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  1. El debate sobre Plato und die Dichter y su inscripción en el contexto de Alemania Nacional-Socialista: una discusión con lecturas de la teoría política.Facundo Bey - 2019 - Ekstasis: Revista de Hermenéutica y Fenomenologí 8 (1):138-163.
    Hans-Georg Gadamer, en su conferencia Plato und die Dichter (1934), desarrolló una investigación fenomenológica excepcional de filosofía ético-política de Platón y del lugar que el arte ocupa en ella. En mediados de la década de 1990, la escritora mexicana Teresa Orozco publicó una serie de escritos en los cuales acusa a Gadamer de haberse colocado, a través de la exhibición y publicación de este trabajo, a servicio del nacional-socialismo. Este artículo busca discutir los argumentos presentados por Orozco y otros autores, (...)
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  2. Teleology, Causation and the Atlas Motif in Plato's Phaedo.Daniel Vazquez - 2020 - Schole 14 (1):82-103.
    In this paper, I propose a new reading of Phaedo 99b6-d2. My main thesis is that in 99c6-9, Socrates does not refer to the teleological αἰτία but to the αἰτία that will be provided by a stronger ‘Atlas’ (99c4-5). This means that the passage offers no evidence that Socrates abandons teleology or modifies his views about it. He acknowledges, instead, that he could not find or learn any αἰτία stronger than the teleological one. This, I suggest, allows an interpretation of (...)
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  3. Plato: Ancient Philosophies, 8. [REVIEW]Seamus O'Neill - 2011 - Mouseion 11 (1):122-126.
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  4. Rosen's ‘a Creature of Modern Scholarship’ -- A Reply.T. Brickhouse & N. Smith - 1998 - Polis 15 (1-2):13-22.
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  5. The Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Timaeus.Josh Wilburn - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):627-652.
    in the tripartite psychology of the Republic, Plato characterizes the “spirited” part of the soul as the “ally of reason”: like the auxiliaries of the just city, whose distinctive job is to support the policies and judgments passed down by the rulers, spirit’s distinctive “job” in the soul is to support and defend the practical decisions and commands of the reasoning part. This is to include not only defense against external enemies who might interfere with those commands, but also, and (...)
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  6. Colloquium 6: When The Middle Comes Early: Puzzles And Perplexeties In Plato’s Dialogues.Miriam Byrd - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):187-209.
    In this paper I focus on the problem of accounting for apparent inconsistencies between Plato’s early and middle works. Developmentalism seeks to account for these variances by differentiating a Socratic philosophy in the early dialogues from a Platonic philosophy in the middle. In opposition to this position, I propose an alternative explanation: differences between these two groups are due to Plato’s depiction and use of middle period epistemology. I argue that, in the early dialogues, Plato depicts Socrates’ use of the (...)
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  7. Where Epistemology and Religion Meet What Do(Es) the God(s) Look Like?Maria Michela Sassi - 2013 - Rhizomata 1 (2):283-307.
    The focus of this essay is on Xenophanes’ criticism of anthropomorphic representation of the gods, famously sounding like a declaration of war against a constituent part of the Greek religion, and adopting terms and a tone that are unequalled amongst “pre-Socratic” authors for their directness and explicitness. While the main features of Xenophanes’ polemic are well known thanks to some of the most studied fragments of the pre-Socratic tradition, a different line of enquiry from the usual one is attempted by (...)
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  8. Plato on the Desire for the Good.Rachel Barney - 2010 - In Sergio Tenenbaum (ed.), Desire, Practical Reason, and the Good. Oxford University Press. pp. 34--64.
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  9. Motivasi Kerja Guru Ditinjau Dari Self-Efficacy Dan Iklim Sekolah (Studi Pada Guru-Guru Yayasan ”X”). Yufita & Yohanes Budiarto - 2010 - Phronesis (Misc) 8 (2).
    As education institution, school has the biggest role to achieve education qualities. Teacher as the actor of education activities is the important constituent in a school. Highly working motivated teachers should be able to motivate the students in order to get good academic results. Teachers working motivation has affected by teacher’s self efficacy and the organizational climate at school. This research will investigate the influence of teacher’s self efficacy and organizational climate at school to teachers in five schools which hold (...)
