Results for 'pop'

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Andrei Pop
Universität Basel
Constantin Pop
Rutgers University - New Brunswick
Rodica Pop
Al.I.Cuza Iasi University of Iasi
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Bibliography: Pop Culture in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Population Ecology in Philosophy of Biology
Bibliography: Populations in Philosophy of Biology
Bibliography: Karl Popper in 20th Century Philosophy
Bibliography: Popular Music in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Population Genetics in Philosophy of Biology
Bibliography: Population Ethics in Value Theory, Miscellaneous
Bibliography: Popper: Epistemology in 20th Century Philosophy
Bibliography: Popper: Metaphysics in 20th Century Philosophy
Bibliography: Popper: Philosophy of Science in 20th Century Philosophy
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  1. Race: Deflate or Pop?Adam Hochman - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 57.
    Neven Sesardic has recently defended his arguments in favour of racial naturalismthe view that race is a valid biological categoryin response to my criticism of his (...) work. While Sesardic claims that a strong version of racial naturalism can survive critique, he has in fact weakened his position considerably. He concedes that conventional racial taxonomy is arbitrary and he no longer identifiesracesas human subspecies. Sesardic now relies almost entirely on Theodosius Dobzhanskys notion of race-as-population. This weak approach torace’—according to which all genetic difference between populations isracialandthe racesare simply the populations we choose to call racessurvived its early critiques. As it is being mobilised to support racial naturalism once more, we need to continue the debate about whether we should weaken the concept of race to meanpopulation’, or abandon it as a failed biological category. I argue that Sesardics case for racial naturalism is only supported by his continued mischaracterisation of anti-realism about biological race and his appeal to Dobzhanskys authority. Rather than deflating the meaning ofrace’, it should be eliminated from our biological ontology. (shrink)
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  2. Values of the Human Person. Contemporary Challenges.Pop Mihaela (ed.) - 2014 - Bucharest: Editura Universității din București.
    Contemporary knowledge is centered on the research on human dimensions. Philosophy should particularly appeal to values in the process of understanding the human nature. The valuablebecoming (...)
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  3. "What I Hear is Thinking Too": Deleuze and Guattari Go Pop.Daniel W. Smith & Timothy S. Murphy - 2001 - Echo 3 (1).
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  4. Ameliorative Measures to Improve Strategic Development in a Construction Company.Andrei – Dumitru Pop - 2020 - Dissertation, Aalborg University
    This master thesis is dealing with analysing the lack of strategy in a Romanian construction company. Making an analysis of the external environment and internal factors has (...)
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  5. an Apocalypse of Pop, Pt II: Vox Lux.Paul Bali - manuscript
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  6. an Apocalypse of Pop, Pt I: Max Martin and the '90s, the Noughts.Paul Bali - manuscript
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  7.  47
    Artistas mecánicos: Una mirada a la capacidad estética de máquinas y algoritmos desde la música pop y el pop art.Leonardo Arriagada - 2021 - Calle 14 Revista De Investigación En El Campo Del Arte 16 (29):54-66.
    A pesar de los enormes avances que ha tenido la inteligencia artificial (IA) y la robótica, aún es polémico afirmar que una máquina pueda crear arte. Contrario (...)
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  8. Legg-Hutter Universal Intelligence Implies Classical Music is Better Than Pop Music for Intellectual Training.Samuel Alexander - 2019 - The Reasoner 13 (11):71-72.
    In their thought-provoking paper, Legg and Hutter consider a certain abstrac- tion of an intelligent agent, and define a universal intelligence measure, which assigns every such (...)agent a numerical intelligence rating. We will briefly summarize Legg and Hutters paper, and then give a tongue-in-cheek argument that if ones goal is to become more intelligent by cultivating music appreciation, then it is bet- ter to use classical music (such as Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven) than to use more recent pop music. The same argument could be adapted to other media: books beat films, card games beat first-person shooters, parables beat dissertations, etc. We leave it to the reader to decide whether this argument tells us something about classical music, something about Legg-Hutter intelligence, or something about both. (shrink)
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  9.  84
    Listening to Other Minds: A Phenomenology of Pop Songs.Enrico Terrone - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (4):435-453.
    This paper explores some phenomenological consequences of the ontological affinity between films and pop songs. Given the central place of the recording technology in both films and (...)
