Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Assistant editor: Tyler John (Longview Philanthropy)
View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories
Subcategories:
History/traditions: Biomedical Ethics

3309 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 3309
Material to categorize
  1. Utilitarianism on the Front Lines: COVID-19, Public Ethics, and the "Hidden Assumption" Problem.Charles Shaw - forthcoming - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe).
    How should we think of the preferences of citizens? Whereas self-optimal policy is relatively straightforward to produce, socially optimal policy often requires a more detailed examination. In this paper, we identify an issue that has received far too little attention in welfarist modelling of public policy, which we name the "hidden assumptions" problem. Hidden assumptions can be deceptive because they are not expressed explicitly and the social planner (e.g. a policy maker, a regulator, a legislator) may not give them the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Kantian Disregard for Non-Rational Humans: Immanuel Kant’s Haunting Impact on Contemporary Bioethics.Jay Six - 2022 - Stance 15:112-119.
    I seek to emphasize Immanuel Kant’s lingering and unsavory impact on medical ethics by emphasizing Kantian ethics’ disregard for non- rational humans. We must be considerate when discussing individuals who have some form of dementia, conditions that irreversibly diminish the ability to use rational thought, sometimes to a degree of severity that hinders essential daily functions. I argue that to consider ourselves proponents of human equality we must treat humans with dementia as members of the kingdom of ends.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. What Is Antinatalism? And Other Essays: Philosophy of Life in Contemporary Society.Masahiro Morioka - 2021 - Tokyo Philosophy Project.
    This book is a collection of essays on the philosophy of life’s meaning in contemporary society. Topics range from antinatalism, meaning of life, the trolley problem, to painless civilization. I am now writing a comprehensive philosophy book on those topics, but it will take several years to complete; hence, I decided to make a handy book to provide readers with an outline of the philosophical approaches to the meaning of life that I have in mind. -/- Chapter One discusses the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Epistemic Equality: Distributive Epistemic Justice in the Context of Justification.Boaz Miller & Meital Pinto - forthcoming - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal.
    Social inequality may obstruct the generation of knowledge, as the rich and powerful may ‎bring about social acceptance of skewed views that suit their interests. Epistemic equality in ‎the context of ‎justification is a means of preventing such obstruction. Drawing on social ‎epistemology and theories of equality and distributive justice, we provide an account of ‎epistemic equality. We regard participation in, and influence over a ‎knowledge-generating ‎discourse in an epistemic community as a limited good that needs to be justly distributed (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Narrative Coherence and Mental Capacity in Anorexia Nervosa.Alex James Miller Tate - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (1):26-28.
    Cases of severe and enduring Anorexia Nervosa (SEAN) rightly raise a great deal of concern around assessing capacity to refuse treatment (including artificial feeding). Commentators worry that the Court of Protection in England & Wales strays perilously close to a presumption of incapacity in such cases (Cave and Tan 2017, 16), with some especially bold (one might even say reckless) observers suggesting that the ordinary presumption in favor of capacity ought to be reversed in such cases (Ip 2019). -/- Those (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Review of When Death Becomes Life: Notes From a Transplant Surgeon. [REVIEW]Adam Omelianchuk - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):8-12.
    Joshua Mezrich is a practicing transplant surgeon who draws on his experiences, and those of his patients, to provide a "here's where we're at" moment in the story of transplant medicine. In so doing, he explains what it is like to practice while telling the stories of his patients, donors, and the pioneering surgeons who persisted in the face of failure to make what Mezrich does a work of healing. Written for a popular audience, When Death Becomes Life is perhaps (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Epistemic Risk in Representation.Stephanie Harvard & Eric Winsberg - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):1-31.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. COVID-19 Vaccination Status Should Not Be Used in Triage Tie-Breaking.Olivia Schuman, Joelle Robertson-Preidler & Trevor M. Bibler - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics:1-3.
    This article discusses the triage response to the COVID-19 delta variant surge of 2021. One issue that distinguishes the delta wave from earlier surges is that by the time it became the predominant strain in the USA in July 2021, safe and effective vaccines against COVID-19 had been available for all US adults for several months. We consider whether healthcare professionals and triage committees would have been justified in prioritising patients with COVID-19 who are vaccinated above those who are unvaccinated (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Toward an Anti-Maleficent Research Agenda.Hope Ferdowsian, Agustin Fuentes, L. Syd M. Johnson, Barbara J. King & Jessica Pierce - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (1):54-58.