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  10. Akrasia and Self-Rule in Plato's Laws.Joshua Wilburn - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:25-53.
    In this paper I challenge the commonly held view that Plato acknowledges and accepts the possibility of akrasia in the Laws. I offer a new interpretation of the image of the divine puppet in Book 1 - the passage often read as an account of akratic action -- and I show that it is not intended as an illustration of akrasia at all. Rather, it provides the moral psychological background for the text by illustrating a broader notion of self-rule as (...)
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  11. Socrates and the True Political Craft.J. Clerk Shaw - 2011 - Classical Philology 106:187-207.
    This paper argues that Socrates does not claim to be a political expert at Gorgias 521d6-8, as many scholars say. Still, Socrates does claim a special grasp of true politics. His special grasp (i) results from divine dispensation; (ii) is coherent true belief about politics; and (iii) also is Socratic wisdom about his own epistemic shortcomings. This condition falls short of expertise in two ways: Socrates sometimes lacks fully determinate answers to political questions, and he does not grasp the first (...)
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  12. Tripartition and the Causes of Criminal Behavior in Laws Ix.Joshua Wilburn - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):111-134.
    In this paper I argue that, despite what many commentators have concluded, Plato’s division of three psychological “causes” of criminal behavior at Laws 863b1-e3 (anger, pleasure, and ignorance) is not intended to invoke the tripartite theory of the soul. I suggest that the focus of the division is on an alternative moral psychological picture, one which is better suited to the criminal penology of Book 9. However, I argue, this alternative picture is nonetheless consistent with tripartite theory.
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  13. Elementos Hipotácticos En la Composición de la Odisea.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2014 - Pensar la Traducción. La Filosofía de Camino Entre Las Lenguas.
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  14. Inclusiones Virtuales En la Ilíada: El Eídolon de Patroclo y Algunas Estrategias Narrativas.Aida Míguez Barciela - 2007 - Ontology Studies 7:284-291.
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  15. The Logic of Plato's Feminism.Nicholas Smith - 1980 - Journal of Social Philosophy 11 (3):5-11.
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Plato: Early Socratic Dialogues
  1. Socrates on Why We Should Inquire.David Ebrey - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):1-17.
    This paper examines whether Socrates provides his interlocutors with good reasons to seek knowledge of what virtue is, reasons that they are in a position to appreciate. I argue that in the Laches he does provide such reasons, but they are not the reasons that are most commonly identified as Socratic. Socrates thinks his interlocutors should be motivated not by the idea that virtue is knowledge nor by the idea that knowledge is good for its own sake, but rather by (...)
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  2. Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato’s Early Dialogues.Alexander Nehamas - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):717-721.
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  3. Essay Review of Eva Brann, The Music of the Republic. [REVIEW]Mitchell Miller - 2007 - International Journal of the Classical Tradition 13 (4):628-633.
    The essays in this collection, though ranging in their keys from the teacherly to the scholarly, are united by their search for the deepest questions Plato gives us. The title essay on the Republic is a paradigm case, exploring with a mix of speculative daring and Socratic pleasure in aporia the ring structure of the dialogue, the emergent perspective of a "knowing soul," dianoetic eikasia, and the implicit presence of the One and the Dyad in the metaphysical figures of the (...)
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  4. Approaching Plato: A Guide to the Early and Middle Dialogues.Mark Anderson & Ginger Osborn - manuscript
    Approaching Plato is a comprehensive research guide to all (fifteen) of Plato’s early and middle dialogues. Each of the dialogues is covered with a short outline, a detailed outline (including some Greek text), and an interpretive essay. Also included (among other things) is an essay distinguishing Plato’s idea of eudaimonia from our contemporary notion of happiness and brief descriptions of the dialogues’ main characters.
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Plato: Middle Dialogues
  1. Aristophanic Tragedy.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2017 - In Z. Giannopoulou & P. Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Critical Guide to Plato’s Symposium. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 70-87.
