche's Early Political Thinking II: "The Greek State".Timothy H. Wilson - 2013 - Minerva - An Internet Journal of Philosophy 17 (1).
    This paper uses an extended discussion of Nietzsche’s essay “The Greek State” to uncover the political aspects of his early thinking. The paper builds on a similar discussion of another essay from the same period, “Homer on Competition,” in arguing that Nietzsche’s thinking is based on a confrontation with the work of Plato. It is argued that the key to understanding “The Greek State” is seeing it, in its entirety, as an enigmatic interpretation and re-writing of Plato’s Republic. Nietzsche (...)
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  31. [La Visión de Los 7 Sabios. Un Diccionario Intraducible].Aida Míguez Barciela - 2020 - Muy Historia 5:12-19.
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  32. Nature Trouble: Ancient Physis and Queer Performativity.Emanuela Bianchi - 2019 - In Emanuela Bianchi, Sara Brill & Brooke Holmes (eds.), Antiquities Beyond Humanism. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 211-238.
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  33. Der Schiffbrüchige Odysseus Oder: Wie Arkesilaos Zum Skeptiker Wurde.Michael Lurie - 2014 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 158 (1):183-186.
    The paper proposes a new interpretation of Timon's attack on Arcesilaus in fr. 806 SH.
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  34. "Mujer" y "naturaleza" en el pensamiento griego antiguo.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2019 - In Género y mujeres en el mediterráneo antiguo.
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  35.  84
    A Propósito de "Of Suicide".Aida Míguez Barciela - 2017 - In La historia y la nada. Madrid: La Oficina.
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  36.  65
    Justice, Knowledge, Life and Death: Philosophical Revelations From Plato, Ayer, Sartre and Heidegger Some Suggestions for Those New to Philosophy.Mike Sutton - 2016 - Academia.Edu.
    "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" by John Keats, may seem archaic now, especially its language. But it expresses the poet's delight and excitement when he discovers a new literary revelation, hitherto hidden from him. He makes an intellectual discovery. I've had this sense of discovery when reading philosophy. Some new approach, some new idea, has made me see a concept I thought I understood in a different and more rigorous way; made me re- examine what I thought I'd (...)
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  37.  80
    Tapping the Wellsprings of Action: Aristotle's Birth of Tragedy as a Mimesis of Poetic Praxis.Katherine Kretler - 2018 - In Bruce M. King & Doherty Lillian (eds.), Thinking the Greeks: A Volume in Honour of James M. Redfield. London and New York: pp. 70-90.
    This essay offers an interpretation of Aristotle’s account of the birth of tragedy (Poetics 1448b18–1449a15) as a mimesis of poetic praxis. The workings of this passage emerge when read in connection with ring composition in Homeric speeches, and further unfold through a comparison with the Shield of Achilles and with an ode from Euripides’ Heracles. Aristotle appears to draw upon a traditional pattern enacting cyclical rebirth or revitalization. It is suggested that his puzzling insistence on “one complete action” in plot (...)
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  38. "Macrocosm/Microcosm in Doric Thought".W. Lindsay Wheeler - 2011 - Self-Published.
    This article is about a very important metaphysical concept, macrocosm/microcosm and its appearance in Doric thought which in turn influenced Socrates and Plato. But since this concept has been gainsaid and negated in recent articles and distorted by some ancient thinkers it will be necessary to conduct reconstructive surgery to restore it to its pristine condition. Hopefully, this paper will illustrate how metaphysics is done with the use of the Mind's eye, in the reading of reality that was part and (...)
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