    Important advances in biomedical and behavioral research ethics have occurred over the past few decades, many of them centered on identifying and eliminating significant harms to human subjects of research. Comprehensive attention has not been paid to the totality of harms experienced by animal subjects, although scientific and moral progress require explicit appraisal of these harms. Science is a public good and the prioritizing within, conduct of, generation of, and application of research must soundly address questions about which research is (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Ethical Heuristics for Pandemic Allocation of Ventilators Across Hospitals.César Palacios-González, Jonathan Pugh, Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 22 (1):34-43.
    Developing World Bioethics, Volume 22, Issue 1, Page 34-43, March 2022.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Does Birth Matter?Walter Veit - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (3):194-195.
    This paper is a response to a recent paper by Bobier and Omelianchuk in which they argue that the critics of Giubilini and Minerva’s defence of infanticide fail to adequately justify a moral difference at birth. They argue that such arguments would lead to an intuitively less plausible position: that late-term abortions are permissible, thus creating a dilemma for those who seek to argue that birth matters. I argue that the only way to resolve this dilemma, is to bite the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Future of Global Regulation of Human Genome Editing: A South African Perspective on the WHO Draft Governance Framework on Human Genome Editing.Bonginkosi Shozi, Tamanda Kamwendo, Julian Kinderlerer, Donrich W. Thaldar, Beverley Townsend & Marietjie Botes - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (3):165-168.
    WHO in 2019 established the Advisory Committee on Developing Global Standards for Governance and Oversight of Human Genome Editing, which has recently published a Draft Governance Framework on Human Genome Editing. Although the Draft Framework is a good point of departure, there are four areas of concern: first, it does not sufficiently address issues related to establishing safety and efficacy. Second, issues that are a source of tension between global standard setting and state sovereignty need to be addressed in a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Nudging in Donation Policies: Registration and Decision-Making.Douglas MacKay & Katherine Saylor - 2021 - In Solveig Lena Hansen & Silke Schicktanz (eds.), Ethical Challenges of Organ Transplantation. Bielefeld, Germany: Transcript Verlag. pp. 65-80.
    In this chapter, we provide an overview of the ethical considerations relevant to the use of nudges in organ donation policy. We do not defend a position on the permissibility of nudging in this context, but instead aim to clearly outline the strongest arguments on the different sides of this issue that have been presented in the English-language scholarly bioethics literature. We also highlight the questions that are in need of further investigation. In part 1, we briefly discuss nudging before (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. ENSEÑANZA SOCIAL DE LA IGLESIA Y SU APLICACIÓN EN TIEMPOS DE POSPANDEMIA.Carlos Arboleda Mora - 2021 - Revista Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana 60 (60):63-74.
    La pandemia del Covid19 es un acontecimiento entendido en la forma fenomenológica de su llegada y de su permanencia, pues irrumpe, cambia, afecta a la humanidad en su totalidad. No es un acontecimiento personal o territorial que se convierte en objeto de alguna disciplina en especial o responsabilidad de ciertos actores sociales. Más allá de la búsqueda de su origen o de las causas de su aparición, hay en ella una característica revelatoria que convoca, llama y pide una respuesta. Escuchar (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Mandatory Ontology of Robot Responsibility.Marc Champagne - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (3):448–454.
    Do we suddenly become justified in treating robots like humans by positing new notions like “artificial moral agency” and “artificial moral responsibility”? I answer no. Or, to be more precise, I argue that such notions may become philosophically acceptable only after crucial metaphysical issues have been addressed. My main claim, in sum, is that “artificial moral responsibility” betokens moral responsibility to the same degree that a “fake orgasm” betokens an orgasm.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. For the Common Good: Philosophical Foundations of Research Ethics.Alex John London - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    The foundations of research ethics are riven with fault lines emanating from a fear that if research is too closely connected to weighty social purposes an imperative to advance the common good through research will justify abrogating the rights and welfare of study participants. The result is an impoverished conception of the nature of research, an incomplete focus on actors who bear important moral responsibilities, and a system of ethics and oversight highly attuned to the dangers of research but largely (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Individual Autonomy: Self, Culture, and Bioethics.Ashwani Peetush & Arjuna Maharaj - 2017 - Bioethics UPdate 4 (1):24-34.