    In this paper, I offer a new interpretation of Aristophanes’ speech in Plato’s Symposium. Though Plato deliberately draws attention to the significance of Aristophanes’ speech in relation to Diotima’s (205d-206a, 211d), it has received relatively little philosophical attention. Critics who discuss it typically treat it as a comic fable, of little philosophical merit (e.g. Guthrie 1975, Rowe 1998), or uncover in it an appealing and even romantic treatment of love that emphasizes the significance of human individuals as love-objects to be (...)
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  2. Approaching Plato: A Guide to the Early and Middle Dialogues.Mark Anderson & Ginger Osborn - manuscript
    Approaching Plato is a comprehensive research guide to all (fifteen) of Plato’s early and middle dialogues. Each of the dialogues is covered with a short outline, a detailed outline (including some Greek text), and an interpretive essay. Also included (among other things) is an essay distinguishing Plato’s idea of eudaimonia from our contemporary notion of happiness and brief descriptions of the dialogues’ main characters.
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Plato: Late Dialogues
  1. Can Δίκαιον Be Ὅσιον? A Note on Scholl. Plat. Resp. I 344a8 and Leg. IX 857b5.Domenico Cufalo - 2015 - Literatūra 57 (3):16-19.
    In this paper I will focus on a crux in two Platonic scholia, where manuscripts have the impossible διονύσιον, but Greene suggests δίκαιον. This amendment was made on the basis of a gloss of Photius’ Lexicon, although the corresponding gloss of Suidas confirms the text of Platonic scholia. However the agreement with Photius is not so important, not only because it is impossible to prove that he reproduces the text of the glossary composed by the Atticist Aelius Dionysius without any (...)
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  2. Commentary on Clay.Mitchell Miller - 1987 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):158-164.
    Acknowledging with Professor Clay the important methodological principle that interpretation must begin within the dramatic horizon of each dialogue, I argue that there are analogies between discontinuities within single dialogues and discontinuities between certain dialogues. Recognizing this opens up the possibility of thinking of certain groups of dialogues as a series of fresh beginnings that lead the reader through different levels of understanding. I illustrate this idea by considering the unity of the Republic and the Parmenides.
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Plato: Alcibiades I
  1. Relações entre a noção de “cuidado-da-alma” e o “conhecimento de si” no Primeiro Alcibíades.Marcos Sidnei Pagotto-Euzebio - 2017 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 38 (1):93-108.
    O artigo busca apresentar as relações entre as exigências de cuidado-da-alma e a necessidade do conhecimento-de-si presentes no diálogo platônico Primeiro Alcibíades, indicando a forte ligação de tal aperfeiçoamento de si com o da pólis. Também as dimensões erótica, teológica, ética e política se encontram firmemente unidas no diálogo, visto que a formação do homem político exige o vínculo entre discípulo e mestre, sendo este o guia em direção ao reconhecimento da divindade, pois conhecer-se significa, ao final, conhecer a alma (...)
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  2. Autoengaño, ambición y arrogancia en el Alcibíades de Platón.Daniel Vázquez - 2016 - In J. M. Roqueñi (ed.), Afectividad y confianza en el conocimiento personal. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 13-30.
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  3. A relação entre a Alma e o Cuidado de Si no Alcibíades I de Platão.Luiz Felipe da Silva Carvalho - 2015 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
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  4. Authenticity of Alcibiades I: Some Reflections. Jirsa - 2009 - Listy filologicke 132 (3-4):225-244.
    This text maps the history of debate on the authenticity of Plato's or pseudo-Plato's Alcibiades I.
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Plato: Apology
  1. A CAÇA À SABEDORIA: a sophia a partir da Apologia de Platão.Carlos Augusto de Oliveira Carvalhar - 2020 - Dissertation, UFRJ, Brazil
    This is a study of sophía from the passage 20d-21a in Plato’s Apology. There, Socrates tries to understand what kind of wisdom he would have, since the Oracle of Delphi stated that no one would be wiser than him. An investigation of historical aspects was made to understand the trial of Socrates and conviction, also a mapping of sophía’s main uses through the corpus platonicum was built, as well an overview of the usage of this concept by others greek authors. (...)