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  10.  80
    Arte, política y sociedad de consumo. El caso de Andy Warhol.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2011 - Memoria, Revista de Política y Cultura 249 (249):37-39.
    Andy Warhol (1928-1987), considerado por muchos como el más importante y emblemático artista estadounidense, sigue despertando, a más de 20 años de su muerte, un renovado (...)interés interpretativo, acompañado de no pocas polémicas que evidencian criterios encontrados y lecturas diversas. Siendo el principal representante del Pop Art, Warhol concentró en mismo y en su obra los atributos fundamentales de toda una nueva etapa del desarrollo del arte, caracterizada por una especie de salto mortal desde lo que había sido hasta los años cincuenta del siglo XX el paradigma por excelencia del buen arte y del gusto refinado, sobre todo en los medios artísticos estadounidenses: el expresionismo abstracto. El arte pop le devolvía un contenido figurativo al arte, pero, a diferencia de épocas anteriores, extraía ese contenido de los objetos más comunes de la cultura de masas de la sociedad de su tiempo. (shrink)
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  11. Cinephilia and Philosophia: Or, Why I Don'T Show The Matrix in Philosophy 101.Timothy Yenter - 2017 - In Rashna Wadia Richards & David T. Johnson (eds.), For the Love of Cinema: Teaching Our Passion In and Outside the Classroom. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    The shelves of film and philosophy books should have made it considerably easier to teach with films in introductory philosophy classes, and certainly many philosophers have found (...)
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  12. Getting Fundamental About Doing Physics in The Big Bang.Jon Lawhead - 2012 - In Dean Kowalski (ed.), The Big Bang Theory and Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 99-111.
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  13. The Rise of the Robots and the Crisis of Moral Patiency.John Danaher - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):129-136.
    This paper adds another argument to the rising tide of panic about robots and AI. The argument is intended to have broad civilization-level significance, but to (...)involve less fanciful speculation about the likely future intelligence of machines than is common among many AI-doomsayers. The argument claims that the rise of the robots will create a crisis of moral patiency. That is to say, it will reduce the ability and willingness of humans to act in the world as responsible moral agents, and thereby reduce them to moral patients. Since that ability and willingness is central to the value system in modern liberal democratic states, the crisis of moral patiency has a broad civilization-level significance: it threatens something that is foundational to and presupposed in much contemporary moral and political discourse. I defend this argument in three parts. I start with a brief analysis of an analogous argument made in pop culture. Though those arguments turn out to be hyperbolic and satirical, they do prove instructive as they illustrates a way in which the rise of robots could impact upon civilization, even when the robots themselves are neither malicious nor powerful enough to bring about our doom. I then introduce the argument from the crisis of moral patiency, defend its main premises and address objections. (shrink)
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  14. Complements, Not Competitors: Causal and Mathematical Explanations.Holly Andersen - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axw023.
    A finer-grained delineation of a given explanandum reveals a nexus of closely related causal and non- causal explanations, complementing one another in ways that yield further (...)explanatory traction on the phenomenon in question. By taking a narrower construal of what counts as a causal explanation, a new class of distinctively mathematical explanations pops into focus; Langes characterization of distinctively mathematical explanations can be extended to cover these. This new class of distinctively mathematical explanations is illustrated with the Lotka-Volterra equations. There are at least two distinct ways those equations might hold of a system, one of which yields straightforwardly causal explanations, but the other of which yields explanations that are distinctively mathematical in terms of nomological strength. In the first, one first picks out a system or class of systems, finds that the equations hold in a causal -explanatory way; in the second, one starts with the equations and explanations that must apply to any system of which the equations hold, and only then turns to the world to see of what, if any, systems it does in fact hold. Using this new way in which a model might hold of a system, I highlight four specific avenues by which causal and non- causal explanations can complement one another. (shrink)
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  15. Epistemic Paternalism Online.Clinton Castro, Adam Pham & Alan Rubel - 2020 - In Guy Axtell & Amiel Bernal (eds.), Epistemic Paternalism. London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 29-44.
    New media (highly interactive digital technology for creating, sharing, and consuming information) affords users a great deal of control over their informational diets. As a result, many (...)
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  16. I Think Therefore I Persist.Matt Duncan - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (4):740-756.