    This paper problematizes the concept of individual autonomy in the on-going project of attempting to understand and construct global principles of bioethics. We argue that autonomy as it is commonly defined and interpreted, and the emphasis that is placed on it, presupposes an individualistic concept of the self, family, and community that arises out of a Euro-Western liberal tradition and that is often in tension with various non-Western perspectives. We conclude that a more globally dialogical approach to bioethics is required.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. From the Ground Truth Up: Doing AI Ethics From Practice to Principles.James Brusseau - 2022 - AI and Society 37 (1):1-7.
    Recent AI ethics has focused on applying abstract principles downward to practice. This paper moves in the other direction. Ethical insights are generated from the lived experiences of AI-designers working on tangible human problems, and then cycled upward to influence theoretical debates surrounding these questions: 1) Should AI as trustworthy be sought through explainability, or accurate performance? 2) Should AI be considered trustworthy at all, or is reliability a preferable aim? 3) Should AI ethics be oriented toward establishing protections for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Soul and its Implication in Philosophy, Medicine and Religion.Shamima Parvin Lasker - 2021 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):1-10.
    The reality is that soul and death are the integral part of human life. The soul is the essence of life as fuel is the energy that runs the automobile or the light that makes the eye see. We all see the human body when the soul leaves and the human body is left senseless and ultimately dissolves into the earth. Why we do not have knowledge about soul where this element is the integral part of our human life. Most (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Conscientious Objections, the Nature of Medicine, and the Need for Reformability.Eric J. Kim & Kyle Ferguson - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):63-70.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 1, Page 63-70, January 2022.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. In Service to Others: A New Evolutionary Perspective on Human Enhancement.Hugh Desmond - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (6):33-43.
    In enhancement ethics, evolutionary theory has been largely perceived as supporting liberal views on enhancement, where decisions to enhance are predominantly regulated by the principle of individual autonomy. In this paper I critique this perception in light of recent scientific developments. Cultural evolutionary theory suggests a picture where individual interests are entangled with community interests, and this undermines the applicability of the principle of autonomy. This is particularly relevant for enhancement ethics, given how – I argue – decisions to enhance (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Genomanalysen als Informationseingriff. Ethische, juristische und ökonomische Analysen zum prädiktiven Potential der Genomsequenzierung.Klaus Tanner, Paul Kirchhof, Matthias von der Schulenburg, Rüdiger Wolfrum, Gösta Gantner, Fruzsina Molnár-Gábor, Martin Frank & Plöthner Marika - 2016 - Heidelberg, Deutschland: Winter Universitätsverlag.
    Durch genomweite Analysen werden vielfältige gesundheitsrelevante Informationen über eine Person gewonnen. Solche Informationen können die Behandlung von Krankheiten verbessern. Sie ermöglichen aber auch Vorhersagen, ob eine Person und deren Verwandte in Zukunft möglicherweise erkranken werden. Der neuartige Charakter des Informationseingriffs und sein prädiktive Potential bedürfen der ethischen, juristischen und ökonomischen Reflexion, damit diese Technologie zum Wohl der Patienten, der Familienangehörigen und der Solidargemeinschaft eingesetzt werden kann. Die vorliegende Schrift leistet mit ihren interdisziplinären, vom BMBF finanzierten Analysen dazu einen Beitrag. Grundlagen (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Were Lockdowns Justified? A Return to the Facts and Evidence.Philippe van Basshuysen & Lucie White - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (4):405-428.
    Were governments justified in imposing lockdowns to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic? We argue that a convincing answer to this question is to date wanting, by critically analyzing the factual basis of a recent paper, “How Government Leaders Violated Their Epistemic Duties During the SARS-CoV-2 Crisis” (Winsberg et al. 2020). In their paper, Winsberg et al. argue that government leaders did not, at the beginning of the pandemic, meet the epistemic requirements necessitated to impose lockdowns. We focus on (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. The Epistemic Duties of Philosophers: An Addendum.Philippe van Basshuysen & Lucie White - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (4):447-451.
    We were slightly concerned, upon having read Eric Winsberg, Jason Brennan and Chris Surprenant’s reply to our paper “Were Lockdowns Justified? A Return to the Facts and Evidence”, that they may have fundamentally misunderstood the nature of our argument, so we issue the following clarification, along with a comment on our motivations for writing such a piece, for the interested reader.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Physician as Friend to the Patient.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - In The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Friendship.