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  2. What Rules and Laws Does Socrates Obey.David Lévystone - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 57:57-75.
    Socrates ́ thought of justice and obedience to laws is moti- vated by a will to avoid the destructive effects of Sophistic criti- cisms and theories of laws. He thus requires–against theories of natural law–an almost absolute obedience to the law, as far as this law respects the legal system of the city. But, against legal positivism, Socrates would not admit that a law is just simply because it is a law: he is looking for the true Just. However, as (...)
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  3. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  4. The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry.Mitchell Miller - 2008 - Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
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  5. Thomas Aquinas – Human Dignity and Conscience as a Basis for Restricting Legal Obligations.Marek Piechowiak - 2016 - Diametros 47:64-83.
    In contemporary positive law there are legal institutions, such as conscientious objection in the context of military service or “conscience clauses” in medical law, which for the sake of respect for judgments of conscience aim at restricting legal obligations. Such restrictions are postulated to protect human freedom in general. On the basis of Thomas Aquinas’ philosophy, it shall be argued that human dignity, understood as the existential perfection of a human being based on special unity, provides a foundation for imposing (...)
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  6. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  7. Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):204-207.
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  8. Introduction to "Sophistae".Rafael Ferber - 2014 - In Fulvia de Luise & Alessandro Stavru (eds.), Socratica III. Academia Verlag. pp. 201-203.
    Plato’s “Apology of Socrates” is a masterpiece of the philosophical literature. The question remains as to how much it has been influenced by earlier works, e.g. of Gorgias of Leontinoi and Euripides. Nevertheless, comparative studies on Hippolytus’ defense in Euripides’ tragedy of the same name, on Gorgias’ “Defense of Palamedes” and on Plato’s “Apology” do not exist. The short paper gives an introduction into the status quaestionis.
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Plato: Charmides
  1. Minimal Sartre: Diagonalization and Pure Reflection.John Bova - 2018 - Open Philosophy 1:360-379.
    These remarks take up the reflexive problematics of Being and Nothingness and related texts from a metalogical perspective. A mutually illuminating translation is posited between, on the one hand, Sartre’s theory of pure reflection, the linchpin of the works of Sartre’s early period and the site of their greatest difficulties, and, on the other hand, the quasi-formalism of diagonalization, the engine of the classical theorems of Cantor, Godel, Tarski, Turing, etc. Surprisingly, the dialectic of mathematical logic from its inception through (...)
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  2. The Implicit Refutation of Critias 1.Tad Brennan - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):240-250.
    Abstract At Charmides 163, Critias attempts to extricate himself from refutation by proposing a Prodicean distinction between praxis and poiēsis . I argue that this distinction leads him further into contradictions.
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  3. How to Discriminate Between Experts and Frauds: Some Problems for Socratic Peirastic.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (3):227 - 246.
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Plato: Clitophon
  1. Just Silence in Plato’s Clitophon.Shane Gassaway - 2019 - Polis 36 (2):266-288.
    Plato’s Clitophon presents a confrontation between two alternative views of justice, one conventional and the other philosophical – and of Clitophon’s inability to move from the one to the other due to his confusion over the relationship between knowledge and virtue and his misconception of the path from ignorance to knowledge, which probably results from his ambition. The nature of this confusion is such that Clitophon can only overcome it by abandoning his submissive stance toward the authority of Socrates, which (...)
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Plato: Cratylus
  1. Plato on Conventionalism.Rachel Barney - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (2):143 - 162.
    A new reading of Plato's account of conventionalism about names in the Cratylus. It argues that Hermogenes' position, according to which a name is whatever anybody 'sets down' as one, does not have the counterintuitive consequences usually claimed. At the same time, Plato's treatment of conventionalism needs to be related to his treatment of formally similar positions in ethics and politics. Plato is committed to standards of objective natural correctness in all such areas, despite the problematic consequences which, as he (...)
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Plato: Crito
  1. What Rules and Laws Does Socrates Obey.David Lévystone - 2019 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 57:57-75.