    Suppose that you're lying in bed. You just woke up. But you're alert. Your mind is clear and you have no distractions. As you lie there (...), you think to yourself, ‘2 + 2 = 4.’ The thought just pops into your head. But, wanting to be sure of your mathematical insight, you once again think2 + 2 = 4’, this time really meditating on your thought. Now suppose that you're sitting in an empty movie theatre. The lighting is normal and the screen in front of you is blank. Then at some point an image of a peach is flashed on the screen. The image isn't up there for long. In fact, it's only on the screen for what seems like an instantjust long enough for you to see it. These two scenarios are a bit mundane. But, as I will show, reflection on them can yield significant results concerning the nature of persons and their persistence through time. First I will show that thought and perception have temporal constraints whereby your thinking or perceiving in the above scenarios implies that you exist through a temporally.. (shrink)
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  17. Russellian Acquaintance Revisited.Ian Proops - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):779-811.
    It is sometimes claimed that in his 1912 work, "The Problems of Philosophy" (POP), and possibly as early ason Denoting”, Russell conceives of the mind (...)'s acquaintance with sense-data as providing an indubitable or certain foundation for empirical knowledge. However, although he does say things suggestive of this view in certain of his 1914 works, Russell also makes remarks in POP that conflict with any such broadly "Cartesian" interpretation of this work. This paper attempts to resolve this apparent tension, while also offering a close examination of Russell's views on the nature of acquaintance and their relationship to certain ideas in William James. (shrink)
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  18. The Demarcation Problem: a (Belated) Response to Laudan.Massimo Pigliucci - 2013 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 9.
    Thedemarcation problem,” the issue of how to separate science from pseu- doscience, has been around since fall 1919at least according to Karl Pop- pers (1957 (...)) recollection of when he first started thinking about it. In Poppers mind, the demarcation problem was intimately linked with one of the most vexing issues in philosophy of science, David Humes problem of induction (Vickers 2010) and, in particular, Humes contention that induction cannot be logically justified by appealing to the fact thatit works,” as that in itself is an inductive argument, thereby potentially plunging the philosopher straight into the abyss of a viciously circular argument. (shrink)
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  19. Leibniz's Solution to the Problem of Evil: Franklin Leibniz on Evil.James Franklin - 2003 - Think 2 (5):97-101.
    It would be a moral disgrace for God (if he existed) to allow the many evils in the world, in the same way it would be for (...) a parent to allow a nursery to be infested with criminals who abused the children. • There is a contradiction in asserting all three of the propositions: God is perfectly good; God is perfectly powerful; evil exists (since if God wanted to remove the evils and could, he would). • The religious believer has no hope of getting away with excuses that evil is not as bad as it seems, or that it is all a result of free will, and so on. Piper avoids mentioning the best solution so far put forward to the problem of evil. It is Leibnizs theory that God does not create a better world because there isnt onethat is, that (contrary to appearances) if one part of the world were improved, the ramifications would result in it being worse elsewhere, and worse overall. It is abump in the carpettheory: push evil down here, and it pops up over there. Leibniz put it by saying this is theBest of All Possible Worlds”. That phrase was a public relations disaster for his theory, suggesting as it does that everything is perfectly fine as it is. He does not mean that, but only that designing worlds is a lot harder than it looks, and determining the amount of evil in the best one is no easy matter. Though humour is hardly appropriate to the subject matter, the point of Leibnizs idea is contained in the old joke, “An optimist is someone who thinks this is the best of all possible worlds, and a pessimist thinks.. (shrink)
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  20. Hume and Edwards on 'Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing?'.Michael B. Burke - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):355–362.
    Suppose that five minutes ago, to our astonishment, a healthy, full-grown duck suddenly popped into existence on the table in front of us. Suppose further that (...)there was no first time at which the duck existed but rather a last time, T, at which it had yet to exist. Then for each time t at which the duck has existed, there is an explanation of why the duck existed at t: there was a time tearlier than t but later than T such that the duck existed at t’, and it was only to be expected that a healthy duck would survive the brief period from tto t. But would these explanations remove the mystery? Taken collectively, would they explain why the duck has existed since T rather than never having existed at all? Presumably not. But if not, this seems to discredit the style of explanation offered by Hume and Edwards for the infinite regress they hypothesize of causes and effects. (shrink)
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  21. H.O.T. Theory, Concepts, and Synesthesia: A Reply to Adams and Shreve.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (4):443-448.