    My question in the chapter is this: could (and should) the role of the physician be construed as that of a friend to the patient? I begin by briefly discussing the “friendship model” of the physician-patient relationship—according to which physicians and patients could, and perhaps should, be friends—as well as its history and limitations. Given these limitations, I focus on the more one-sided idea that the physician could, and perhaps should, be a friend to the patient (a “physician-qua-friend model” of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Without a Trace: Why Did Corona Apps Fail?Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):1-4.
    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were put on digital contact tracing, using mobile phone apps to record and immediately notify contacts when a user reports as infected. Such apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as second waves of COVID-19 are raging, these apps are playing a less important role than anticipated. We argue that this is because most countries have opted for app configurations that cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Research Guidelines for Embryoids.Monika Piotrowska - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):67-67.
    Human embryo models formed from stem cells—known as embryoids—allow scientists to study the elusive first stages of human development without having to experiment on actual human embryos. But clear ethical guidelines for research involving embryoids are still lacking. Previously, a handful of researchers put forward new recommendations for embryoids, which they hope will be included in the next set of International Society for Stem Cell Research guidelines. Although these recommendations are an improvement over the default approach, they are nonetheless unworkable, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Prize, Not Price: Reframing Rewards for Kidney Donors.Aksel Braanen Sterri - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):57-57.
    Worldwide 1.2 million people are dying from kidney failure each year, and in the USA alone, approximately 100 000 people are currently on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. One possible solution to the kidney shortage is for governments to pay donors for one of their healthy kidneys and distribute these kidneys according to need. There are, however, compelling objections to this government-monopsony model. To avoid these objections, I propose a small adjustment to the model. I suggest we reward (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. More Than Consent for Ethical Open-Label Placebo Research.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):7-7.
    Recent studies have explored the effectiveness of open-label placebos for a variety of conditions, including chronic pain, cancer-related fatigue and irritable bowel syndrome. OLPs are thought to sidestep traditional ethical worries about placebos because they do not involve deception: with an OLP, patients or subjects are told outright that they are not given an active substance. As deception is framed as the primary hurdle to ethical placebo use, the door is ostensibly opened to ethical studies of OLPs. In this article, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Prognostication of Patients in Coma After Cardiac Arrest: Public Perspectives.Mayli Mertens, Janine van Til, Eline Bouwers-Beens, Marianne Boenink, Jeannette Hofmeijer & Catherina Groothuis-Oudshoorn - 2021 - Resuscitation 169:4-10.
    Aim: To elicit preferences for prognostic information, attitudes towards withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment (WLST) and perspectives on acceptable quality of life after post-anoxic coma within the adult general population of Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the United States of America. Methods: A web-based survey, consisting of questions on respondent characteristics, perspectives on quality of life, communication of prognostic information, and withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, was taken by adult respondents recruited from four countries. Statistical analysis included descriptive analysis and chi2-tests for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Utilitarian Lessons From the COVID-19 Pandemic for Non-Pandemic Diseases.Heather Browning & Walter Veit - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (12):39-42.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has created a unique set of challenges for national governments regarding how to deal with a major international pandemic of almost unprecedented scope. As the pandemic consti...
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Mapping Out the Grounds for African Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics.Chrysogonus M. Okwenna - 2021 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 19 (1):62-71.
    In this paper, I open an inquiry that provides a catalyst for the inauguration of African Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics (APMB) as a full-fledged academic pursuit. I situate this inquiry within the quest of early professional African philosophers for a stirring of the course of contemporary African philosophy along the path of critically retrieving, clarifying, and articulating aspects of traditional African culture and practices in the light of social pluralism and modernization. The case I make for the establishment of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. The Relational Care Framework: Promoting Continuity or Maintenance of Selfhood in Person-Centred Care.Matthew Tieu & Steve Matthews - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    We argue that contemporary conceptualizations of “persons” have failed to achieve the moral goals of “person-centred care” (PCC, a model of dementia care developed by Tom Kitwood) and that they are detrimental to those receiving care, their families, and practitioners of care. We draw a distinction between personhood and selfhood, pointing out that continuity or maintenance of the latter is what is really at stake in dementia care. We then demonstrate how our conceptualization, which is one that privileges the lived (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Cash Incentives, Ethics, and COVID-19 Vaccination.Nancy Jecker - 2021 - Science 6569 (374):819-820.