    Socrates ́ thought of justice and obedience to laws is moti- vated by a will to avoid the destructive effects of Sophistic criti- cisms and theories of laws. He thus requires–against theories of natural law–an almost absolute obedience to the law, as far as this law respects the legal system of the city. But, against legal positivism, Socrates would not admit that a law is just simply because it is a law: he is looking for the true Just. However, as (...)
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  2. Because I Said So: Practical Authority in Plato’s Crito.Micah Lott - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):3-31.
    This essay is an analysis of the central arguments in Plato’s Crito. The dialogue shows, in a variety of ways, that the opinion of another person can have practical relevance in one’s deliberations about what to do – e.g. as an argument, as a piece of expert advice, as a threat. Especially important among these forms of practical relevance is the relevance of authoritative commands. In the dialogue, the Laws of Athens argue that Socrates must accept his sentence of death, (...)
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  3. The Value of Rule in Plato’s Dialogues: A Reply to Melissa Lane.David Ebrey - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:75-80.
    A reply to Melissa Lane's "Antianarchia: interpreting political thought in Plato" In these comments I focus on how to think of antianarchia as an element of Plato's political thought, and in doing so raise some methodological questions about how to read Plato’s dialogues, focusing on what is involved in attributing views to Plato in general.
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  4. Platonic Mimesis.Mitchell Miller - 1999 - In Thomas Falkner, Nancy Felson & David Konstan (eds.), Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue. pp. 253-266.
    A two-fold study, on the one hand of the thought-provoking mimesis by which Plato gives his hearer an occasion for self-knowledge and self-transcendence and of the typical sequential structure, an appropriation of the trajectory of the poem of Parmenides, by which Plato orders the drama of inquiry, and on the other hand a commentary on the Crito that aims to show concretely how these elements — mimesis and Parmenidean structure — work together to give the dialogues their exceptional elicitative power.
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  5. Socrates.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Socrates_ presents a compelling case for some life-changing conclusions that follow from a close reading of Socrates' arguments. Offers a highly original study of Socrates and his thought, accessible to contemporary readers Argues that through studying Socrates we can learn practical wisdom to apply to our lives Lovingly crafted with humour, thought-experiments and literary references, and with close reading sof key Socratic arguments Aids readers with diagrams to make clear complex arguments.
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  6. Socrates and the Gods [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):204-207.
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  7. Socrates and Superiority.Nathan Hanna - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (2):251-268.
    I propose an alternative interpretation of the Crito. The arguments that are typically taken to be Socrates’ primary arguments against escape are actually supplementary arguments that rely on what I call the Superiority Thesis, the thesis that the state and its citizens are members of a moral hierarchy where those below are tied by bonds of obligation to those above. I provide evidence that Socrates holds this thesis, demonstrate how it resolves a number of apparent difficulties and show why my (...)
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  8. Two Kinds of Lawlessness: Plato's Crito.Ann Congleton - 1974 - Political Theory 2 (4):432-446.
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Plato: Euthyphro
  1. Euthyphro and the Logic of Miasma.Maureen Eckert - 2019 - Logos and Episteme 10 (1):51-60.
    Euthyphro is a Socratic interlocutor claiming enormous religious expertise, while his portrayal in the eponymous dialogue raises questions the reliability of his beliefs. This paper closely examines how Euthyphro justifies his case against his father, identifying an argument that relies on the concept of miasma. In so far as miasma is considered in isolation, Euthyphro has a good argument. Unfortunately, there is more than miasma at stake when considering why one could prosecute one’s own parent. Introducing the other relevant concepts, (...)
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  2. Identity and Explanation in the Euthyphro.David Ebrey - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:77-111.
    According to many interpreters, Socrates in the Euthyphro thinks that an answer to ‘what is the holy?’ should pick out some feature that is prior to being holy. While this is a powerful way to think of answers to the ‘what is it?’ question, one that Aristotle develops, I argue that the Euthyphro provides an important alternative to this Aristotelian account. Instead, an answer to ‘what is the holy?’ should pick out precisely being holy, not some feature prior to it. (...)
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