    In response to Fred Adams and Charlotte Shreves (2016) paper entitledWhat Can Synesthesia Teach Us about Higher Order Theories of Consciousness?”, previously published in Symposion, (...)I argue that H.O.T. theory does have the resources to account for synesthesia and the specific worries that they advance in their paper, such as the relationship between concepts and experience and the ability to handle instances ofpop-outexperiences. (shrink)
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  22. Race and the Feminized Popular in Nietzsche and Beyond.Robin James - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):749-766.
    I distinguish between the nineteenth- to twentieth-century (modernist) tendency to rehabilitate (white) femininity from the abject popular, and the twentieth- to twenty-first-century (postmodernist) tendency to (...)
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  23. The Publicity of Meaning and the Perceptual Approach to Speech Comprehension.Berit Brogaard - 2017 - ProtoSociology 34:144-162.
    The paper presents a number of empirical arguments for the perceptual view of speech comprehension. It then argues that a particular version of phenomenal dogmatism can confer (...)
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  24. AI Alignment Problem: “Human ValuesDonT Actually Exist.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    Abstract. The main current approach to the AI safety is AI alignment, that is, the creation of AI whose preferences are aligned withhuman values.” Many AI (...)
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  25. To Bite or Not to Bite: Twilight, Immortality, and the Meaning of Life.Brendan Shea - 2009 - In Rebecca Housel & J. Jeremy Wisnewski (eds.), Twilight and Philosophy: Vampires, Vegetarians, and the Pursuit of Immortality. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 79-93.
    Over the course of the Twilight series, Bella strives to and eventually succeeds in convincing Edward to turn her into a vampire. Her stated reason for this (...)
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  26. Uncaused BeginningsRevisited.Graham Oppy - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):205-210.
    This paper is a response to William Lane Craig's criticisms of my previous paper "Uncaused Beginnings". I argue that Craig's criticisms do not inflict (...)any damage on the arguments of that earlier paper. (shrink)
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  27. We All Need Mirrors to Remind Us Who We Are: Inherited Meaning and Inherited Selves in Memento.Michael Baur - 2005 - In Paul Tudico & Kimberly Blessing (eds.), Movies and the Meaning of Life: Philosophers Take On Hollywood. Chicago, IL, USA: Open Court Publishing Company. pp. 94-110.
    The movie Memento (2000) broaches several interrelated philosophical questions concerning human knowledge, personal identity, and the human search for meaning. For example, is our knowledge based mainly (...)
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  28. Ought to Believe, Evidential Understanding and the Pursuit of Wisdom.Christos Kyriacou - 2016 - In Pedro Schmechtig & Martin Grajner (eds.), Epistemic Reasons, Norms and Goals. De Gruyter. pp. 383-406.
    It is almost an epistemological platitude that the goal of inquiry is to pursue truth-acquisition and falsity-avoidance. But further reflection on this dual goal of inquiry (...) reveals that the two (sub)goals are in tension because they are inversely proportionate: the more we satisfy the one (sub)goal the less we satisfy the other and vice versa. I elaborate the inverse proportionality point in some detail and bring out its puzzling implications about the normative question of what one ought to believe. As I argue, given the tension between the two (sub)goals, the problem of the correct regulation of belief-fixation pops to the surface. Call thisthe James problemin tribute to William James who first drew attention to the problem. As a responseto the James Problem’, I sketch the contours of a solution to the problem that involves the rather neglected epistemic concepts of understanding and wisdom and links these concepts with the goal of eudaimonia (or living well). The resultant theory constitutes an approach to epistemic normativity that makes little use of the traditional epistemic concepts of truth and knowledge that have historically dominated the field of epistemology. (shrink)
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  29. What Quantum Mechanics Doesn'T Show.Justin P. McBrayer & Dugald Owen - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):163-176.
    Students often invoke quantum mechanics in class or papers to make philosophical points. This tendency has been encouraged by pop culture influences like the film What the (...)
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  30.  60
    Exclusion and Affinity in Physics.Paul Bali - manuscript
    contents -/- i. Nature loves the sphere ii. when the light comes on iii. expansion from a quantum iv. the atom's brisance is defensive, perhaps v. particle (...)
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  31. The Logic of Interactive Dualism.Lorenzo Sleakes - manuscript
    The assumption that known physical laws are sufficient for explaining mental phenomena is flawed from the outset. Qualities such as phenomenal redness do not exist within the (...)