    Monetary incentives to increase COVID-19 vaccinations are widely used. Even if they work, whether such payments are ethical is contested. This paper reviews ethical arguments for and against using monetary incentives that appeal to utility, liberty, civic responsibility, equity, exploitation, and autonomy. It concludes that in low-income nations and nations with meagre safety nets and income inequality, policy-makers should proceed with caution.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. To Remember, or Not to Remember? Potential Impact of Memory Modification on Narrative Identity, Personal Agency, Mental Health, and Well-Being.Przemysław Zawadzki - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (9):891-899.
    Memory modification technologies (MMTs)—interventions within the memory affecting its functions and contents in specific ways—raise great therapeutic hopes but also great fears. Ethicists have expressed concerns that developing and using MMTs may endanger the very fabric of who we are—our personal identity. This threat has been mainly considered in relation to two interrelated concerns: truthfulness and narrative self‐constitution. In this article, we propose that although this perspective brings up important matters concerning the potential aftermaths of MMT utilization, it fails to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. The Case for Compulsory Surgical Smoke Evacuation Systems in the Operating Theatre.Daniel Rodger - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    Perioperative staff are frequently exposed to surgical smoke created by using heat-generating devices like diathermy and lasers. This is a concern due to mounting evidence that this exposure can be harmful with no safe level of exposure yet identified. First, I briefly summarise the problem posed by surgical smoke exposure and highlight that many healthcare organisations are not sufficiently satisfying their legal and ethical responsibilities to protect their staff from potential harm. Second, I explore the ethical case for compulsory smoke (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Farber’s Reimagined Mad Pride: Strategies for Messianic Utopian Leadership.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-16.
    In this article, I explore Seth Farber’s critique, in The Spiritual Gift of Madness, that the leaders of the Mad Pride movement are failing to realize his vision of the mad as spiritual vanguard of sociopolitical transformation. First, I show how, contra Farber’s polemic, several postmodern theorists are well suited for this leadership (especially the Argentinian post-Marxist philosopher Ernesto Laclau). I reinterpret the first book by the Icarus Project, Navigating the Space between Brilliance and Madness, by reimagining its central metaphor (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Deaf, Not Invisible: Sign Language Interpreting in a Global Pandemic.John Huss & Trzeciak Huss Joanna - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics: Neuroscience 12 (4):280-283.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Listening to Vaccine Refusers.Kaisa Kärki - 2022 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):3-9.
    In bioethics vaccine refusal is often discussed as an instance of free riding on the herd immunity of an infectious disease. However, the social science of vaccine refusal suggests that the reasoning behind refusal to vaccinate more often stems from previous negative experiences in healthcare practice as well as deeply felt distrust of healthcare institutions. Moreover, vaccine refusal often acts like an exit mechanism. Whilst free riding is often met with sanctions, exit, according to Albert Hirschman’s theory of exit and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. An African Response to the Philosophical Crises in Medicine: Towards an African Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics.Chrysogonus M. Okwenna - 2021 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 10 (2):1-16.
    In this paper, I identify two major philosophical crises confronting medicine as a global phenomenon. The first crisis is the epistemological crisis of adopting an epistemic attitude, adequate for improving medical knowledge and practice. The second is the ethical crisis, also known as the “quality-of-care crisis,” arising from the traditional patient-physician dyad. I acknowledge the different proposals put forward in the quest for solutions to these crises. However, I observe that most of these proposals remain inadequate given their over-reliance on (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Beyond Individual Triage: Regional Allocation of Life-Saving Resources such as Ventilators in Public Health Emergencies.Jonathan Pugh, Dominic Wilkinson, Cesar Palacios-Gonzalez & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Health Care Analysis 29 (4):263-282.
    In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers in some countries were forced to make distressing triaging decisions about which individual patients should receive potentially life-saving treatment. Much of the ethical discussion prompted by the pandemic has concerned which moral principles should ground our response to these individual triage questions. In this paper we aim to broaden the scope of this discussion by considering the ethics of broader structural allocation decisions raised by the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, we (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. How to Identify Priority Questions for Bioethics Research.Joseph Millum - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (1):17-18.
    The organizations that fund bioethics research receive many more eligible grant applications than they can support. Academic positions that support bioethics research are likewise scarce. As a resu...
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Care for Language: Etymology as a Continental Argument in Bioethics.Hub Zwart - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (4):645-654.
    Emphasizing the importance of language is a key characteristic of philosophical reflection in general and of bioethics in particular. Rather than trying to eliminate the historicity and ambiguity of language, a continental approach to bioethics will make conscious use of it, for instance by closely studying the history of the key terms we employ in bioethical debates. Continental bioethics entails a focus on the historical vicissitudes of the key signifiers of the bioethical vocabulary, urging us to study the history of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Mind the Gaps: Ethical and Epistemic Issues in the Digital Mental Health Response to Covid‐19.Joshua August Skorburg & Phoebe Friesen - forthcoming - Wiley: Hastings Center Report.
    Well before the COVID-19 pandemic, proponents of digital psychiatry were touting the promise of various digital tools and techniques to revolutionize mental healthcare. As social distancing and its knock-on effects have strained existing mental health infrastructures, calls have grown louder for implementing various digital mental health solutions at scale. Decisions made today will shape the future of mental healthcare for the foreseeable future. We argue that bioethicists are uniquely positioned to cut through the hype surrounding digital mental health, which can (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule: An Addendum.Tyler L. Jaynes - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (3):911-930.
    This addendum expands upon the arguments made in the author’s 2020 essay, “Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligence: Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule”, in an effort to display the significance human augmentation technologies will have on (feasibly) inadvertently providing legal protections to artificial intelligence systems (AIS)—a topic only briefly addressed in that work. It will also further discuss the impacts popular media have on imprinting notions of computerised behaviour and its subsequent consequences on the attribution of legal protections to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule: An Addendum.Tyler L. Jaynes - 2021 - AI and Society 36 (3):911-930.
    This addendum expands upon the arguments made in the author’s 2020 essay, “Legal Personhood for Artificial Intelligence: Citizenship as the Exception to the Rule”, in an effort to display the significance human augmentation technologies will have on (feasibly) inadvertently providing legal protections to artificial intelligence systems (AIS)—a topic only briefly addressed in that work. It will also further discuss the impacts popular media have on imprinting notions of computerised behaviour and its subsequent consequences on the attribution of legal protections to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Wherein is the Concept of Disease Normative? From Weak Normativity to Value-Conscious Naturalism.M. Cristina Amoretti & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 25 (1):1-14.
    In this paper we focus on some new normativist positions and compare them with traditional ones. In so doing, we claim that if normative judgments are involved in determining whether a condition is a disease only in the sense identified by new normativisms, then disease is normative only in a weak sense, which must be distinguished from the strong sense advocated by traditional normativisms. Specifically, we argue that weak and strong normativity are different to the point that one ‘normativist’ label (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (3):269-289.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49. Mit Kontaktdaten gegen die Pandemie: Zur Ethik von Corona Warn-Apps.Philippe van Basshuysen & Lucie White - 2021 - Ethik in der Medizin 33 (3):387-400.
    Zu Beginn der Pandemie im Frühjahr 2020, und nach einem weitreichenden Lockdown, ruhten große Erwartungen auf Corona-Warn-Apps, um einen erneuten Lockdown zu verhindern. Diese Erwartungen haben sich nicht erfüllt; stattdessen wurden in Deutschland als Reaktion auf erneute Wellen von COVID-19 weitere Kontaktbeschränkungen verordnet. Wie hätte die digitale Kontaktverfolgung wirksamer gestaltet werden können? Wir argumentieren, dass es ein Spannungsfeld zwischen der Datensparsamkeit und einer wirksamen Bekämpfung der Pandemie besteht. Im Gegensatz zur deutschen Corona-Warn-App wäre eine Variante der App, in der pseudonymisierte (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Materializing Systemic Racism, Materializing Health Disparities.Vanessa Carbonell & Shen-yi Liao - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (9):16-18.
    The purpose of cultural competence education for medical professionals is to ensure respectful care and reduce health disparities. Yet as Berger and Miller (2021) show, the cultural competence framework is dated, confused, and self-defeating. They argue that the framework ignores the primary driver of health disparities—systemic racism—and is apt to exacerbate rather than mitigate bias and ethnocentrism. They propose replacing cultural competence with a framework that attends to two social aspects of structural inequality: health and social policy, and institutional-system activity; (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 3309