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  32.  78
    The Composite Redesign of Humanitys Nature: a Work in Process.Lantz Miller - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (2):157-164.
    One of the most salient contemporary concerns in academic debates and pop culture alike is the extent to which new technologies may re-cast Homo sapiens. Species (...)members may find themselves encased in a type of existence they deem to be wanting in comparison with their present form, even if the promised form was assured to be better. Plausibly, the concern is not merely fear of change or of the unknown, but rather it arises out of individualsgeneral identification with what they are and what their friends and family are. In altering that identity beyond a point, they lose it and thus lose themselves in a kind of living death. The three volumes analysed in this essay offer widely differing perspectives on the relations between humans and new technology. As the three works reviewed here together make clear, a whole, fully coherent, definitive work on the composite redesign of human nature (CROHN) still has yet to materialize. (shrink)
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  33. Otherness and Identity: The Aesthetics of Men Faced with Toxic Masculinity.Adrian Mróz - 2019 - Kultura I Historia 35 (1):75-90.
    The dynamism between otherness and differences with identity and equivalence provides key ideas for analyzing the process of gender individuation by artistic works. In this article I (...)
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  34.  35
    The Art of Telling the Truth: Language, Power and the Play of the Outside in Michel Foucault.Abhilash G. Nath - 2015 - Dissertation, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi
    In Foucault, thought is spatial, and unfolds within the density of becoming, in the void that separates the subject and the object. It is ontologically independent from (...)
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  35.  51
    Logical Theatrics, or Floes on Flows: Translating Quine with the Shins.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 8 (2).
    I will begin this comparative analysis with Quine, focusing on the front matter and first chapter of Word and Object (alongside From a Logical Point of View (...)
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  36.  45
    Love and the Anatomy of Needing Another.Monique Wonderly - forthcoming - In John Doris & Manuel Vargas (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. Oxford, UK:
    The idea that we need our beloveds has a rich and longstanding history in classic literature, pop culture, social sciences, and of course, philosophical treatments of love. (...)
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  37. American Pieand the Self-Critique of RockNRoll.Michael Baur - 2006 - In William Irwin & Jorge J. E. Gracia (eds.), Philosophy and the Interpretation of Popular Culture. Lanham, MD: pp. 255-273.
    More than thirty-five years after its first release in 1971, Don McLeansAmerican Piestill resonates deeply with music listeners and consumers of popular culture. In (...) a 2001 public poll sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Recording Industry Association of America, McLeans eight-and-a-half-minute masterpiece was ranked number 5 among the 365most memorablesongs of the twentieth century. In 2002, the song was voted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 1997, Garth brooks performedAmerican Pieat a concert in Central Park, and in 2000, pop icon Madonna performed her own version ofAmerican Pieon the soundtrack of her movie The Next Best Thing. In 1999, American Pie became the title of a popularand irreverently comicalcoming-of-age movie starring Jason Biggs (the movie American Pie was followed by American Pie 2 in 2001, American Wedding in 2003, and American Pie PresentBand Camp in 2005). Like the movie to which it lent its name, the songAmerican Piepresents a coming-of-age narrative; and, also like the movie, the song appealed strongly and immediately to its contemporary audience. Three months after its release in November of 1971, the song reached the number one slot on the charts in January of 1972, and it remained in the Top 40 for a total of seventeen weeks (longer than any other single during the year of 1972). Unlike the movie, however, the songAmerican Pieis highly nuanced and sophisticated, containing multiple allusions and layers of meaning which challenge and heighten our understanding of rocknroll music and the possibility of self-reflection and self-critique in popular culture. (shrink)
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  38. Where Them Bloggers At?”: Reflections on Rihanna, Accountability, and Survivor Subjectivity.Alisa Bierria - 2012 - Social Justice 37 (4):101-124.
    Two weeks after reports came to light that singer Chris Brown had physically assaulted and abandoned his girlfriend, famous Barbadian pop star Rihanna, the celebrity blog TMZ (...)
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  39. In Defense of H.O.T. Theory: A Second Reply to Adams and Shreve.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2017 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 4 (2):231-239.
    In Gennaro (2016), I had originally replied to Fred Adams and Charlotte Shreves (2016) paper entitledWhat Can Synesthesia Teach Us About Higher Order Theories of (...)Consciousness?,” previously published in Symposion. I argued that H.O.T. theory does have the resources to account for synesthesia and the specific worries that they advance in their paper, such as the relationship between concepts and experience and the ability to handle instances ofpop-outexperiences. They counter-reply in Adams and Shreve (2017) and also raise further objections to H.O.T. theory which go well beyond the scope of their 2016 paper. In this paper, I offer additional replies to the points they raise in Adams and Shreve (2017). (shrink)
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  40. Dossier Gaialight 2007-2011.Gavin Keeney - manuscript
    Essays and documents in support of the works of Gaialight - DOCUMENTS: The Passion of Jeanne dArt (2007) - Letter to Gaia (2007) - “Art as Such”: This (...)is Not Pop ... (2008) - Writing Toward Darkness (2009) - Scarlett Words: Light America (2009) - The Darklight Elaboration (2010) - The Darklight Elaboration: Zeitgeist or Episteme? (2010) - Cam Girls (2011) - Brooklyn Buzz (2011) - Brooklyn Buzz: The Semi-divine Metropolis (2011) - Reconnaissance: Light War, Mass Surveillance, Video Games (2011) - First Cause (2011) - Met Ladies (2011) - When Cam Girls Met Ladies (2011) / OUTTAKES (2007): 15 Questions About Editioned Art Photography (2007) - A Few Awkward Questions for Francesca Woodman (2007) - October Revolution (2007) . (shrink)
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  41.  10
    Why Interdisciplinary Research in AI is so Important, According to Jurassic Park.Marie Oldfield - 2020 - The Tech Magazine 1 (1):1.
    Why interdisciplinary research in AI is so important, according to Jurassic Park. -/- “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didnt stop (...)
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  42.  25
    Vocational Training Duration and University GraduatesJob Performance in Cross River State, Nigeria.Valentine Joseph Owan, Francisca N. Odigwe & Odim Otu Offem - 2018 - International Journal of Current Research 10 (7):72024-72028.
    This study focused specifically on determining the extent to which duration of vocational training influence university respectively. In achieving this, two research questions were raised and two (...)
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  43.  70
    Феномен взаємопроникнення (задіяння) української та вірменської культур на теренах України.Kateryna Dannyk - 2019 - Наукові Записки НАУКМА: Andquot;ІСТОРІЯ І ТЕОРІЯ КУЛЬТУРИ" 2 (5):35-40.
    У статті розглянуто актуальне явище сучасної культуривзаємопроникнення кількох різних культур (в історико-типологічному сенсі) в Україні. Увагу акцентовано на вірменській меншині як культуротворчій діаспорі України. Досліджено (...)
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  44. Hermeneutica BibliothecariaAntologie Philobiblon (IV).V. István Király - 2009 - Cluj-Napoca, Romania:
    Cuprins CONTUR Re-Introducere sau: Dincolo deteoria şi practicainformării şi documentăriiSpre o hermeneutică posibilă şi necesară Proiectul şi Programul PHILOBIBLON( în noua formulare) FOCUS (...)
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  45. The Philosopher as Artist: Ludwig Wittgenstein Seen Through Edoardo Paolozzi.Wolfgang Huemer - forthcoming - In The philosopher and the Artist: Wittgenstein and Paolozzi. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this article I argue that the strong fascination that Wittgenstein has had for artists cannot be explained primarily by the content of his work, and in (...)
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  46.  38
    Philosophy, Manga, and Ōmori Shōzō.Pierre Bonneels & Masahiro M. M. Morioka - 2018 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 3.
    Why would a philosopher choose to convey his ideas in the form of Manga? This discussion between Masahiro Morioka, author of Manga Introduction to Philosophy, and the (...)
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  47.  75
    And the Time Will Come When You See WeRe All One: The Beatles and Idealistic Monism.Michael Baur - 2006 - In Michael Baur & Steven Baur (eds.), The Beatles and Philosophy: Nothing You Can Think That Can’t Be Thunk. Chicago, IL, USA: pp. 13-24.
    In spite of their lack of interest in traditional philosophy and their explicit disavowals about the deeper meaning of their songs, there are also good reasons to (...)
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  48. The Benefits of Comedy: Teaching Ethics Through Shared Laughter.Christine James - 2005 - Academic Exchange Extra (April).
    Over the last three years I have been fortunate to teach an unusual class, one that provides an academic background in ethical and social and political theory (...)
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